Gain cultural experience with study abroad trips
Apr21

Gain cultural experience with study abroad trips

Published in the Sept. 28, 2016 issue of The Bells For many years now, UMHB students have participated in study abroad trips in places all around the world. Depending on the country students are traveling to, these trips can last anywhere from an entire semester to a May mini-term. There are currently ten study abroad trips for the year 2017, which includes countries like Italy, Thailand, Lithuania, Peru Ireland, and many more. Students will soon have another chance to explore endless possibilities in one of these faraway places. But, how does a student know if Study Abroad is right for them? According to former Study Abroad students, new world travelers should ask themselves these questions: Do you want to be introduced to a new culture and try new things? Are you willing to step out of your comfort zone? Do you want to be immersed in a language foreign to you? But former students said that despite the rich cultural experience, studying abroad is not a vacation. Students do have free time to explore the culture, but the time away from the States does count as college credit, so most of the time students are learning. Some programs require students to meet specific criteria, but often times, students have already completed the necessary requirements. If a student is enrolled in a nursing course, they can be eligible for the School of Nursing’s trip to Peru. Dr. Sharon Souter, the Dean of the College of Nursing, leads this group to achieve global perspectives and have students observe health and nursing intervention on a global scale. “My favorite part of the trip is watching the students improve as they interact with the citizens,” Souter said. “I also love to see them realize how fortunate they are to live in the US.” In the summer of 2016, senior Spanish Major Alex Stewart attended UMHB’s study abroad trip to Costa Rica for 28 days. While there she studied the history and culture of Costa Rica and other Latin American countries. ”I felt like I was learning at every moment every single day,” Stewart said. Even though Stewart was only in class from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m., Monday through Friday in a local school building, after class she and other students would go on excursions to different areas to experience the culture first hand. Not only did Stewart get to experience the culture through outings, she was also immersed in Costa Rican customs through classes taught by locals. “My favorite part was going the beach while walking through a national park’s scenic trail,” she said. “All these tiny monkeys came out and we...

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Vets transition from combat to classroom
Apr15

Vets transition from combat to classroom

UMHB students have a variety of backgrounds and experiences. Some students have even seen combat, and are looking to transition from active duty to civilian life. The university has demonstrated a commitment to helping veterans adapt to their new lives. So much so that UMHB has been classified as a yellow ribbon school which simply means soldiers are always welcome. They go through admissions, enrolling, and classes just like everyone else. One downside to the admissions process is that sometimes UMHB doesn’t allow active duty students. “[Active duty military members] often have to work on the base as a full-time job, and working from eight-to-five isn’t going to give them a well-rounded college experience,” said Patrick Munoz, head of military admissions. But because the university wants to serve all members of the military, they are working on an online program that would be beneficial to those active duty students. For those who have gone through active duty and are returning to civilian life, the process can be very stressful. The university not only wants to help ease this transition by providing an opportunity to advance their careers, but also by providing services that will help them ease into the next stage of life. If a solider is having a hard time adapting to their new life and classes they can get free counseling at UMHB’s Counseling Center. Being on campus also gives veterans the chance to get to know other students and participate in university events. “After leaving the Navy, I tried to do a semester online before coming to UMHB, but it was so isolated. UMHB gives me social interaction.” said Garrett Coppin, a junior business Management major. Coppin was an Intel specialist for the Navy and spent a lot of his time at different ports around the Americas. He has served in Cuba, California, Washington State, and Hawaii. “My responsibilities are different and I get to sleep in longer,” said Coppin said of the differences between military and college life. But even though college affords many veterans the chance to gain experiences they’ve never had, it can often be an adjustment when going from living on a base to living in an institutional setting. Brandon Middleton, a sophomore history major, explained that after coming to UMHB he had a hard time following UMHB’s rules. He struggled with these issues for a short while, but eventually realized that these rules were put in place for a reason. “My work ethic changed and got better after all the training,” said Middleton, “It is easier to learn here because of the small classroom sizes.” Middleton was a tank driver in...

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Students raise the curtain on new drama club
Feb16

Students raise the curtain on new drama club

The Crusader Company is one of the newest organizations on campus and was formed in the fall semester of 2015. The club hopes to help students prepare for work in show business. Whether students have experience or not, the club accepts them all. “We wanted to make the club because there was no drama club on campus,” said Danielle East, the club’s president. The purpose of Crusader Company is to help students gain knowledge of everything that would happen onstage or backstage, like using props, making costumes, creating a scene, and acting. The club will host workshops this semester to help students improve in a certain area and rehearse for upcoming plays. Club sponsor and supervisor Kathy Owens said the organization is a way for those interested in theatre to get their feet wet. “It will introduce them to the various tasks that theatre production require,” Owens said. “It will also allow like-minded individuals to bond over their shared love of theatre.” Owens likes the potential of the organization,” “It has the potential to be a wonderful force on campus,”she said. There will be many events this spring semester in which students can get involved. For their February fundraiser, the organization will be selling chocolate covered strawberries (two for a dollar) in the first floor of Bawcom on Friday, Feb. 12. The club will also be partnering with ROTC in March for a unique service project. Members of Crusader Company will pose as civilians, leaders, and military personnel during a training exercise put on by the ROTC. The opposing forces (played by the Crusader Company members) and the ROTC members will both be armed with paintball guns to simulate combat. The organization also plans to perform a small play for students and the community sometime during the semester. With the organization continuing to gain recognition, East said she has realized the need for such a club on campus. “I like how [Crusader Company] has gained a lot of feedback about how an organization like it needs to be on campus,” East said. The organization is currently meeting every other Monday in the Baugh Center for Visual Arts at 8...

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Holocaust exhibit visits Bell County
Jan28

Holocaust exhibit visits Bell County

The Holocaust Museum in Washington D.C. has presented the Bell County Museum with the opportunity to host the first traveling exhibit west of the Mississippi River. UMHB and the museum are partnering together to encourage students and residents of Belton to attend the exhibit. Dr. Timothy Crawford, the Dean of the College of Christian Studies brought the idea of hosting the exhibit to the museum’s curator, Beverly Headley. “We were honored to help out by bringing [the exhibit] to the UMHB community, the Bell County Museum, and the Belton area.” said Headley. “It’s a great reminder that we must study history. We need to understand not only what happened, but why it was allowed to happen. It raises fundamental issues about human nature, social responsibility and the obligation of individuals and institutions to act with a conscience in the face of unspeakable crimes.” The exhibit, Deadly Medicine: Creating the Master Race, discusses the medical and scientific studies of the Holocaust. This exhibit examines how the Nazi’s thought about genetics and used leadership and science to help justify persecution and murder. “This exhibit is a really good answer to the question why did the Holocaust happen?” Crawford said. “The terms ‘racially fit’ and ‘the cleansing of Germany’ was often used to explain to the German citizens why these atrocities were the right things to do.” The museum shows advertisements that were posted all around the country about how unethical it was for “racially fit Germans” to marry or procreate with “non-Germans.” And race wasn’t the only thing that Germany wanted to exterminate from family trees. Homosexuals, the handicapped, and the mentally ill were also considered to have “bad genetics.” A small number of artifacts are also located in the museum showing Nazi supporters personal items. “Deadly Medicine is a reminder that it has happened in the past and it is a history we should not repeat.” said. The exhibit is sectioned into two parts. On the first floor of the museum, guests can see sciences and experiments that took place before World War II began, focusing on creating the “perfect race.” Guests can also see the famous scientists that were used as inspiration for the experiments, such as Gregory Mendel and Charles Darwin, as well as the scientists that played important roles in the experiments, such as Dr. Ernst Rudin. There are many videos that play among the exhibit to show viewers what types of tools that were used, footage of results, and small biographies of different scientists. The second floor of the museum discusses what happened once World War II began. It depicts the victims of the illegal experiments,...

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College republicans start new organization
Dec08

College republicans start new organization

The College Republicans are back, and ready to educate voters on the political issues of the day. The club was originally started three years ago, but couldn’t find its momentum. Recently the organization was brought back to campus and students are excited to see its return. “When I heard they were bringing it back I thought, I want to get it done, I want to make it happen. I went to Sheryl Garza, our supervisor, and asked what I can do to help,” said senior economics major and organization president Collin Cavendish. The politically focused club hopes to help young voters on campus find their political identity so they know exactly why they vote for a cetain party or candidate, and know exactly what policies are most important to them. “For a lot of people on campus this will be the first election they will be voting in,” Cavendish said. “To think your vote doesn’t matter or won’t count for anything is scary. I want to raise awareness that the policies will effect you and it does matter. It is important to get to the polls and vote.” At the interest meeting on Nov. 19, the officers introduced the plan for the organization’s future. Many ideas are still in discussion, and the officers are allowing members to partake in the discussions by expressing their opinions as well. During the meeting, the organization’s officers brought in three guest speakers to talk to the students. Michael Ball, senior director of UMHB, was the first guest speaker to talk to the group. He talked about the upcoming election and the campaigns he had been a part of in the past. “Your ability to influence is greater now than ever,” Ball said. He explained that our votes do directly affect us even though we might not see the effect. The next guest speaker was Henry Garza, the current Bell County District Attorney. Garza talked about his previous experiences with Republican campaigns and creating your political identity is more important than ever. He explained to the viewers that politics are not bad, but they can be difficult. Michael James, who is a chairman of the Young Republicans in Bell County also spoke during the meeting. James talked about how UMHB represents a unique demographic “What I mean by that is, You are the majority,” James said. Freshman nursing major, Mackenzie Henderson, attended to gain a better understanding of how she can be a part of the political process. “I wanted to come so I can be informed further about political issues and develop friendships with other Republicans.” Freshman political science major, Tyler Baker, also...

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