Holocaust exhibit visits Bell County
Jan28

Holocaust exhibit visits Bell County

The Holocaust Museum in Washington D.C. has presented the Bell County Museum with the opportunity to host the first traveling exhibit west of the Mississippi River. UMHB and the museum are partnering together to encourage students and residents of Belton to attend the exhibit. Dr. Timothy Crawford, the Dean of the College of Christian Studies brought the idea of hosting the exhibit to the museum’s curator, Beverly Headley. “We were honored to help out by bringing [the exhibit] to the UMHB community, the Bell County Museum, and the Belton area.” said Headley. “It’s a great reminder that we must study history. We need to understand not only what happened, but why it was allowed to happen. It raises fundamental issues about human nature, social responsibility and the obligation of individuals and institutions to act with a conscience in the face of unspeakable crimes.” The exhibit, Deadly Medicine: Creating the Master Race, discusses the medical and scientific studies of the Holocaust. This exhibit examines how the Nazi’s thought about genetics and used leadership and science to help justify persecution and murder. “This exhibit is a really good answer to the question why did the Holocaust happen?” Crawford said. “The terms ‘racially fit’ and ‘the cleansing of Germany’ was often used to explain to the German citizens why these atrocities were the right things to do.” The museum shows advertisements that were posted all around the country about how unethical it was for “racially fit Germans” to marry or procreate with “non-Germans.” And race wasn’t the only thing that Germany wanted to exterminate from family trees. Homosexuals, the handicapped, and the mentally ill were also considered to have “bad genetics.” A small number of artifacts are also located in the museum showing Nazi supporters personal items. “Deadly Medicine is a reminder that it has happened in the past and it is a history we should not repeat.” said. The exhibit is sectioned into two parts. On the first floor of the museum, guests can see sciences and experiments that took place before World War II began, focusing on creating the “perfect race.” Guests can also see the famous scientists that were used as inspiration for the experiments, such as Gregory Mendel and Charles Darwin, as well as the scientists that played important roles in the experiments, such as Dr. Ernst Rudin. There are many videos that play among the exhibit to show viewers what types of tools that were used, footage of results, and small biographies of different scientists. The second floor of the museum discusses what happened once World War II began. It depicts the victims of the illegal experiments,...

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College republicans start new organization
Dec08

College republicans start new organization

The College Republicans are back, and ready to educate voters on the political issues of the day. The club was originally started three years ago, but couldn’t find its momentum. Recently the organization was brought back to campus and students are excited to see its return. “When I heard they were bringing it back I thought, I want to get it done, I want to make it happen. I went to Sheryl Garza, our supervisor, and asked what I can do to help,” said senior economics major and organization president Collin Cavendish. The politically focused club hopes to help young voters on campus find their political identity so they know exactly why they vote for a cetain party or candidate, and know exactly what policies are most important to them. “For a lot of people on campus this will be the first election they will be voting in,” Cavendish said. “To think your vote doesn’t matter or won’t count for anything is scary. I want to raise awareness that the policies will effect you and it does matter. It is important to get to the polls and vote.” At the interest meeting on Nov. 19, the officers introduced the plan for the organization’s future. Many ideas are still in discussion, and the officers are allowing members to partake in the discussions by expressing their opinions as well. During the meeting, the organization’s officers brought in three guest speakers to talk to the students. Michael Ball, senior director of UMHB, was the first guest speaker to talk to the group. He talked about the upcoming election and the campaigns he had been a part of in the past. “Your ability to influence is greater now than ever,” Ball said. He explained that our votes do directly affect us even though we might not see the effect. The next guest speaker was Henry Garza, the current Bell County District Attorney. Garza talked about his previous experiences with Republican campaigns and creating your political identity is more important than ever. He explained to the viewers that politics are not bad, but they can be difficult. Michael James, who is a chairman of the Young Republicans in Bell County also spoke during the meeting. James talked about how UMHB represents a unique demographic “What I mean by that is, You are the majority,” James said. Freshman nursing major, Mackenzie Henderson, attended to gain a better understanding of how she can be a part of the political process. “I wanted to come so I can be informed further about political issues and develop friendships with other Republicans.” Freshman political science major, Tyler Baker, also...

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Wind ensemble plays life in concert
Nov19

Wind ensemble plays life in concert

Dozens of students, alumni, and relatives gathered to hear a performance by UMHB’s wind ensemble, Nov. 10 in McLane Great Hall. Band Director Nils Landsberg said the theme of the concert was the ups and downs of life, and he chose pieces that symbolized different stages of life from birth to retirement. Each piece represented a moment in life–from the momentous to the somewhat awkward. The band began the concert with with Frank Ticheli’s Joy Revisited (2005). The piece was written to celebrate the birth of the composer’s newborn son. It was a beautiful and celebratory piece that was upbeat and pleasant. The band then played Rollo Takes a Walk (1980) by David Maslanka, which was written about being a child and becoming an adult and the awkwardness of adolescence. The piece was followed by Richard Wagner’s ‘Elsa’s Procession to the Cathedral’ from Lohengrin (1848), which used an operatic style to portray commitment and marriage. The next musical piece was Joel Puckett’s Avelynn’s Lullaby (2011), which was originally written to help the composer’s child get to sleep. There were peaceful moments followed by fast-paced melodies to show the baby fighting the slumber. Then there was an eventual slowing down of the tempo to let the audience know the child was succumbing to sleep. The last piece was another work from David Maslanka called Traveler (2003), which was written to symbolize the retirement of Ray C. Linckenwater. He was a professor whose band students composed the piece in honor of his retirement. “My favorite part about being in the wind ensemble is that you get challenged on more than just an academic level,” said freshman marketing major, Sara Garcia, who plays the french horn in the ensemble. Although she enjoyed playing all of the pieces, one song stuck out to her. “I think [Traveler] is the coolest song ever. Every different instrument has a highlight moment. It’s really busy it’s really fun and I think it’s a great piece.” Senior nursing major Kristina Borhne described the performance as a memorable showcase of an ensemble with a lot of talent. “The beginning and the end were excellent. They always go out with a bang,” Borhne said. Band alumni Kacie Jumper also attended the concert and enjoyed hearing those who followed in her footsteps. “I love being able to come back and see how the band has grown from when I was here,” Jumper said. “It makes me proud to come from...

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Week reflects on missionaries’ stories
Oct29

Week reflects on missionaries’ stories

Missionaries who are serving all over the world converged on campus Oct. 19-23 during Missions Emphasis Week. The week included events and seminars whose purpose was to connect missionaries and students. One of these seminars was called “Latte for the Lord” and was led by Susan and Kelly Curry. In 1996, the Currys created a coffee shop called An Tobar Nua in Galway, Ireland. They were nicknamed ‘The Jesus people’ by the locals and have worked hard to create relations with the people of Galway. “They didn’t trust us for a long time… they thought we were a cult. They thought we were going to pull them away from the Catholic Church,” Kelly Curry had said, “In the beginning it was so slow and we played monopoly in the afternoon because no one was there.” Kelly told a story of how a woman had come to them with her husband who was suffering from depression. The couple had taken a three-hour bus ride to get to the coffee shop, where they were prayed over by the staff for at least an hour. After three weeks Kelly called to check up on the man and found out that after 11 years his depression broke on the bus ride home. Junior Elementary Education major Beth Ann Earley was particularly moved by the Curry’s story and said she knows mission work is in her future. “I personally feel called to missions. I have always found other cultures interesting and there are so many human rights needs around the world,” Early said. “People don’t have the things that we have and we can do something about it.” The missionaries were also invited to speak to classes throughout the week. A young missionary spoke to Sara Billingsley’s literature class, and the junior Christian studies major was inspired by what he said. “[The missionary] graduated from UMHB and he came and talked about his Journeyman term. He served in Nepal and worked on sharing the gospel to unreached people groups,” Billingsley said, “It was encouraging to meet someone who graduated from UMHB who decided to commit to mission work. It was nice to get some advice on that kind of stuff.” Baptist Student Ministry Director Shawn Shannon said MEW raises awareness about the need, opportunity, purposefulness, and joy of missions. “We pray for missionaries to be in transforming conversations that help others connect their personal vocations,” she said. “We seek opportunities for missionaries to engage in relationships with students, staff, faculty, and local churches.” Some of the events on campus were the glow run, girls/boys night out, coffee house, the world market, and the prayer...

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Red Bus Project ‘on the move for orphans’
Oct14

Red Bus Project ‘on the move for orphans’

Dozens of students crowded around a red double decker bus that was parked outside the Bawcom Student Union Building. The large vehicle is called the Red Bus Project, and its purpose is to attract students to buy items for sale and spread awareness about orhan care. The project is a mobile thrift store that travels from different college campuses, spreading awareness about the more than 140 million orphans around the world in need of hope. Their mission is to give the college students a chance to help by buying clothes at reasonable prices and donating clothes they have outgrown or no longer need. The money made is solely given to an orphan care system called Share Hope. Share Hope is the main base of the organization and is run by Steven Curtis Chapman and his wife Mary Beth Chapman. Their daughter, Emily Chapman, was attending Baylor University when she came up with the idea to get college students involved with helping orphans. Chapman and her family launched the Red Bus Project in 2012, and since then have visited over 60 different colleges. “The very first tour of the red bus actually came through my university, it was one of the first or second stops ever made. I went and hung out, figured out what it was all about, and fell in love.” Ashley West said, an intern for the Red Bus Project. Freshman nursing major Sedona Goad thinks the project is a great way to bring awareness of orphans to students. “I think it’s a really good organization and how they are doing it through thrifting,” Goad said. “It’s really “in” right now among college students and by going campus-to-campus and getting as much money as they can and donating it solely to the orphan care, I really admire that” Goad was so impressed with the organization that she decided to work with the project while they were on campus and help students involved. “I’m in FYC and at first we were required to take shifts, but then I got here and I talked to one of the people that runs the show and I was really interested and really glad that I could help. They gave me all these statistics about how every 18 seconds a person is orphaned so I want to do anything I can to help out.” Orphaned children often lose their voices and are overlooked and undervalued. The Red Bus Project wants to give those children a voice. Students who didn’t get a chance to participate in the Red Bus Project can always help.. Students can mail their old clothes to the organization, intern...

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