Swishes coming true: An overview of intramural basketball
Feb08

Swishes coming true: An overview of intramural basketball

Published in the February 8, 2017 issue of The Bells Heart pounding. Beads of sweat dripping. The thrill of running back and forth and dribbling the ball with only one goal in mind – making a basket. Created in 1891 by a physical education instructor named Dr. James Naismith, basketball has become one of the most renowned pastimes in the United States. The sport has been ingrained in today’s culture. When most people think of basketball, they picture NBA stars such as Michael Jordan, LeBron James and Stephen Curry. Some UMHB students got the chance to feel like these mega stars for a moment, when they signed up to participate in the university’s intramural basketball league Many players have had past experience playing basketball and bring that feature to their teams. Robert Harris, a junior exercise physiology major who is on the men’s 5v5 team Play2Win, has had plenty of practice on the courts. “I’ve loved to play basketball since I was about ten,” Harris said. Another student, Sarah Moshier, a senior nursing major who is on the women’s 5v5 team TuneSquad, has also had previous experience with basketball prior to joining intramurals. “I’ve been playing basketball since I was nine or ten so it’s always been something I really love,” Moshier said. “I played basketball in high school so it just made sense to continue playing in college.” Besides having experience, another reason some have joined intramural basketball is to learn more about teamwork and getting along with a lot of different people. “[My favorite part is] just playing with my team and learning how to play with people you don’t play on a team with all the time,” Harris said. One thing that many basketball players agree on is that playing a game is a really good workout. Running back and forth on the courts can burn off a lot of calories. On top of that, basketball can also help to ease stress. “It’s good stress relief to be able to run around and do something I love in the midst of all the nursing school chaos,” Moshier said. But perhaps the most important aspect of being on a basketball team is to have fun and form friendships. Moshier has been on the same team with her friends, TuneSquad, for three years. “I have made a lot of lasting friendships since I really had to reach outside of my usual circle to find girls that could hoop,” Moshier said. Maya Kovalic, a freshman math major who is on the women’s 5v5 team Day Old Pizza, says that she enjoys playing basketball because she gets to laugh, have...

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Where are they now- Randy Clayton
Feb08

Where are they now- Randy Clayton

Published in the February 8, 2017 issue of The Bells Randy Clayton played for the UMHB tennis team during the 1983-1984 season. He was the captain of the team when they won the Conference Championship in a playoff game against St. Edwards. Clayton also won the Conference Singles Title during the season. In 1983-1984, UMHB was in the Big State Conference and was in the NAIA Division. Clayton received three degrees while attending UMHB: a sociology degree with a religion minor, and a Physical Education minor. Clayton graduated from UMHB in 1985 and went to get his master’s at Texas A&M University at Kingsville. There, he recieved another two degrees in sociology and psychology when he graduated in 1990. Currently, he works as a Juvenile Probation Officer (JPO). For the past seven months, he has worked in Lampasas, and previously worked for 10 years in Waco. “I got into this work in Waco when I was a Tennis Director at the family YMCA. The facility decided to take out all the tennis courts and put in a new gym and outdoor swimming pool,” he said. “They said I could stay on and direct something in the gym and pool but I decided to try something else.” Clayton says his resume consisted mostly of youth activites, and he decided to try to work with the county and maybe recieve some retirement benefits. Clayton filed many applications for different openings with the Juvenile Probation Department. “I think having a Master’s degree really helped me, and the boss was a tennis fan. I even saw him at a Baylor Bears tennis match and talked to him for a moment or two. I think that helped with me being selected to get the JPO position a few days later,” he said. The requirements for becoming a JPO include but are not limited to: at least 21 years of age; good moral character; Bachelor’s degree from accredited college or university; one year of graduate study or work experience in juvenile, criminal, social service, or related field; no disqualifying criminal history; and to never have had any type of certification revoked by lawful authority of the former TJPC or TJJD. “[UMHB] opened my eyes to a job like this. I was in the Baptist Student Union organization…but, once or twice we did some ministry at the Belton Juvenile Detention Center. I went with some students and we played guitar and did a bible study with the youth. That was my first awareness that there was a ministry for that population. I put it in the back of my mind, never thinking I might be doing...

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College textbooks: necessary or industry racket
Jan25

College textbooks: necessary or industry racket

Published in the January 25, 2017 issue of The Bells Many a college student has complained about the high prices of textbooks. In fact, a statistic from NBC News in 2016 states that the prices of textbooks have gone up by 73 percent since 2006. In addition, the College Board suggests to students that they should plan to spend $1,200 for textbooks and other materials a year. College itself costs a lot of money. Many aspects of the price I believe are worth the value, such as room and board and meal plans. However, spending hundreds and even thousands of dollars on textbooks that a student is unlikely to ever read again is a waste of precious money. The reason why textbooks are so pricey is because publishers know that students have to buy required books in order for them to succeed in their classes. So, they take advantage of them by raising the costs. As college students, we have to make wise decisions with what to spend our money on. We work hard to pay off tuition, and adding unnecessary expenses is not helpful. Most generic books found in bookstores are less than $20 and more than 100 pages long. Last semester, I bought a textbook that was hardly over 100 pages and it cost me $50. I highly doubt that I will read that textbook again since the course that went alongside it didn’t necessarily apply to my major. Even finding used books, which are cheaper to buy than purchasing new textbooks, are fairly expensive compared to the typical book. And even worse, if you want to buy a fairly inexpensive book, it is most likely ripped to shreds or written in. Also, they can be hard to obtain since many people want to buy the used versions and there are only so many of them available. And besides that, a lot of classes require online access codes which require you to either buy a new textbook with that resource, which is even pricier than a stand-alone textbook, or purchase just the access code itself. According to Amazon.com, a MyMathLab access code with eTextbook is around $100. This isn’t to say that we should get rid of textbooks indefinitely. Spending time outside of class to refresh our minds and learn more about the content discussed in class is very important in order to be successful. A poll on campus found that 70 percent of students think that textbooks are useful while 30 percent disagree. There needs to be a better way for college students to obtain textbooks. Book rentals are one good idea because that means you...

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Campus safety resources provide sense of security
Jan25

Campus safety resources provide sense of security

Published in the January 25, 2017 issue of The Bells College is supposed to be one of the best times in a person’s life. It is a time when young people leave home for the first time, make friendships and memories that last a lifetime, and discover more about who they are. Unfortunately, nothing is perfect. Besides worrying about tests and homework, there is one major concern for all college students – our physical safety. According to the University of Oregon, 17% of all college students have experienced violence on campus. The city of Belton is a fairly safe place to live. On bestplaces.net, Belton has a violent crime rate of 29.3 out of 100. Sophomore Nursing major Corey Johnson said he feels safe on campus. “I believe UMHB is fairly safe because as far as I know, nothing huge has happened,” Johnson said. Junior Education major Katelyn Leistico said for the most part she feels safe on campus as well, but she thinks there is always room for improvement. “I mean, there’s obviously more that we can do, like some of the lights aren’t necessarily working and there are definitely parts of campus that are really dark when you’re walking back, especially back to the apartments.” One great thing about attending a Christian college is that most people’s priorities are usually in the right place. A major aspect of attending UMHB is the emphasis on faith-informed discernment.. “Although there are always people who will cause others harm, I think that UMHB is less likely to have those kinds of people,” said freshman interdisciplinary studies major Jordyn Brinkman. Although UMHB has a safe environment, it is always wise for college students to know the resources available to them. Fortunately, UMHB has many tools for students to use to help keep them safe. “Through being involved in student organizations, I have been well-trained on the resources available to ensure student safety,” said sophomore Christian studies major Samuel Kinnin. “The Cru Card scanners, locks on doors, emergency poles, and constant police supervision are great tools we have to keep us safe.” The police department is also a major on-campus resource when it comes to providing safety and security. “The police department does an incredible job of making sure we feel safe through CruAlet systems and having so many policies in place to help provide safety and confidentiality among students,” Kinnin said.Officers are known for having a quick response time and patrolling campus for any suspicious happenings. “We also have a safety liaison through the Student Government Association to make sure all your concerns are addressed to the police department. If any...

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Spread Christmas cheer by watching these family-friendly holiday favorites

Published in the December 7, 2016 issue of The Bells The Christmas season is finally here, and it’s time to sit back and watch some of the greatest holiday films Hollywood has to offer. From a boy left alone to his own devices to a selfish man who transforms into Santa Clause, there’s something for everyone. Here’s a list of our favorites. Find out if yours made the list. 1. Elf (2003) PG Plot: Buddy, a human-raised at the North Pole by Papa Elf, travels to New York City after finding out that he was adopted as a baby. His quest to find and connect with his real father leads to hilarious hi-jinx as he attempts to adjust to life outside of Santa’s workshop. Why you should watch: Movie star Will Ferrell displays his comic genius in every scene, and with one-liners like “I’m just a Cotton-headed Ninny-Muggins,” there’s so much to enjoy. This film is sure to leave both children and adults singing and laughing along. 2. How the Grinch Stole Christmas (2000) PG Plot: Everyone in Whoville is excited and full of Christmas spirit. Everyone, except, the Grinch. After a glimpse into the grumpy Christmas-stealer’s past, the audience comes to understand why he feels the need to ruin the holiday for the Whos. Why you should watch: From the producers of “National Lampoon’s Vacation,” How the Grinch Stole Christmas gives audiences a chance to laugh and cry as they watch the Grinch’s heart grow three sizes too big. 3. National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation (1989) PG-13 Plot: In hopes of impressing his wife, children and visiting extended family, Clark Griswold sets to have the perfect Christmas. From the picture-perfect tree to the most elaborate light display, Griswold puts everything he has into creating a classic Christmas. But, unfortunately he can’t achieve perfection, and fails to live up to his own expectations. Why you should watch: This timeless comedy has a cult following, spanning multiple generations, and never disappoints. Despite the dated clothing and décor, this film hits all the right marks when it comes to holiday cheer. 4. The Polar Express (2004) G Plot: In this modern holiday film, a little boy goes on a journey of a lifetime to the North Pole on a magical train ride across frozen tundra, icy lakes, and windy mountain roads. The boy learns to find his inner strength and learns to believe in Santa and himself once more. Why you should watch: The Polar Express is the perfect way to relive your childhood and the magic of believing in Christmas. 5. Home Alone (1990) PG Plot: After his parents accidentally forget...

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