Romney pulls a majority with Cru
Oct16

Romney pulls a majority with Cru

-Analysis- If Mickey Mouse was president of the United States would the world be a better place? The national anthem would no longer be “Oh say can you see…” but “M-I-C-K-E-Y M-O-U-S-E.” Though Mickey was one of the write-in votes for president in The Bells’ recent straw poll, the Republican candidate actually won. If the fate of the nation rested on the shoulders of the 690 UMHB students who participated in the campus unscientific presidential straw poll, Mitt Romney would be the 45th president of the United States. Romney beat President Barack Obama by 236 votes. “Well, it’s not a surprise because it is a conservative school. And I would think that most people in the school would vote for Romney,” senior English major Courtney Kirk said. She is a Democrat who supports Obama. “But one of the things that surprises me, since this is a conservative and Christian school, is some people don’t check facts. Mitt Romney builds his stance on lies, and that’s not Christian-like. A lot of people are not informed, so they just rely on what someone said instead of checking the facts.” Junior Christian studies major Laura Phipps explained that Obama had the vote of the younger generation at one point, but that has now changed. “I definitely think that if you were to ask our campus a couple years ago, it would have been strongly in favor of Obama. But after the last couple of years, and different things that the administration has done, and how the economy has affected college students, I’m not surprised Romney won (the straw poll),” she said. Students in more than 15 majors participated in the presidential poll. After selecting their candidate, they were presented with 11 issues and asked to choose the top three that were most important to them in the election. The U.S. economy was the number one issue while health care, national debt and the unemployment rate came in second, third and fourth. Phipps hopes the former Massachusetts governor will bring different ideas that will fix the nation’s growing economic problems. “I think a new administration is needed. I think that Mitt Romney would be able to give us some fresh innovation and incentive on the unemployment and economy so there is hope for our generation, and there are jobs waiting for us, and we can improve unemployment,” she said. Kirk supports Obama’s campaign to jump start the economy and ensure health care is provided for everyone. “I feel that Obama has tried to do a lot of things, but he’s being knocked down constantly. Then people like to blame him when things don’t...

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Pop culture is theme for student art

The annual student art competition has come and gone, but the art still lingers. “Red Riding Hood,” “Dazed and Confused” and “Katy Perry,” along with many others can be found on display in the second floor of the library. Senior studio art major Joanne Cervantes won the competition with her artwork entitled “LJ Whiteleg.” She recently made a dramatic change in her creative style after having artist block for a year, so the victory was satisfying to her. “The reason I felt good about winning this time is because this work is so different from what I have done before.  My heart is really in this 100 percent,” she said. “I could have done my old style, but my heart just wasn’t in it. So for me to win first place in this new work, it just solidified in my mind that I am moving in the right direction. And it’s gratifying to see that other people can see what I see in it.” Cervantes described finding her inspiration in unusual things. “I see the beauty in junk. I wanted to do drawings from life. So I go out to the farm, and I just get around the horses, and work with whatever’s there. And to me that’s beautiful. It’s a very unpretentious environment, so there’s a lot of beauty in that. Just whatever’s around me,” she said. For sophomore Christian ministry major Jennifer Settles, the artwork is a refreshing change of scenery while doing studies in the library. “They should have this up here all the time because I like looking at it. I guess I just didn’t realize how many different kinds of art there is. Whenever I need a break from my studies, I can just gaze into the art,” she said. This year 75 pieces were entered, and only 29 were accepted for the competition. Submissions were open to anyone who is currently enrolled in an art class or who has taken an art class within the past year. First, second and third places were awarded, along with honorable mention. Professor and Art Department Chair Hershall Seals had encouraging words for those whose work is not on display. “The competition is always risky if you have your ego involved, but everyone has to understand that one judge’s opinion is one judge’s opinion. And you just have to be stubborn enough to keep entering, and eventually something will be accepted for exhibition,” he said. Cervantes, whose art is often misinterpreted, explained that fear can never be an option for any aspiring artist. She said, “Don’t ever be afraid to look stupid because you’re probably going to...

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Lights, Camera, Cru Film
Mar06

Lights, Camera, Cru Film

The cast and crew of the spring Cru Film are making movie magic by bringing to life a true story of sorrow, heartache, disappointment and revelations. Starring and written and directed by university students, The Walk tells a tale of Kenzie, a bride-to-be whose heart is in despair because of an absentee father. As her walk down the aisle approaches, she fears her fiance will abandon her as her dad did. She soon learns to trust in God, let go of her past and walk with faith into matrimony. Senior performance studies and English major Kelsey Broussard wrote the screenplay based on her personal experiences. She said the first half of the movie “is very much a true story, my true story. As I was watching the actors in the early scenes, it was as if I was reliving my childhood. I teared up several times as the pain of disappointment permeated my memories.  I was completely humbled.” Broussard conveyed the problems she faced growing up in a single-parent home and how her struggles sparked an idea, which manifested itself into a storyline — now a movie. She hopes the film encourages those who have faced the same obstacles to seek refuge in the Lord. “There are several people who have daddy issues, and you hear that testimony of how (they) just went to (their) heavenly father instead of earthly one,” she said. “It was my revelation that God is not limited to being a heavenly father or a friend. He’s all these things and so much more.” Similar to the main character in the movie, Broussard learned to let go of her past as she walked into her future. “I’m very grateful for the hand that I have been given. I know that things worked out the way it did, and I am the person that I am because of that,” she said. Transforming a true story on a script to film required the right direction. Senior communication major and film minor Chris Collins was chosen to lead the crew and direct the film. He described the dynamics of capturing the drama of the movie. “I kind of wanted the beginning of the film to be seen through the child’s eyes. I wanted to highlight how children are victims because they don’t understand why their mother and father are not together anymore,” Collins said. “This film shows the emotional stress that a child goes through starting at a young age, and 15 years later she’s still struggling with these issues.” Collins praised the cast and crew for the hard work and dedication they put into the making of...

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Writer’s Festival inspires more than poetry

The 2012 Writer’s Festival brought authors from all around the country together. Combining poetry, prose and art, the festival ran Feb. 9-11  and featured celebrated authors such as Dan Taylor, Brett Foster and Susanna Childress as well as student authors. Assistant Professor of English Dr. Jessica Hooten spearheaded the festival and expected it to have a positive impact on students and others who attended. “I was hoping that students would be exposed to great writing, that their assumptions about literature may be overturned, and that perhaps they would be inspired by the beauty of poetry,” she said. Hooten was pleased with the outcome of the festival but hopes future festivals will get more recognition and support. She said, “I think UMHB has a larger opportunity with the festival than they realize. Thankfully, some professors recognized the value of the festival and brought whole classes. However, every department across campus should be coming. The auditorium should be filled at every session, and we should have students in awe of what they have just experienced.” Junior English major Courtney Kirk is one of those crusaders that describes what Hooten  wished. She attended and  was amazed with keynote speaker. “I did hear Dr. Al Haley’s work, and I thought it was pretty exceptional. I really liked his work a great deal. It was vivid; it was full of imagery. I could understand it; it wasn’t elevated speech. It was full of drama, and it wasn’t stilted. I liked it a lot,” she said. Kirk was also impressed with Haley’s humbleness and the realness his work represented. She described the authenticity of his performance. “Even though this is a Christian setting, he didn’t pull any punches. He told it how it is. He talked about everyday situations, and I can appreciate that,” she said. “Another thing was his address, his approach to reading his work; it was    exceptional.” Kirk hopes the festivals in years to come will expand and not just focus on a few genres of writing. “If you’re trying to produce writers, great writers, you have to realize that everyone is not going to write in that genre of Christian works. Everyone is not geared up on that,” Kirk said. “So we need to have different writer styles, and I think that needs to be pushed. I think that would really help the     students.” Laughter filled the room on opening night of the festival as professors, students and guests of the campus took their turn and expressed themselves with poetry and scripts during Open Mic Night. Hooten said, “Sharing poetry, songs and prose pieces used to be common; now we have...

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Spiritual hymn has a deeper meaning

A good song always tells a story. Dr. George Harrison, director of Digital Media Services/ Cultural Affairs,gave a presentation telling the story of the spiritual hymn “Glory Glory Hallelujah.” The Feb. 9 College of Christian Studies forum, which recognized Black History month, revealed the song was composed by slaves and each word held a significant meaning. Harrison said, “There are a few that know the origin and the background of the story. This is a song sung by slaves that witnessed. It is an announcement to fellow slaves and to slave owners professing that I’m no longer what I was. They have laid down their burdens and decided to become a Christian. This is a total commitment to my new God.” Harrison, who has studied most church development in the black community and African gods, dissected and explained each verse in detail. The words , “I feel better, so much better, since I laid my burden down,” was a request from one slave to another to convert to Christianity. “This is an invitation to others saying you need to come to Christ, and you need to be a part of what I’m part of. And other slaves watched those slaves that claim to be saved to see if their lives change. So you had to be appealing and you had to do things that were good and kind,” Harrison explained. The third verse, “My friends don’t treat me like they used to since I lay my burdens down,” showed evidence of how other slaves treated those who chose God over the African gods. “This is a fight between two different opposing groups, Christians and non-Christians,” he said. Harrison said many of the tests that slaves faced when they liberated themselves from their African tribal gods, are the same tests Christians face today. “It was a statement of new birth confronting all belief once held so closely to them. Kind of sounds like our lives. Sometimes, we always want to go back to what we’re used to, and it’s difficult to make the decision to put something away and to gain something. This type of disciple power has changed the life of many.” Harrison extended his lecture from slavery to the present. Covering issues such as segregation of schools in the South, the Voting Rights Act and the civil rights movement. The topic changed during a discussion period. Mike Bergman, executive director of the non-profit organization, Helping Hands said, “We’re some 50 years plus past the civil rights movement, and we still hear this statement that 11 o’clock on Sunday morning is the most segregated hour in our country. What...

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