FYC hosts “Back to the Formal”
Apr24

FYC hosts “Back to the Formal”

Multicolored lights, disco balls and a vintage photo booth were just a few characteristics featured at the “Back to the Future” themed formal held in Temple’s Main Street Hall on Saturday evening, April 6. The formal was raised two stories high and was decked out with an array of decorations that acknowledged the different decades of the past, present and future. First Year Collective hosts this annual event. FYC is a campus organization that provides a place of fellowship for first year students through leadership, community service, spiritual growth and school spirit. The formal has a different creative theme every year, and this year topped the rest with its expressive theme that shows off how unique our students can really get. Each student came out dressed to impress in outfits that represented different decades and their most popular fashion statements, some styled in tutu skirts and neon leggings to represent the 80s and others in bell bottom jeans and flower crowns to bring a bit of the 70s into the mix. The disco ball lit the floor as students danced the night away with their peers. The area was filled with crowd surfing, eating and tons of laughter, and the vintage photo booth captured the memories of friends and their blast to the past. “This was my last year to attend (Formal), so I really wanted to go and experience my last formal… I really liked the photo booth that they had this year,” said Jimmy Boutte, a senior education major. “I also liked the ‘Back to the Future’ theme. They even had old movies playing on the projector, which was really cool,” Boutte said. Formal was a great way to relax and have a good time with the semester coming to an end. The students at the dance each attended for a variety of reasons, whether it was to show off their rad style, display their great dance moves or just to hang out with their friends. They all can agree that “Back to the Formal” was a night to...

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League Cru hosts Play Night
Apr24

League Cru hosts Play Night

League Cru has had yet another successful year with their annual Play Night. The night before UMHB’s annual Play Day, the organization typically hosts a game night in Bawcom Student Union that features video games, board games and food. League Cru is about leisurely and competitive gaming with one another, and their mission is to promote the rise of esports, a form of organized multiplayer video game competition. “The League Cru and Cru Engineering have mutual members between each organization, and a lot of our members were coming to participate in the activities tonight, so Ifigured it would be greatto come and have fun with our members or just to help out,” said sophomore Isaac Newton, President of Cru Engineering. The night kicked off with an icebreaker scavenger hunt between new- comers and frequent participants. In order to win the game, a person had to find others that matched the description on a card. Next came a computer gaming competition. “I enjoy the competitive gaming in general; it’s fun to just come to a place and compete against people that are interested in the same things as you,” said Martinus Counts, a psychology major. League Cru’s Play Night featured a friendly atmosphere that welcomed all types of students who have a passion for gaming with...

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Faculty spotlight: Brandon Skaggs
Mar20

Faculty spotlight: Brandon Skaggs

Dr. Brandon Skaggs strongly advocates getting involved in campus activities. This comes from someone who was very involved in his own student career. When he attended UMHB as an undergraduate, he was Student Body President in 2003 while being involved in multiple organizations. “Every student should be involved in some sort of co-curricular experience, because it just helps them develop as a person,” Skaggs said. Some of the other activities and organizations Skaggs was involved with while at UMHB included Welcome Week, Student Government Association and Campus Activities Board, as well as Stunt Night and Crusader Knights. Now Vice President of Student Life at the University of Mary Hardin- Baylor, he works hard to help students get involved on campus. “We want to provide students with an experience outside of the classroom that can help you grow as a leader, a businessman or woman, a teacher or a civic leader in whatever community God calls you to,” he said. Dr. Skaggs stays very involved himself, opening his home to students and hosting dinner parties for student organizations such as the Association of Black Students, among others. He attends and plans numerous student led events to ensure that everyone has a safe and good time. He has a lot of support behind him in this effort. “I have a wonderful family that is very supportive, my wife loves the ministry we were called to which is the Mary Hardin-Baylor students, and my kids love being up here as well. You cannot do this job without any of them; they are my biggest supporters,” Skaggs said. Graduating with a double major in Business Management and Computer Information Systems in 2003, Skaggs then went on to earn an MBA in Finance and Management from Tarleton State University and a Doctorate in Higher Education Leadership from Dallas Baptist University. He began his career as Director of Admissions Recruitment at DBU, which led him to work as the Associate Vice President for Student Development and Dean of Students at Oklahoma Baptist University before coming home to UMHB. It seems that he brought back to UMHB that involvement and inspiration he had as a leading undergraduate. “Working alongside Dr. Brandon Skaggs has been a delight. I see his desire to “work at all things as if working for the Lord,” Yvette Shackelford, Administrative Assistant to Dr. Skaggs, said. “He has an ability to bring out the best in everyone that works alongside him. It has been a complete joy and blessing to work alongside...

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Black History Perspectives Lecture provides insight on civil rights issues

Drs. Kerry Owens and Christine Nix held the Black History Perspectives Lecture in Manning Chapel on Wednesday, Feb. 20. The purpose of the lecture was to gain insight from the perspectives of an African-American speaker as well as a white speaker. The two professors did their best to give the audience members a visual of their thoughts and experiences. The lecture focused on the history of slavery, segregation and racial inequality that the African-American community has experienced. The lecture began with Dr. Owens delivering a speech on his perspective as an outsider looking in. As a white man, Owens gave his opinion on the civil rights movement, affirmative action and inequality within the judicial system. He said that our country needs to unite and do more to solve our civil rights issues and our continued inequality. “In America, we are only as free as we can afford to be.” Owens said. He delivered useful information that the audience may not have previously considered. The second portion of the lecture, given by Dr. Christine Nix, was also informative and insightful. As an African-American women, Nix took a more personal route with her lecture by answering questions from students. Nix discussed her childhood, career, family and social life. Dr. Nix was the first and only female African-American Texas Ranger, and although she faced several trials and tribulations, she remained determined. “I was not only holding the door, I’m opening it for someone else,” Nix said. During Nix’s lecture, she stressed how important it is for society to lose the “it’s all about us and it’s all about them mentality.” According to Nix, we all need to be unified and learn how to be civil. This is what will create a better world. Nix ended her lecture by stressing the importance of education. “You can be whatever you want, but you have to have an education,” Nix said. This lecture showed that in order to be in a civilized world, we all have to be civil. Respect is never given: we must earn it. Alongside these key points, Nix focused on breaking stereotypes and using your inspirations. Both Nix and Owens delivered insightful lectures that empowered listeners to take...

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UMHB celebrates Black History Month
Feb13

UMHB celebrates Black History Month

Diverse cultural backgrounds, ethnicities and mixed races have been a true pride of the UMHB family. As February is Black History month, UMHB is finding unique and inclusive ways to celebrate the historical month. Black History Month is an annual celebration that occurs every February in honor of African-Ameri- cans and their past, present and future achievements. It has been 93 years since Black History Month was first recognized as a national holiday in the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland. When it first began, it was only a week-long celebration held on the second week of the month, coinciding with the week that Abraham Lincoln abolished slavery in 1865. Kicking off the month is an art exhibit held by UMHB’s art department. The “Black to the Future” art exhibit, curated by seniors Chriscina Lampkin and Danielle Demetria, features artwork created by African-American students majoring and minoring in art. The exhibit will be featured in Baugh Center for the Visual Arts on Feb. 14 at 5 p.m. Dani- elle Demetria East, a senior whose artwork will be displayed, is excited that UMHB is put- ting on this event to honor Black His- tory Month. “I have a sculpture in the show. It’s called ‘She’s Gotta Have It’, East said. “I went around UMHB and got different black women to write on these cement blocks about their perspective as a woman of color.” The English department is also participating in the month’s celebrations by hosting its third annual Black History Month Creative Writing Contest. Students can submit works of poetry, fiction and nonfiction. A panel of writers will deliver their creative pieces in McLane Great Hall on Feb. 13 at 2:30 p.m. In addition to activities at UMHB this February, The Association of Black Students (ABS) attended the 31st Southwestern Black Student Leadership Conference, which was held at Texas A&M in College Station from Jan. 17-19. The conference focused on empowerment and leadership. Jason Kontchou, a junior at Texas A&M and the Co-Executive Chair of the SBSLC, attends every year. “I got involved in SBSLC my freshman year,” Kontchou said. “It was supposed to just be something to put on my resume, something to do for fun. However, I quickly realized it was so much more than that. I felt like it gave me a purpose. “It made me feel at home with my school,” he added. “I fell in love after experiencing my first conference and ever since then I’ve just wanted to be more and more involved in the planning and process of the conference, so I applied and got onto the executive...

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