Tips and tricks to decorate your college dorm room
Aug29

Tips and tricks to decorate your college dorm room

Freshman year can be scary and exciting all at once. Making new friends, finding out where all of your classes are, staying on top of your college courses, getting involved in the community and finding a church home are all new things to juggle. What better way to prepare for the year than to spruce up your living environment? Decorating and organizing your dorm room will help build your feng shui and ease you into the year ahead. While you’re doing your homework, you want to have a nice and relaxing environment to do so. Some ways to create a calming atmosphere in a small space are: •Succulents (on a window sill or desk) •Wallflowers fragrance plugs •Carpet/rug •Posters/wall art •Standing lamp •Whiteboard/cork board calendar Feeling homesick? Here are some remedies: Make sure to bring reminders of your friends and family to keep them close, even if they aren’t physically present. •A photo wall mural on a bulletin board •Photos on the wall with washi tape borders •Picture frame of family/friends •Knick-knacks from family and friends, or items reminding you of your town Dorm rooms are tiny, so when friends or guests come over, the living space becomes even more cramped. Here are some ways to add more seating: •Fold up chairs with cute cushions •Beanbag chairs •Inflatable chairs Want to stay organized? There are many thrifty and creative ways to store your belongings in your dorm room. •Colorful plastic bins to stack on top of each other •Mason jars for pencils and pens •Hanging closet organizer (for snacks, larger items or shoes) In addition, make sure you check your dorm’s guidelines to see what you can and cannot decorate with. For instance, some living spaces with sheetrock walls require you to use picture hanging nails and thumbtacks instead of command strips. Talk to your RA if you have any questions regarding what you can use. Remember, it is important to make your living space as welcoming as possible so you can relax, socialize and study in an appealing environment. This is now your new home, therefore it is essential to love where you...

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AIGA: a design club that enhances skills and networking
Apr11

AIGA: a design club that enhances skills and networking

Design is a relevant topic in this day and age. Many companies are looking for those who have strong design skills to brand their product appropriately. Getting involved in a club that suits your major is important for networking and interacting with those who share your same passions and goals. American Institute of Graphic Arts (AIGA) is a professional organization for design and its members practice all forms of communication design, including graphic design, typography, interaction design, branding and identity. UMHB is lucky to have our very own chapter on campus that caters to those interested in graphic design or digital art. The organization’s aim is to be the standard bearer for professional ethics and practices for the design profession. The official website for AIGA states that it is the profession’s oldest and largest professional membership organization for design—with more than 70 chapters and more than 25,000 members. AIGA advances design as a professional craft, strategic advantage, and vital cultural force. The AIGA website states: “From content that defines the global practice to events that connect and catalyze, we work to enhance the value and deepen the impact of design across all disciplines on business, society, and our collective future. From design fans to the profession’s leading practitioners, AIGA members come from all backgrounds, all fields, and all levels of experience—from all around the world. Whether you’re a design enthusiast, student, freelance designer, in-house designer, design educator, design thinker, or a business owner, AIGA is here to welcome you into the wider world of design.” Recently, members of the organization came up with a logo design that resembles The Incredibles title. Chriscina Lampkin, a junior graphic design major, produced the design. She is actively involved in creating digital art. She explains that in her graphic design class, the students had to make a logo for another person. “I eventually got to do a product mockup of a tattoo ink bottle, because the guy I did the logo for was into tattoos,” Lampkin said. “AIGA has really helped me gain progress in my designs.” Alexandra Boivin is a senior fine arts major and the current president of AIGA. She is looking for someone to take the reins over the organization after she graduates in May. She has many visions for the future of AIGA. She explained that one purpose of the organization is to make and develop connections that students can have long after graduation. Boivin says it’s important to “have that crowd of people” to go back and connect with later on in your career. Any students who enjoy collaborating on art, coming up with ideas for their projects,...

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Easter Pageant showcases the Gospel to community and globe
Apr11

Easter Pageant showcases the Gospel to community and globe

It came close, but the annual UMHB Easter Pageant has never been stopped by bad weather in all of its 79 year history. This year was no exception after all the rain in the morning and the night before. Though rain storms delayed the first showing by forty-five minutes, prayers were answered as the three performances of the play about Jesus’ life were performed that afternoon under clearing skies, just like the first performance in 1940. Although the noon showing was delayed 45 minutes due to rain storms, there were still three performances that went as planned on the afternoon of March 28, just as it has since 1940. That year, Easter Pageant began providing the surrounding community of UMHB with the extraordinary opportunity to witness the retelling of Jesus’ life. Every year people come together from near and far to acknowledge and celebrate the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ as students at the university perform the story based on the ultimate sacrifice. This was the second year that live-streaming of the play was seen by people across the world. Last year’s performance generated around 31,503 viewers, who came from 22 states and six countries, including Brazil, Cameroon, Canada, Ghana, Nigeria and Germany. According to the university’s website, 1,000 streamers watched an entire performance online this year. In addition, 5,000 people attended Easter Pageant on campus. One attendee, Lois Williams of Belton, has lived in the area for eight years. “I think I’ve only missed one year since we’ve moved here,” Williams said. “I just love the story and the commitment of all the students who put it on, and I have three little grandsons who live here who come with us with our kids. I look forward to their response to the Easter story.” Another audience member, Cynthia Tryon, is the advisor for the Association of Black Students on campus and has been coming to Easter Pageant for eleven years. “I look forward to the scene where the tomb is rolled away, and Jesus comes out,” Tryon said. “I love the part where they always invite everyone to come to Jesus, to invite Him to their hearts.” The performances that were livestreamed are up on the website and are still available to be viewed. Alyssa Silva, who works for the media services at the university, helped film Easter Pageant, and said that she learned a lot from the process. “Last year, I was a part of the special make-up team and I was up close and personal with Jesus,” Silva said. “I saw firsthand what was happening behind the scenes and the emotional draining Jesus went through....

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Circle K teams up with Threads of Hope
Mar07

Circle K teams up with Threads of Hope

Circle K International is an organization on campus that engages with the community through various service projects. A unique aspect of this club is that it is run entirely by the student body. Shelby Rogers, a senior psychology major, is the Vice President of Circle K. “Circle K is an international volunteer organization. We aim to serve anyone from our community to our world,” Rogers said. Sophomore education major Naomi Michaelson and sophomore Christian studies major Jordyn Brinkman are both members of this club. “We are the college version of Key Club, which is a service organization for high school students,” Brinkman said. “Above us is Kiwanis Club, which is for adults. We do a lot of fun service projects like bake sales and volunteering at animal shelters.” “This is really cool for us because we have a lot of opportunities to get together with clubs from Baylor, Hardin Simmons, MCC and others,” Michaelson said. One project that Circle K puts on every year is selling bracelets and lanyards that are hand crafted by women and children from the Philippines through Threads of Hope. Circle K sponsors Threads of Hope, which is an organization that supports those who are living in the Philippines by promoting these accessories. Throughout the month of February, Circle K set up a table in Bawcom Student Union to sell these items to students. Rogers described the significance of these bracelets and lanyards in more detail. “Threads of Hope is an organization that provides a wholesome way for women and children in the Philippines to make an income for their families,” Rogers said. “This allows them to not have to resort to other methods such as child labor or prostitution to make this income which is common in the Philippines.” These accessories ranged from $2 to $4, and half of the proceeds went back to the Filipino families who made these bracelets and lanyards. The other half of the sale went to Circle K International for event funding. Circle K is a great way to get involved in helping the community. “My favorite part of Circle K has been getting to know others while we serve together,” Michaelson said. “Circle K provides us with so many service opportunities where we’re able to work hard, but also have a super fun time.” “People can get involved by coming to our meetings on Thursday nights at 7:30 in Bawcom Conference Room 1,” Rogers said. If you are interested in joining this organization, they are always looking for more...

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Local flea market provides a fun shopping experience for all ages
Feb21

Local flea market provides a fun shopping experience for all ages

Driving down Highway 190 was a pretty uneventful way to spend a Saturday morning. My friends and I were craving something exciting and different to do, but we weren’t entirely sure what that would entail. We decided it might be fun to check out the Bell County Flea Market. So, we put the location into the GPS and headed to 1930 George Wilson Rd, which is only six minutes away from campus. As we found a parking spot and headed out, my excitement grew. It had been years since I had been to a flea market. My greatest memories taking me back to when I was in elementary school and my parents would take me on an early Saturday morning to score good deals on household items. I was shocked to discover that the market was fairly desolate, my friends and I being some of the only travelers at this site. However, it was freezing that day, so I assumed many regular shoppers stayed home to avoid the cold. Regardless, I was surprised that there weren’t many people there. After checking out some of the booths, I soon discovered that this flea market was a trove of hidden wonders. From tin plates representing famous pop culture figures or vinyl albums, to antique jewelry boxes or a giant Sinclair dinosaur statue. This flea market has items that are sure to please a wide variety of people. There are stories behind the items, as many of the objects found at the market are vintage and collectible, but there are also stories behind the vendors. David Lambert is one such seller who runs a shop at the Bell County Flea Market. “I’ve been in this store for five years,” Lambert said. “I’ve been setting up here at the Bell County Flea Market since 1989.” In response to what his most interesting interaction with a customer was, Lambert was quick to give his answer. “They’re all interesting as long as they give me cash,” Lambert said. Lambert went on to describe his buying method, in which he tries to make a dollar on every item he purchases. “If I can sell it for only $50, even though it’s worth $300, I’ll buy it for $49. On Saturday, I normally try to sell about 4,000 items and make a dollar a piece on them.” “We’re closed on Sunday, even though the flea markets open,” Lambert said. “Before I got saved, I was a publicist for Roadrunner Records. I was in the metal scene for about twenty-two years. I gave them opinions and ideas on how to better their image to sell their albums and...

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