Briana Frederickson crowned Miss MHB
Nov13

Briana Frederickson crowned Miss MHB

“Here’s to the ones who dream, foolish as they may seem.” No quote could be more fitting for this year’s Miss Mary Hardin-Baylor pageant theme, which is derived from the 2016 rom-com film “La La Land.” Nineteen female students representing various organizations and campus buildings took to the stage to showcase their talents and passions. The pageant was split into numerous sections, such as the talent competition, special talent presentation, group dance, evening gown walk, behind the scenes video, and interviews of the top five finalists. In addition, the women were judged according to four categories – interview, talent, platform, and evening gown. The person behind the pageant was Alexis Goddard, a senior social work major. “I have loved the process of pageant,” Goddard said. “The audience only gets to see the final production, which is awesome, but it’s really fun to be there for every comical, creative, and captivating moment,” Goddard said. “Seeing the unique growth in each girl is what this pageant is all about. Being the director has reminded me that it truly takes a village to make this tradition happen. Going into it, I had the mindset of ‘okay, I’ve got to do this, this and this,’ but if I tried to do it all on my own, the show would go horribly wrong,” she said. “There are a million moving parts involved and I have had the most talented team surrounding me.” Some of these talents featured spoken word, interpretive dances, musical skills such as singing and piano performance, and skits. Jordan Eilers, a senior English education major, represented an organization called Circle K, and performed a skit about a story close to her heart, called “Pinkalicious.” She chose this story because her platform is engaging struggling learners through reading. “My favorite part has definitely been getting to know all the girls and making friends with people I wouldn’t have had the opportunity to meet,” Eilers said. Senior Criminal Justice and psychology major Kelly Taylor represented Campus Activities Board. She performed a comedic skit about wrapping Christmas presents. “Getting to know the other 18 amazing girls has definitely been my favorite part,” Taylor said. “Everyone is so encouraging and uplifting and they brighten my day at every practice.” In addition, the contestants performed group dances to “La La Land” songs such as “Someone in the Crowd” and “A Lovely Night.” After the group dances came the evening gown walk. The women entered the stage in stunning dresses, and were escorted by male students as their background was described by the hosts. The judges came to a decision about the top five finalists: Miss Student...

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Fall Fashion
Nov13

Fall Fashion

Fall is all about bundling up in warm layers and embracing the cool, crisp air, and it is a great season to bring out the cozy clothing. However, here in Texas, this season can be very unpredictable in terms of weather, so it is good to be prepared and bring layers of clothing in case of a weather change in the middle of the day. As the season continues, indulge in warm cups of coffee, grab a good book to read on a park bench and follow these fashion tips to make the most of autumn. 1) Andrew Ortega, Fort Hood resident The 80s are making a comeback, and what better way to get in the fall spirit than with a classic flannel sweatshirt? Pairing it with a simple T-shirt is a good complement, and if the weather becomes too cold, you can always take the flannel off and either place it around your waist or hoist it over your shoulder. If you don’t have earthy tones, darker colors work just fine. Plus, a beanie is always a good investment for that perfect hipster fall vibe. 2) Maegan James, sophomore nursing major Wool and denim are good pairs, both of which will keep you nice and warm in the cooler days of fall. Boots, especially warmer, darker colors, are always a nice addition to autumn attire. Similar to flannel, stripes are a lovely pattern to wear during this season. 3) Alexandria Hazard, junior business management major Hazard wears ripped jeans, tan boots, a floral sweatshirt and a tan T-shirt. When wearing an un dershirt, make sure to wear a basic colored garment so the top layer can stand out more. To accent the shirt, she has a gold dreamcatcher necklace. In addition, she is wearing a gold watch. Earthy tones such as tan, beige and mossy green are perfect for fall, and the gold accessories make the outfit come together as a whole to give it some shimmer and shine. 4) Elyssa Childress, junior nursing major Maybe it’s not cold enough for a beanie, but you still want to wear a hat. A sun hat is a great accessory for those hot fall days. Childress sports this rich, red wine hat that goes well with a white, high-necked sweater and a flowing, darker-colored jumpsuit. When choosing an outfit, contrast can be your best friend. Don’t be afraid to wear both dark and light colors. Just remember to keep the fall colors in mind – browns, dark greens, reds and oranges. Think about the changing colors of the leaves in the trees, and change your outfit accordingly. 5) Peter Zuniga,...

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Falling in love: Date ideas for you and your boo
Nov13

Falling in love: Date ideas for you and your boo

Looking for ideas for fall themed dates? The Bells has you covered. Check out the following for some great ideas sure to make your girlfriend or boyfriend swoon. Pumpkin Patch: Fall is the perfect season for a romantic date to a pumpkin patch. You can go on a haunted hayride, take pictures among the pumpkins and even buy a pumpkin or two. Pumpkin patches at family farms can be so much fun on a crisp fall day. You could take your pumpkins back to campus to decorate or carve them. You can even make a competition out of it and have your friends vote on their favorite design. While decorating your pumpkins, treat yourself to some homemade caramel apples that are sticky sweet or apple cider that is sure to get you into the season. Haunted House: Spooky couples will love this idea. There are a ton of haunted houses in the area begging for couples who want a fright to come by. This option is a little more on the pricey side. However, it is a memory you will cherish forever and never forget. Just make sure your partner is down for a night of frights before you take them. A Picnic Date: Picnics are always a great date idea. After all, what’s better than a date involving food? A perfect place to have a picnic would be at Burt Pond, a great date spot that is conveniently located on campus. Grab a blanket and some sandwiches from SubConnection or pick up Italian food to go and enjoy a relaxing meal by the pond. Bonus: You could even stay out to watch the sunset. Scary Movie Marathon: Meet up for a scary movie marathon and watch all the classics. Townsend Memorial Library and Redbox have lots of good movies to rent and watch. Make some popcorn and enjoy a good scare together. Not a scary movie person? You can always watch good Halloween movies from your childhood, like “Halloweentown”, “Twitches” and “Hocus Pocus”. Go Coffee Shop Hopping: There are so many coffee shops in the Belton area, all of which feature delicious seasonal drinks and treats. Go on a romantic journey from one coffee shop to another. Visit one shop per day for a week, or go to as many different shops as possible in one day. What better way to spend time together than by sharing a cup of joe? Find a free souvenir, a napkin or a stir stick, so you can take from each place a memento to cherish your coffee shop hopping date experience...

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Art Inspired by Sound – FAE event combines painting and music
Oct01

Art Inspired by Sound – FAE event combines painting and music

“Art Inspired by Sound” combined two different art forms in a performance at the Sue and Frank Mayborn Performing Arts Center on campus Thursday, Sept. 20. Piano music composed by UMHB’s Dean Kathryn Fouse of the College of Visual Arts accompanied projections of paintings inspired by her music. The artwork was painted to the sound of her music by Samford University’s Associate Dean and Professor of Art and Design Larry Thompson. The piece performed was “The People United Will Never Be Defeated,” created by American composer Frederic Rzewski in 1975. It was heavily inspired by “El Pueblo Unido Jamás Será Vencido,” a Chilean revolutionary song written by Sergio Ortega. The music describes the events of June 1973, when Ortega witnessed a street singer yelling “the people united will never be defeated,” which is a “well-known Chilean chant for social change” (Rice.edu). According to the Rice article, the song was designed to be performed by a guitar ensemble and voices. There were six sets of the song performed, each with six different variations of the song. To end the performance, the introductory sounds returned, bringing the piece full circle. Fouse, who has performed at venues such as the World Piano Conference in Novi Sad, Serbia, and the soundscape New Music Festival in Maccagno, Italy, never seemed to waver as she played beautiful melodies, and her passion was definitely brought into the performance. Andrew Ortega, a Fort Hood resident, was an attendee at the event. “My favorite part was when the pianist was playing …. toward the end of the presentation,” Ortega said, “and the music began to swell with emotion and the pianist was so invested in the piece it seemed to move her emotionally.” Thompson described how his painting process worked to fit in conjunction with the musical piece. “I spent hours with headphones on, listening to the color of the sounds, the moments of emphasis, and instances of transitions in sound,” Thompson said. “Pages of my sketchbook were filled with thumbnail sketches and ideas of how to layer a painting based on what I was hearing on a formal level.” He took pictures of each transition of his artwork to fit the timing of Fouse’s playing. The paintings were abstract and minimalist, although Thompson would not label himself as that kind of artist because he believes in the ideology that, as he said, “art… should be what it needs to be, given the message to be communicated.” Thompson’s works have been featured across the globe and in the United States. Belton resident Jessica Ortega said that she and her husband made a date night out of the event...

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Hurricane Harvey: UMHB students share their thoughts about life after the storm

It has been a little over a year since devastation wreaked havoc in the Houston area. What started as a small tropical storm quickly became a category four hurricane, causing a large loss of life and property. On August 17, 2017, Hurricane Harvey hit on the eastern coast of Texas. According to the Houston Public Media from the University of Houston, the hurricane caused at least 72 fatalities. The rise in water was measured at 12.5 feet at the Aransas Wildlife Refuge. According to worldvison.org, 135,000 houses were affected by Hurricane Harvey as many people lost their homes and everything they owned. Harvey also became the second most expensive hurricane in the United States since 1900 (worldvision.org). Fox news estimates an average of 154 billion in damages across the state of Texas as a result of the storm. Sarah Harvey, who just happens to have the same last name as the name of the storm, is a senior marketing major at UMHB, whose hometown, Port Neches, was heavily affected. “The night Hurricane Harvey hit, it was controlled chaos,” Sarah said. “Everyone who had a boat was out in the floodwaters rescuing people from their homes that had filled with water. My family made it up to our church, where my mom was on staff at the time. The gym at the church hadn’t flooded, so it became a shelter in the area. The rains didn’t stop and the flooding continued all through the night. For days after that, the water didn’t go down. I felt so helpless because I was here in Belton.” In response to the disaster and all the people in need, various communities came together to help one another. Brianna Flanter, a freshman biology and pre-dental major, witnessed her neighborhood and the surrounding cities outside of Houston band together to create a bit of light in this dark time. “I actually live about 30 minutes outside of Houston so everything around us got flooded,” Flanter said. “All my neighbors, friends, and family got water in their houses. However, even in literal high water, everyone stayed extremely positive. Rescue boats from people in our town, other towns, and even other states came to help us out.” “When the flooding dried out, people immediately started helping people demo their homes and donating at shelters. Most of the shelters in Houston actually couldn’t even accept more food. Houston really came together and it made me really emotional.” Both Flanter and Sarah Harvey became involved in the helping process, assisting in various ways. “My high school was working really hard to put on a musical that was supposed to open...

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