Art Inspired by Sound – FAE event combines painting and music
Oct01

Art Inspired by Sound – FAE event combines painting and music

“Art Inspired by Sound” combined two different art forms in a performance at the Sue and Frank Mayborn Performing Arts Center on campus Thursday, Sept. 20. Piano music composed by UMHB’s Dean Kathryn Fouse of the College of Visual Arts accompanied projections of paintings inspired by her music. The artwork was painted to the sound of her music by Samford University’s Associate Dean and Professor of Art and Design Larry Thompson. The piece performed was “The People United Will Never Be Defeated,” created by American composer Frederic Rzewski in 1975. It was heavily inspired by “El Pueblo Unido Jamás Será Vencido,” a Chilean revolutionary song written by Sergio Ortega. The music describes the events of June 1973, when Ortega witnessed a street singer yelling “the people united will never be defeated,” which is a “well-known Chilean chant for social change” (Rice.edu). According to the Rice article, the song was designed to be performed by a guitar ensemble and voices. There were six sets of the song performed, each with six different variations of the song. To end the performance, the introductory sounds returned, bringing the piece full circle. Fouse, who has performed at venues such as the World Piano Conference in Novi Sad, Serbia, and the soundscape New Music Festival in Maccagno, Italy, never seemed to waver as she played beautiful melodies, and her passion was definitely brought into the performance. Andrew Ortega, a Fort Hood resident, was an attendee at the event. “My favorite part was when the pianist was playing …. toward the end of the presentation,” Ortega said, “and the music began to swell with emotion and the pianist was so invested in the piece it seemed to move her emotionally.” Thompson described how his painting process worked to fit in conjunction with the musical piece. “I spent hours with headphones on, listening to the color of the sounds, the moments of emphasis, and instances of transitions in sound,” Thompson said. “Pages of my sketchbook were filled with thumbnail sketches and ideas of how to layer a painting based on what I was hearing on a formal level.” He took pictures of each transition of his artwork to fit the timing of Fouse’s playing. The paintings were abstract and minimalist, although Thompson would not label himself as that kind of artist because he believes in the ideology that, as he said, “art… should be what it needs to be, given the message to be communicated.” Thompson’s works have been featured across the globe and in the United States. Belton resident Jessica Ortega said that she and her husband made a date night out of the event...

Read More

Hurricane Harvey: UMHB students share their thoughts about life after the storm

It has been a little over a year since devastation wreaked havoc in the Houston area. What started as a small tropical storm quickly became a category four hurricane, causing a large loss of life and property. On August 17, 2017, Hurricane Harvey hit on the eastern coast of Texas. According to the Houston Public Media from the University of Houston, the hurricane caused at least 72 fatalities. The rise in water was measured at 12.5 feet at the Aransas Wildlife Refuge. According to worldvison.org, 135,000 houses were affected by Hurricane Harvey as many people lost their homes and everything they owned. Harvey also became the second most expensive hurricane in the United States since 1900 (worldvision.org). Fox news estimates an average of 154 billion in damages across the state of Texas as a result of the storm. Sarah Harvey, who just happens to have the same last name as the name of the storm, is a senior marketing major at UMHB, whose hometown, Port Neches, was heavily affected. “The night Hurricane Harvey hit, it was controlled chaos,” Sarah said. “Everyone who had a boat was out in the floodwaters rescuing people from their homes that had filled with water. My family made it up to our church, where my mom was on staff at the time. The gym at the church hadn’t flooded, so it became a shelter in the area. The rains didn’t stop and the flooding continued all through the night. For days after that, the water didn’t go down. I felt so helpless because I was here in Belton.” In response to the disaster and all the people in need, various communities came together to help one another. Brianna Flanter, a freshman biology and pre-dental major, witnessed her neighborhood and the surrounding cities outside of Houston band together to create a bit of light in this dark time. “I actually live about 30 minutes outside of Houston so everything around us got flooded,” Flanter said. “All my neighbors, friends, and family got water in their houses. However, even in literal high water, everyone stayed extremely positive. Rescue boats from people in our town, other towns, and even other states came to help us out.” “When the flooding dried out, people immediately started helping people demo their homes and donating at shelters. Most of the shelters in Houston actually couldn’t even accept more food. Houston really came together and it made me really emotional.” Both Flanter and Sarah Harvey became involved in the helping process, assisting in various ways. “My high school was working really hard to put on a musical that was supposed to open...

Read More
Tips and tricks to decorate your college dorm room
Aug29

Tips and tricks to decorate your college dorm room

Freshman year can be scary and exciting all at once. Making new friends, finding out where all of your classes are, staying on top of your college courses, getting involved in the community and finding a church home are all new things to juggle. What better way to prepare for the year than to spruce up your living environment? Decorating and organizing your dorm room will help build your feng shui and ease you into the year ahead. While you’re doing your homework, you want to have a nice and relaxing environment to do so. Some ways to create a calming atmosphere in a small space are: •Succulents (on a window sill or desk) •Wallflowers fragrance plugs •Carpet/rug •Posters/wall art •Standing lamp •Whiteboard/cork board calendar Feeling homesick? Here are some remedies: Make sure to bring reminders of your friends and family to keep them close, even if they aren’t physically present. •A photo wall mural on a bulletin board •Photos on the wall with washi tape borders •Picture frame of family/friends •Knick-knacks from family and friends, or items reminding you of your town Dorm rooms are tiny, so when friends or guests come over, the living space becomes even more cramped. Here are some ways to add more seating: •Fold up chairs with cute cushions •Beanbag chairs •Inflatable chairs Want to stay organized? There are many thrifty and creative ways to store your belongings in your dorm room. •Colorful plastic bins to stack on top of each other •Mason jars for pencils and pens •Hanging closet organizer (for snacks, larger items or shoes) In addition, make sure you check your dorm’s guidelines to see what you can and cannot decorate with. For instance, some living spaces with sheetrock walls require you to use picture hanging nails and thumbtacks instead of command strips. Talk to your RA if you have any questions regarding what you can use. Remember, it is important to make your living space as welcoming as possible so you can relax, socialize and study in an appealing environment. This is now your new home, therefore it is essential to love where you...

Read More
AIGA: a design club that enhances skills and networking
Apr11

AIGA: a design club that enhances skills and networking

Design is a relevant topic in this day and age. Many companies are looking for those who have strong design skills to brand their product appropriately. Getting involved in a club that suits your major is important for networking and interacting with those who share your same passions and goals. American Institute of Graphic Arts (AIGA) is a professional organization for design and its members practice all forms of communication design, including graphic design, typography, interaction design, branding and identity. UMHB is lucky to have our very own chapter on campus that caters to those interested in graphic design or digital art. The organization’s aim is to be the standard bearer for professional ethics and practices for the design profession. The official website for AIGA states that it is the profession’s oldest and largest professional membership organization for design—with more than 70 chapters and more than 25,000 members. AIGA advances design as a professional craft, strategic advantage, and vital cultural force. The AIGA website states: “From content that defines the global practice to events that connect and catalyze, we work to enhance the value and deepen the impact of design across all disciplines on business, society, and our collective future. From design fans to the profession’s leading practitioners, AIGA members come from all backgrounds, all fields, and all levels of experience—from all around the world. Whether you’re a design enthusiast, student, freelance designer, in-house designer, design educator, design thinker, or a business owner, AIGA is here to welcome you into the wider world of design.” Recently, members of the organization came up with a logo design that resembles The Incredibles title. Chriscina Lampkin, a junior graphic design major, produced the design. She is actively involved in creating digital art. She explains that in her graphic design class, the students had to make a logo for another person. “I eventually got to do a product mockup of a tattoo ink bottle, because the guy I did the logo for was into tattoos,” Lampkin said. “AIGA has really helped me gain progress in my designs.” Alexandra Boivin is a senior fine arts major and the current president of AIGA. She is looking for someone to take the reins over the organization after she graduates in May. She has many visions for the future of AIGA. She explained that one purpose of the organization is to make and develop connections that students can have long after graduation. Boivin says it’s important to “have that crowd of people” to go back and connect with later on in your career. Any students who enjoy collaborating on art, coming up with ideas for their projects,...

Read More
Easter Pageant showcases the Gospel to community and globe
Apr11

Easter Pageant showcases the Gospel to community and globe

It came close, but the annual UMHB Easter Pageant has never been stopped by bad weather in all of its 79 year history. This year was no exception after all the rain in the morning and the night before. Though rain storms delayed the first showing by forty-five minutes, prayers were answered as the three performances of the play about Jesus’ life were performed that afternoon under clearing skies, just like the first performance in 1940. Although the noon showing was delayed 45 minutes due to rain storms, there were still three performances that went as planned on the afternoon of March 28, just as it has since 1940. That year, Easter Pageant began providing the surrounding community of UMHB with the extraordinary opportunity to witness the retelling of Jesus’ life. Every year people come together from near and far to acknowledge and celebrate the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ as students at the university perform the story based on the ultimate sacrifice. This was the second year that live-streaming of the play was seen by people across the world. Last year’s performance generated around 31,503 viewers, who came from 22 states and six countries, including Brazil, Cameroon, Canada, Ghana, Nigeria and Germany. According to the university’s website, 1,000 streamers watched an entire performance online this year. In addition, 5,000 people attended Easter Pageant on campus. One attendee, Lois Williams of Belton, has lived in the area for eight years. “I think I’ve only missed one year since we’ve moved here,” Williams said. “I just love the story and the commitment of all the students who put it on, and I have three little grandsons who live here who come with us with our kids. I look forward to their response to the Easter story.” Another audience member, Cynthia Tryon, is the advisor for the Association of Black Students on campus and has been coming to Easter Pageant for eleven years. “I look forward to the scene where the tomb is rolled away, and Jesus comes out,” Tryon said. “I love the part where they always invite everyone to come to Jesus, to invite Him to their hearts.” The performances that were livestreamed are up on the website and are still available to be viewed. Alyssa Silva, who works for the media services at the university, helped film Easter Pageant, and said that she learned a lot from the process. “Last year, I was a part of the special make-up team and I was up close and personal with Jesus,” Silva said. “I saw firsthand what was happening behind the scenes and the emotional draining Jesus went through....

Read More
Page 1 of 812345...Last »