Reaching Out to community
Mar10

Reaching Out to community

A tired student stands among some 50 others in a big room. Their bodies are all weak from having to get up early in the morning, but the donuts and orange juice help to give them the energy they need for the rest of the day. For today, they will be Reaching Out. It is an event that happens once a semester, in which the students help meet the needs of the Belton and Temple areas. Students meet at 8 a.m. in Shelton Theater and are served breakfast before they depart to the many different sites that are available to help the community. Director of Student Organizations Kristy Brischke recognizes the significance of Reaching Out. “Sometimes we get so involved in our own worlds, we forget that there is a much bigger world around us,” Brischke said. Reaching Out helps the UMHB community experience the greater community by giving back “It is a wonderful way for our faculty, staff, and students to connect to the various agencies and organizations that do so much for the area we live in,” she said. Director of Spiritual Life for Student Government Association Zach Raygoza was in charge of putting together Reaching Out. He has added a new site this year to the event. “We are going to Miller Springs to do park clean up, which we have never done before. I am excited because it is not only something for the community but also for the environment,” Raygoza said. SGA has given Raygoza the opportunity to learn how to lead. “It has also been great because I could see the effects of my leadership decisions,” he said. Raygoza incorporates faith into his decision making. “Spiritually, this position has shown me that God is ultimately in control and to not stress about how things will work out,” he said. “Allowing God to move, rather than putting him in a box or getting in the way of what he is doing, is essential.” Junior nursing major Rachel Schofi eld went to the Churches Touching Lives For Christ site. While she was there, she folded clothes so that when people came that needed some, they could find them easier. “I like Reaching Out because it is one Saturday a semester and I get to hang out and enjoy the company of other people and help other people,” Schofield said. “Churches Touching Lives For Christ is a good picture of what the church should be doing. It is meeting the needs of the people.” While Reaching Out may not solve the problems of all the people in the community, it does serve to help the students...

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Comic book series strikes ‘Black’ gold
Oct27

Comic book series strikes ‘Black’ gold

Light can be separated into seven different colors: red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo and violet. In DC comics this has been taken into consideration, and it has helped start the newest incarnation of their series of comic books. DC comics has decided to incorporate the science of light and the spectrum into the Green Lantern: Blackest Night. In the comics, Green Lanterns are a type of space corps, patrolling different sectors of the universe to protect. They have power rings that can project different constructs of light, in this case green, and are powered by the wearers’ willpower. The rings help them enforce law in the universe. Green Lantern: Blackest Night has been anticipated since last year. In the series, all of the past characters who have died (Firestorm, Martian Manhunter, Plastic Man, etc.) have been resurrected as zombies by the villainous Black Hand to put an end to all life in the universe. The series also introduces many other corps, which harness the power of the other colors of the spectrum. For instance, a Blue Lantern powers his rings with hope, a Yellow Lantern with fear, and a Red Lantern with hate. Normally, these different corps are at war with each other, but because of the Blackest Night, they must all work together to stop the Black Lanterns. Geoff Johns came up with the story for the Blackest Night. Johns has been the writer for many other story lines, such as the Justice Society of America, The Flash: Rebirth, Teen Green Lantern: The Sinestro Corps War and Infinite Crisis. He has also been very involved in the making of DC comics characters as they become animated for film and television. He seems to have lots of experience in his line of work, and he has been working with comics since 1999. He began to make a large impact in 2000 when he took over writing The Flash. For Johns to have the idea to use the dead characters as Black Lanterns is genius. These ‘heroes’ have come back to haunt their former friends and partners. Since black is the absence of light, the only way to defeat them is for all of the different corps, who represent the different colors of light, to work together to ‘white out’ the Black Lanterns. This is a great series to get into and has been kept going since Green Lantern: Rebirth back in 2004. Overall, it gets five out of five...

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Design Cru, more than a name
Oct13

Design Cru, more than a name

Students often come to college with artistic talents, but they have no way to express these abilities. Consequently this can take away motivation that they had for going to school in the first place. Now, there is a solution to the problem. The Design Cru exists to give students a means to funnel their gifts for art and graphic design. The organization is made up primarily of students majoring in information technology, graphic design, mass communication and art, but it is open to all students interested in any aspect of graphic design. This includes, but is not limited to, film, web, animation and print. The organization’s faculty sponsor is Donna Teel. She helps the group by assisting, advising and supporting the members in their activities. “I have been affiliated with the club since it was first constituted in 2005,” Teel said. “A computer graphics design (CGD) major Timothy Walker, suggested the club, and under the guidance of Ms. Effel Harper, developed the proposal and spearheaded the beginning of the club.” Last semester, members submitted T-shirt designs to Joy Childress for the parent teacher organization. The winner would receive a purple iPod, with the UMHB logo etched on the back. The Design Cru is always busy making different designs for organizations and events that take place on campus. “Since the organization began, we have welcomed students from all disciples that have had an interest in any aspect of graphic design, computers, art and film,” Teel said. “The club has hosted classes by film and flash animation professionals, had field trips to watch and then discuss current films, taken a group of club members to South by Southwest in Austin, had presentations by students on a variety of topics such as developing and printing T-shirt designs, participated in activities on campus and are always open to suggestions from club members for anything that will help broaden their creativity and design knowledge. We will also be revamping our Web site soon, which should help attract new members.” Senior computer graphics design major Katie Smith is the president of Design Cru. She started working with the organization after hearing her adviser, Teel, speak of it. Smith decided that she wanted to be involved in something that would challenge her as well as encourage her while she is working in her major and discovering what direction to point her career in CGD. “Design Cru is more about bringing in speakers and letting anyone interested know about opportunities to help advertise for a campus event or organization, or pick up a design part time job,” Smith said. “I have had the opportunity to run sound...

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Imagination is used as a tool to transform scrap items into new artwork

Ribbons, thread, a roll of cloth, glue and a photo can all seem to be useless on their own. However, if these assorted items are put together, a wonderful photo collage is made. Craft Cru is an organization on campus that is dedicated to anything handmade. Members do their best to be creative, encourage one another and share new ideas. Students get to use their skills to make colorful art, to decorate their dorm rooms or apartments. It all started in the spring of 2008. Senior computer graphics major and president of Craft Cru Holly Gaskamp had always loved arts and crafts, since she was a child. Gaskamp was given an assignment in which she was to find a blog about something she was interested in. She discovered blogs about little stuffed animals that could be made relatively easy and went to Wal-Mart where she bought a small sewing machine for $20. “I saved up and bought a real sewing machine and taught myself how to use it with the Internet and YouTube videos,” Gaskamp said. “I loved it so much that I looked into other things I could do and thought how fun it would be to have a club where other people could come and make crafts too. The rest is history.” In the past, the organization has taught people how to sew their own pillows and crochet different designs and images. This semester, Craft their crafts and making them on a budget. Their projects, will include turning old CD cases into collages and teaching members how to make ribbon boards with cardboard and old sweatshirts. Junior organismal biology major Mike Kroll is vicepresident of Craft Cru. “What I really like about the group is that we are able to create art through items that many people would either throw away, or not think about using to create something new,” Kroll said, “Crafting also allows people to show their creativity in an incredibly unique and individual way. This way, no two crafts are ever alike.” Craft Cru meets every other week, on Tuesdays at 9 p.m. in the Shannon Commons. Five meetings are planned this semester, as well as two campus-wide events. Information about the organization is sent out through the group on Facebook. Administrative Assistant Joy Childress became the sponsor. This helps the group, as it is in the process of becoming an official, on-campus organization. “They have done a lot of work so far by setting up officers and meetings on their own, and it makes me very excited about being the sponsor for Craft Cru,” Childress to take items and recycle them into fun...

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Servant-hearted students receive awards, money
Sep16

Servant-hearted students receive awards, money

Two students received the Gary and Diane Heavin Servant Leadership Award at Convocation Aug. 28. Seniors Tommy Wilson and Audrey Chumchal were each given $1,000 to give to a non-profi t organization of their choice. The award is for two outstanding students who have given their time and talents as volunteers. They must have accumulated an impressive record of ministry or community service while at the university. International business major, Tommy Wilson, served in Kenya in missions during his freshman and his junior year. He has been involved with Reaching Out, a community service outreach program. In the fall of 2007, he took a group of students to the Beaumont area to clean up and rebuild after Hurricane Ike. He also spent a year in Hong Kong serving as the youth intern for a church. Christian ministry major, Jonathan Dean, who accompanied Wilson to Beaumont said, “Tommy had a great attitude that led everyone to accomplish their goals. He encouraged us to serve and put the needs of others before ours.” Wilson donated his money to Build The Village and Operation H2O, two organizations in Kenya. Build The Village establishes schools, houses and churches, and Operation H2O builds water wells. Wilson said, “…I have personally been there and (I know) the money will be put to good use. I know that through this, the workers can share Christ.” Audrey Chumchal, a biblical studies major, has helped out in the community since coming to UMHB. She has volunteered for Reaching Out and assisted the Federation of Women’s Club in Temple last fall with their fund raising. She was involved in Crusader Knights, Gamma Beta Phi, House Council, Stunt Night and also directed and taught sign language for the Easter Pageant. Chumchal has had a continuing role in the Miss MHB Pageant, been a residence hall assistant in Burt Hall and the Huckins Apartments and served as a University Ambassador. She visited Central Asia this summer for six weeks, worked with missionaries to establish a business platform and built friendships with the people living in the area. “While I was there, I had my eyes opened to the depravity of the world and the need for the truth of the Gospel. I also felt the call to suffer in the same way he did for his Kingdom,” said Chumchal. She has chosen to donate her money to a program called Bibles Unbound, run by the Voice of the Martyrs, which provides Bibles to countries around the world. Chumchal’s friends have taken notice of her spiritual growth and are pleased at what she has achieved so far. Friend J Larkin said, “She...

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