Students find new opportunities at job and internship fair

McLane Hall was filled with booths occupied by 42 companies and organizations around the Belton area on Tuesday, Oct. 1. Company representatives were looking for students from all different majors. The UMHB career services department job internship fair was to “help students and alumni find opportunities, talk with recruiters directly, and hopefully find jobs,” Assistant Director of Career Services Emily Kelly said. Kelly said she hoped that “students find work they love.” For over 20 years, UMHB has been holding job fairs. Recently, they have added internships to broaden the opportunities for students. Students were seen talking in business attire with a name tag featuring their name and major on it for company recruiters, who were willing to give jobs to anyone they saw as a good fit for their specific company. Not only was the job and internship fair a good way for students and alumni to get jobs, but it was also a great way to freshen up their interview skills. The interviews were like what you would see in speed dating, where a recruiter would be standing talking to one candidate then would move on to the next recruiter after they were done. Overall, whether the student or alumni got a job or internship they had an experience that they can carry on with them...

Read More

One Voice inspires with praise

The One Voice choral ensemble rocked the Fikes Chamber Performance Hall Oct 10- Oct 11 with music that brought its audience on an emotional joyride. The concert began in reverence with Salvator Mundi from Requiem, written by Herbert Howells. The song detailed in heart-aching, searing beauty, an expression of loss that echoed with every line throughout the performance hall. The choir sang “Save us! Help us!” tenderly as the piece concluded. Taking a few steps back in time with traditional selections such as Canticum B.Simeonis Herr, nun lässest Du Deinen Diener and Cantate Domino, by Heinrich Schütz, which were performed in the late 1500s and early 1600s carried the typical cathedral sound partial to church music of the time period. It was this sound that served as the cornerstone for choral music as a whole, even now. One Voice’s seamless performance of this very sound had the audience at a standstill; they basked in the melancholic melodies that washed over them as three soloists, James Jones, Cydney Wilkerson and Sarah Ash sang to represent the Blessed Soul of the Fallen, the Holy Spirit, and the Seraphim, while the rest of the ensemble carried on as the procession. This piece included wonderful, solemn instrumentation provided by Lisa Clement, organist and voice teacher at UMHB, Ashton Yarbrough, a student at Temple College and cellist Nathaniel Keefer, a teacher at Lamar Middle School in Temple. What was truly astounding was One Voice’s flexibility in mastering the execution of so many different styles of voice and song. Singing in order from year of release and style (from traditional to modern to something in-between at the program’s closure), the One Voice program consisted of classic choral, gospel, contemporary christian and even a funky be-doop style partial to barber shop singers in the 40s. “I auditioned for One Voice because I had heard about all the things they had performed and I wanted to be a part of their legacy,” said freshmen music education major and One Voice member, Chandler Webb. “When I auditioned for the ensemble, one of the things I told the director during my meeting with him was I wanted to grow in two ways,” Webb said. “Spiritually and musically. I feel that this ensemble has done both …for me because we have sung in so many styles that all praise God, “ Webb said. Throughout the performance, a sense of comradery could be felt in the singers as they swayed, snapped, clapped and even kazooed together. It was infectious in nature, spreading to the audience. “The thing I like the most about One Voice is we’re a family growing and worshiping...

Read More
Crusaders defend title against Texas Lutheran
Nov26

Crusaders defend title against Texas Lutheran

  By Sterling Dube Editor in Chief and Jaykwon Thompson Contributing Writer   The atmosphere at Crusader Stadium on Nov. 9 was electric as the stands were filled with fans ready to see the final home game of the regular season get underway. The captains for the game: Jonel Reed, Keith Gipson, Joey Longoria and Jefferson Fritz  won the coin toss and gave the first possession to Texas Lutheran. As if it was a precursor to the slaughter that would happen throughout the game, the Bulldogs’ return team bobbled the ball and barely recovered it for a small gain. This slowed down any momentum that the Bulldogs had at the start of the game and resulted in a quick punting situation. The Crusader offense was off to a very early start and got the football down to the Bulldogs’ 20 yard-line. However, two consecutive false starts quickly killed any chances of an early touchdown for UMHB. Kicker Anthony Avila completed an impressive field goal in an attempt to salvage the drive. The score was UMHB, 3, Texas Lutheran, 0. While the Crusader defense prevented the Bulldogs from ever having any real momentum, it did not mean that they had an easy time. There were many plays when the Bulldogs’ quarterback, Wade Freeman, forced the defense on a wild goose chance in the back field. He was often dodging and breaking tackles for 10 seconds at a time before either scrambling the ball himself or throwing a quick pass for a gain of a couple of yards. Defensive end Khevon Shepard was one of the only people who could say they sacked the elusive QB. After getting the ball back from Texas Lutheran, the Crusaders did what they do best. They battered the Bulldog’s defense until an opening was made. Running back Marquis Duncan used that opening in the defense to run into the endzone for UMHB’s first touchdown of the day, increasing the Crusaders’ early lead 10-0 after a successful field goal (PAT). Any attempt for the Bulldogs to retaliate to the touchdown in the second quarter were snuffed completely when a 4-yard sack followed by a key interception by defensive back Jefferson Fritz killed the Bulldogs’ offensive momentum for the rest of the game. From their now advantageous field position, the Crusader offensive, led by QB Jace Hammack easily got back into the endzone with a touchdown pass to WR Jonel Reed. After a successful PAT, the score was 17-0. The half continued at a snail’s pace with neither team getting the upper hand.  The Cru eventually got within field goal range and managed to snag an additional...

Read More
Crusaders feel the heat against the Hardin-Simmons Cowboys
Nov26

Crusaders feel the heat against the Hardin-Simmons Cowboys

  For a game that was as intense and dramatic as the Crusaders’ 15-14 victory over Hardin-Simmons turned out to be, the weather seemed to convey a sense of calm before the storm. Clear skies, moderate temperatures, and light breezes were what fans on both sides of the gridiron were met with when they arrived at Crusader Stadium on Oct. 26. The atmosphere was tense, as for the first time this season the entire “away” section of the stadium was filled to the last seat with fans from Hardin-Simmons ready to cheer their team to victory. The Crusader captains for this game, junior defensive back Jefferson Fritz, senior wide receiver Jonel Reed, senior cornerback Keith Gipson and senior defensive tackle Joey Longoria met with the captains of Hardin-Simmons to win the opening coin toss that allowed Simmons’ possession of the ball first. The Crusader defense really came to play as their airtight defense easily snuffed out any attempt by Hardin-Simmons to gain an early lead. Senior linebacker Tevin Jones made an impressive sack for a loss of 13 yards, which really disrupted the repetitive Simmons’ offense. After several failed drives from both sides it was made clear that the first quarter did nothing to break the deadlock between the two powerhouse teams of the Division III American Southwest Conference. The second quarter started off with a bang for Hardin-Simmons as the Cowboys finally found the end zone in a well-run ground assault. With that the Cowboys drew first blood and took the score to 0-7. The Crusaders could not come up with a suitable comeback as the score remained the same for most of the second quarter. That is not to say that the Crusaders did not try to get on the board. Freshmen running back Jo’Vel McDaniel, on one play, went as far as to completely jump over a defender in order to gain a few yards. With only a few minutes left on the clock for the first half, senior QB Jase Hammack connected to senior WR Jonel Reed for a diving catch into the end zone. This catch finally put the Crusaders on the board. However, a missed P.A.T failed to make it a tied game. As both teams jogged into the locker rooms for halftime the score was Crusaders 6, Cowboys 7. The third quarter continued much like the rest of the game, with both teams failing to score more points up on the board. While the Crusaders failed many times to get into the end zone, they did manage to properly execute several laterals for a gain of a few yards each time and...

Read More

Welcome Week: Students celebrate return to school after summer ends

The entering Class of 2023 showed its joyous character right away as the freshmen brought an energy and excitement rivaling a major sporting event to this year’s Welcome Week at UMHB. During the initial move-in on Aug. 21, King Street was filled with smiles, cheering, shouting and extra energy. The first sight that freshmen were treated to was that of the Color Leaders, who would lead all of the competitive Color Clash events between campus dorms. They helped greet and move the freshmen into their dorms. Carloads of people were greeted with signs that said “Welcome Home,” while throngs of professors and student leaders, and even University President Randy O’Rear rushed to the cars to help incoming students and their parents. They first greeted students and parents, and then helped to unload their vehicles and haul students’ belongings up to their new rooms, where many would meet their roommates for the first time. Though their roommates came from far and wide, various events that the freshmen attended throughout the week seemed to instill a sense of camaraderie. This year, students and faculty joined the university this year from as far away as California to the island nation of Sri Lanka. Dr. Sriyan Wickramasuriya, the latest addition to the Math Department from Sri Lanka, was one of the people who made this Welcome Week extra special by joining in with other faculty and staff to help move students onto campus with his contagious energy. “I heard at the orientation that people volunteer for it, so I was very excited to help,” Wickramasuriya said. Making an outstanding influence on the next generation of UMHB students was an evident goal, and an unspoken theme of each interaction throughout the week as CRU Leaders, Color Leaders and event organizers shared many life-changing moments with the freshmen. Moving from California to attend UMHB, freshman Christian ministry major Daniel Richardson said that his most memorable moment of Welcome Week was when he visited his CRU Leader’s home. “Our CRU Group Leader had us all over to her house and she made spaghetti, and we just talked and played games,” Richardson said. Organizers feel that times like these, while simple, are unique to this specific Welcome Week group, and can have a transformative effect. Senior Lauren Murray, who was a co-director of this year’s Welcome Week, credited her desire to become involved with the event to her previous mentors from her own Welcome Week as an incoming freshman. “I wanted to be co-director for Welcome Week because of the example that [has] been set before me by upperclassman,” Murray said. “I think that UMHB does a really...

Read More