Bollywood: A genre of music growing in popularity
Apr24

Bollywood: A genre of music growing in popularity

Bollywood music is an acquired taste. With foreign sounds and an unidentifiable language, it can be something to get used to. However, in some respects, it gives an understanding of a different    culture. With ornate costumes that are a mixture of western dance moves and clothing, Bollywood has become more popular today than ever before. With the combination of the terms “Hollywood” and “Bombay,” the music is integrated into Hindi movies. What does that mean exactly? It means that every couple of minutes, a song-and-dance sequence will be brought forth to go along with the current scene.  So if there is happiness, there is a song. If the moment is sad, there is a song. Is it like American Broadway shows? No, not necessarily. Broadway shows consist  mostly of singing. Bollywood songs occur after roughly 30 or 40 minutes of dialogue. The Hindi film industry releases the most movies per year than any other country, according to the Guinness Book of World Records. Thus, there is a movie album (or two)  released roughly every two weeks. Each album has five to 11 songs and will most likely include remixes. As other countries attempt to be more westernized, India is no different, with American dance steps included in songs and an all-too-familiar sound of some instruments, like drums, guitar and the piano. Liking Bollywood music may be easier than you think. It has progressively become more American, and now the music is a mixture of pop, rock, R&B and hip-hop. This popular music genre is slowly turning international. With Middle Eastern countries and European countries now turning their ears to Bollywood music, America is next in line. Even Hollywood has turned its head toward Hindi film music It is just like American tunes when it comes to music. A bad break-up? There is a song for that. Falling in love? Plenty of songs for that. Relationship highs and lows? There are songs for that. The familiar sounds of guitars, drums and keyboard will frequently be used. However, the lesser known noises of the dhol (type of drum) and the sitar (stringed instrument) will be unfamiliar but equally interesting. Therefore, the musical fusion of two different nations provides a unique sound that can positively grab attention. With Bollywood movies now having to appeal to a “desi” audience (Indians born in America), there is nothing that will stop the Indian music industry from grabbing their attention and appealing to that target market niche. They will go after American singers/songwriters to be a part of Bollywood tunes.  And they already have Snoop Dog, Ludacris, Akon and Drake, artists who have sung in Bollywood...

Read More
Man who brought Chick-fil-A cow to life visits UMHB
Apr24

Man who brought Chick-fil-A cow to life visits UMHB

As the audience took their seats in the Mayborn Campus Center, all eyes were glued on the celebrity of the day­­– McLane Lecture speaker Stan Richards, head of the Richards Group in Dallas. The program started with a brief introduction and a light history on the lectures. The business themed speeches have been presented by many professionals, including former President George H.W. Bush. It  took a surprise turn when University President Randy O’Rear mentioned a new award. Although this was not on the program, O’Rear felt it was appropriate to present an award called the John and Mary Hardin Visionary Leadership Award. This title was given because of the Hardin couple who rescued the University when it was in its deepest financial pit. They generously gave $100,000 donation, which is equivalent to $10.7 million today. O’Rear said, “They literally saved Mary Hardin-Baylor.” In like manner, Elizabeth and Drayton McLane Jr. have set a new record by giving the  largest single financial donation in UMHB history. Therefore, it is fitting that the McLanes be the first to recieve the award. After expressing  gratitude for the award, Drayton McLane Jr. introduced Richards. From there, Richards talked about his memorable journey through advertising. The executive has saved many businesses from failing. For instance, Fruit of the Loom was in the midst of bankruptcy when Richards and his team persisted in bringing back the Fruit of the Loom men. What are the results? A comedic commercial of men singing “You can’t over love your underwear.” Another very famous company is Motel 6. Richards transformed the stigma of a less than top-notch motel into a new perspective of comfort and cleanliness. One of his most popular campaigns is Chick-fil-A. As a result of the genius marketing technique known as the Chick-fil-A cows, the fast food chain began to see dramatic results. Richards said that McDonald’s individual stores have an average sale of $2 million. Chick-fil-A restaurants earn an average of $6 million, and that is strictly working six days with no dollar menus or discounts. As these are great marketing strategies and achievements for his company, they are not the things he is most proud of. At his company, he said, “No one has a title. It implies that some people are more important than others.” As a result, The Richards Group has a high employee retention rate and was voted one of the best places to work in the Dallas/Fort Worth area. From starting in his garage to being one of the top advertisers in America and having a company that has been named America’s best creative agency, Stan Richards has it all....

Read More

Commuting faculty and staff adjust to rising gas prices and other variables

With so many drivers on the road and more construction happening on I-35, commuting has become more difficult for the university’s professors and staff. How do they adjust to challenges and make  ends-meet? For executive assistant Phyllis Rogers, the best way is to live in Belton during the week and return to her hometown of Bryan during the weekends. She has an apartment a few miles away from campus and lives in the Central Texas area Monday through Friday                         afternoon. Rogers did try to work in College Station for a little while, but she had a change of heart. “I tried to go back. I took a job at CS….But I missed this place so much. I just got home sick. I came back….,” she said. Once you’re here, there’s just not a better place.” Weekly commuting has been her routine for almost six years now, and she does not mind. Rogers did attempt to drive to and from Belton for work every day, but it only lasted for two days. She said, “My husband did mention one time to live in Bryan and just drive back and forth. I was just on the road all the time. I didn’t get to spend time with my     husband.” University Chaplain Dr. George Loutherback, a Waco resident, said one of the variables that has changed for him is a car.  Because of knee pains of driving a lower car, Loutherback purchased an SUV. “It sets me up higher. It’s a lot less stress on my knees,” he said. Loutherback used to spend many nights in Belton during major events like Welcome Week and Revival. However, there was just one problem. He said, “I sleep better in my own bed. So I make the trip back home even though it’s late.” Psychology Professor, who lives near Moody, Cecilia Erlund, addresses one of the major concerns: gas. Like other professors, it is a burden to fill up frequently. She said, “There is stress having to fill up so often. I used to not think about it too much. But now, I do just like everyone else. I’m constantly watching who has a good price today.” Not only that, but because of traffic, more signal lights and speed limit changes, Erlund’s 18-mile drive takes longer than ever. She said, “When I first started … it was about a 20-minute drive and now it’s about a 35- minute drive.” Loutherback and Erlund both look at the positive side  and suggest an advantage to commuting. “Gives me time to think and process,” Erlund said. Loutherback said, “Gives me a time to process …. I do a...

Read More

Multi-cultural couple takes classes to learn each other’s language

Love has no barriers, especially for two people who were raised in completely different cultures, but have the magic of love that keeps them together and inspires them to grow their marriage. Tom and Lisa McKague are a couple who met online. Lisa was born and raised in China, and Tom was a typical American businessman. Because they don’t know each other’s language well, they’ve enrolled in classes, Tom at UMHB and Lisa at First Baptist Church Belton. Lisa did not know English when she first began to write to Tom, so she had someone else perform the task. She said she wrote in Chinese, and her sister’s colleague would translate it from Chinese to English for her. After about four months, Tom went to China to meet the person on the other side of the world. He would make those trips another three times as interest developed. Even though Lisa spoke little English, and Tom did not know much Chinese, there seemed to be an instant connection. They got married in China, but the struggle to be in America and to adapt became a challenge. Even though they had a ceremony, their marriage was not official in America until a year later. Tom and Lisa have been married for two years, and Lisa is finding it difficult to adjust, but she is making it work. One of the ideas the couple had was going to language classes. They attend the English as a Second Language classes  at First Baptist Church in Belton, so Lisa can better her English. Tom goes to a Chinese language class at UMHB taught by good friend and special education graduate major Yifang Chen. Chen first met Tom and Lisa at FBC during an ESL session. Their relationship grew from acquaintances to friends when Lisa needed assistance from Chen. “She (Lisa) wanted to learn how to drive. So they asked me to find the Chinese translation of the driver’s license manual,” she said. It was through these sessions at ESL classes that Chen, Tom and Lisa became great friends. When Tom first heard Chen was giving free classes at the university, he decided to join. Not only would this help him learn Chinese, but it was a way to have a stronger relationship with his wife. Tom’s amazement of the Asian culture started before he ever met his wife. “I think it’s fascinating how old it is …. 5,000 years ago the Chinese were eating with sticks, and the rest of us were still eating with our hands,” he said. The former translator is glad that the couple comes to the classes and believes...

Read More

Musician pours out soul in lyrics inspired by religion and politics

An abrupt lyrical volcano comes flowing out with lava consisting of social injustice and spiritual doubts. With hot pains bursting through, solo singer and song writer, David Bazan, sang his viewpoint of religion and social politics at a campus concert. Former band member of Pedro the Lion, Bazan is an indie rock musician with hit albums titled Curse Your Branches and Strange Negotiations. Even though he is not technically classified as a Christian artist, Bazan writes about the spiritual journey and deep theological struggles Christians face today. With soulful songs that penetrate deep and resonate with young amateur artists today, the singer, whether he knows it or not, is inspiring up-and-coming lyricists. Associate Professor and department chair of music Dr. Mark Humphrey is a believer and is impressed with Bazan, who commits to telling his truth in a deep and powerful way. Humphrey said, “No matter what angle he approaches  … from, I always know that his lyrics are going to be thoughtful. He’s going to approach it. He’s not just going to throw things out. He’s going to think things through.” The concert started with the artist playing two songs. With a combination of sweet melody and piercing words, the music is hard to swallow.  Each lyrical bite had to be taken one by one. After Bazan’s performance, there was a Q-and-A interview done by Humphrey. Through the questions, the audience learned of the singer’s struggles of being raised by evangelical parents and slowly walking away from his faith as he progressively matured into an adult. Even though it was a grieving point, he still holds Christianity near and dear to his heart because it was a part of his childhood. He said, “I still feel a kinship with these people. I care for what happens in that world.” As music fans and interested listeners hear his songs, they notice a common thread that brings the whole message together. Bazan said he “aims to set the imbalance of justice in society…. We’re trying to tell the truth about something, and that’s provocative.” One of the many strange things Bazan noticed is the attention he receives from the Christian audience. Christianity Today magazine named Curse Your Branches as one of the best Christian records in 2009. Junior church music major Jonathan Mayo entered the session knowing only a few things about Bazan but walked away with a better understanding of writing lyrics. He said the event “gave a deeper meaning when writing songs….You can have that little snippet of something that you really love, and you can turn it into that song that has deep meaning.”...

Read More
Page 1 of 212