All Saints inspires audiences everywhere
Sep14

All Saints inspires audiences everywhere

The movie All Saints is a PG Christian film that was released on Aug. 25. The movie wasn’t heavily advertised before its release. Despite this, Rotten Tomatoes rated this movie as 93 percent fresh, and my personal rating would be a 7.5 out of 10 stars. The film runs for an hour and 48 minutes and includes footage of the congregation that the story is based on in the credits. The film centers around Michael Spurlock, who decides to trade in his corporate sales career to become a pastor. Unfortunately, his first assignment in his sales career is to close a country church and sell the prime piece of land where it sits. He soon has a change of heart when the church starts to welcome refugees from Burma. Spurlock now finds himself working with the refugees to turn the land into a working farm to pay the church’s bills. The movie is based in Smyrna, Tennessee and the movie was filmed in the same church. This movie is based on the true story of this Episcopal Church. History versus Hollywood even did a comparison of the two stories and concluded that there were only minor tweaks. While the movie isn’t a fast-paced action adventure or a slow and steady romantic comedy, it still has plenty of potential. The movie goes at a well-paced speed and has a straight forward plot. The movie gives each character enough screen time for the audience to know their role in the church and a little about their past. We know enough about everyone to understand their lives without needing a long backstory. It was the perfect amount of information to know these characters and feel empathy for them. I thought the actors did a splendid job. John Corbett played Michael Spurlock, and I believe he did a good job showing the emotional and physical struggles the real pastor went through trying to keep this tiny church afloat. Watching Nelson Lee portray Ye Win, the main refugee who seeks the church’s help, was inspiring. These actors helped make these characters feel as if this struggle was happening to the audience as well, and I believe it made the movie more enjoyable to watch. One thing I thought was cool was how the movie brought back the refugees and put them in the movie. They played themselves. Those are not extras. Those are the people this story happened to. In the movie, Atticus Spurlock (played by Myles Moore) becomes friends with one of the children refugees named Po (played by John Wise Win). However, the real Po is somewhere in the background and the...

Read More
University welcomes new faculty this fall
Sep14

University welcomes new faculty this fall

UMHB welcomes more faculty this semester as the new Provost and 11 new Professors join the Cru Nation. Dr. John Vassar is the new provost and senior vice president for academic affairs. He previously worked as a provost at Louisiana State University for four years and was a professor there for 13 years prior. Vassar explains that the role of the provost is essentially geared at serving the faculty and making sure that the programs the university offers are of the highest quality. The provost has already started working with the faculty by holding meetings and setting up regular phone calls with the deans of each college. Vassar announced his promotion of Arts and Science Dean Daniel Mynatt to vice provost in order to ensure support for faculty and accreditation. The new professors will also be able to provide a diverse new perspective in the colleges. Dr. Kim Bodenhammer has taught here at UMHB in the past, but paused her professorship after the birth of her child. She is the only new professor for the College of Christian Studies. “Many students in my class come from a Christian background, but express that they are much more familiar with the New Testament than the Old Testament,” Bodenhammer said, “I want students to come away from my ‘Engaging the Old Testament’ class with a better understanding and appreciation for the Old Testament and what it can mean for their lives, as well as an appreciation for the art of reading texts.” Ms. Laura Williams will also be returning to UMHB since leaving her position as Mayborn operations manager back in 2009. Now, she will become an instructor for the College of Education under the Exercise and Sport Science department. “I want to teach my students to think for themselves, to find their own paths, and to embrace the power of technology to achieve their goals and dreams. I want students to walk away from my classes with the knowledge and ability to ask the right questions and find the right answers. It seems so simple, but it’s a skill that’s often overlooked,” Williams said, “[I want them to gain] that personal drive and entrepreneurship that are pretty much necessities in today’s workforce. If you want to achieve something big, no one’s going to give you a trail of breadcrumbs to follow – you’re going to have to chart your own path.” Dr. Todd Ferguson and Dr. John Snow are both new professors in the College of Humanities and Sciences. Ferguson will work with the social sciences while Snow will be working in the mathematics department. Ferguson explains that his goals are...

Read More
PAC almost finished: Faculty prepares for art performances
Aug23

PAC almost finished: Faculty prepares for art performances

In the spring semester of 2017, ground was broken to make way for a new Sue & Frank Mayborn Performing Arts Center on campus. Now, construction on the building is close to being finished and performances are being planned. The building is quickly becoming the new pride and joy of many and after $20 million, months of hard work, and seeing the building’s result, it is easy to see why. The new Sue & Frank Mayborn Performing Arts Center will be able to seat up to 546 people in the performance hall, which is 246 more than the 300 seats in the Hughes performance hall. This new feature on campus will bring students live cinema, plus it will be equipped with a spacious lobby and a box office with a walk-up window. The Sue & Frank Mayborn Performing Arts Center will also hold classes for students looking to broaden their performing skills. “We don’t have an official date for the dedication ceremony at this time, but it will be in October. At that event, which will be open to the public, there will be a ribbon cutting and tours of the facility,” James Stafford, Director of marketing and Public Relations, told Belton journal during an interview. Director of Operations & Technical Director for the Sue & Frank Mayborn Performing Arts Center, Erik Vose, believes the new addition to campus will be extremely beneficial and will open more options for the College of Visual and Performing Arts to offer the student body. Shyanne Hoffman, a freshman forensics major with a music minor, says she is excited for the new opportunities the building and the class will have in store for her. “I think it’s going to be a great addition to UMHB and I’m excited to see what amazing things it has to offer.” Hoffman said. Freshman music education major, Makaila Showels, believes the newest addition to campus will be able to give her a new sense of responsibility. “I am very excited. I never had a chance to perform or work in a brand new Performing Arts building. “This building will provide music and performance students with a professional level performance space that will help them gain better experience as performers,” Vose said. “The rest of the student body will also have a beautiful new venue to visit for their Fine Arts Experience credits. Hopefully, they will enjoy the experience enough to come back even when they don’t need credit.” The Sue & Frank Mayborn Performing Arts Center is the last project of the 2011 Campus Master Plan and will pave the way for more innovative plans to...

Read More
Midnight March tradition continues
Apr26

Midnight March tradition continues

Published in the April 26, 2017 issue of The Bells Charter Day is a campus tradition that celebrates the history and heritage of the university and commemorates the initial signing of the school’s charter on February 1, 1845. It is usually celebrated on the first Wednesday of each February. Sophomores ring the sophomore bell and seniors place a wreath at the grave of Judge R.E.B. Baylor located in Heritage Plaza. The school recently celebrated the 172nd year since being chartered in 1845. This year, the school spiced things up by having a charter weekend on Friday April 21 and Saturday April 22. Many events were held on campus to celebrate the occasion, which included a Heritage Club tea and reception, a dinner and floral presentation, multiple club reunions, and the Midnight March and robing ceremony. The school even provided campus tours for visiting alumni to see how much the school has grown. A dinner and floral presentation were held on Friday to honor the first ladies of UMHB. 1975 graduate Norman Northen presented original floral arrangements while telling heartfelt stories of the first ladies. The dinner also included a display of seven dresses, each owned by a first lady of UMHB. Jim and Caroline Cope met at UMHB and attended the weekend events. Caroline attended UMHB from 1963-1967 and Jim met her in ’63 before moving to Howard Payne. They attended the Charter Day festivities not only to celebrate the school’s founding, but also their 50th anniversary. Jim Cope studied PE with a biology minor here before he transferred, and Caroline studied Home Economics. “A lot has changed since we were students,” Jim Cope said. “There were only around ten buildings on campus when we were here.” Caroline’s class was the first to graduate from Walton Chapel after the original chapel burned down, and they were also the first people to see the construction of Getty’s Hall completed. “We really enjoyed the dinner and floral presentation, the chapel service, and the reunion events,” Caroline Cope said. Friday festivities also included the traditional Midnight March and robing ceremony that is an opportunity for students to honor their friendships with each other and exhibit their loyalty to the university. During the week prior, seniors give candles to special friends and invite them to attend the event. The robing ceremony symbolizes the passing of the student leadership from the senior class to the junior class. Seniors place their caps and gowns on the juniors, and this is the first time the juniors can sing the alumni/senior song, “Up with the Purple.” Rumored to have started in 1902, this tradition is a highlight...

Read More
ASL students host week of events to spread awareness
Mar29

ASL students host week of events to spread awareness

Published in the March 29, 2017 issue of The Bells Deaf Awareness Month is here and the campus’ Sign Language program will be hosting Deaf Awareness Week (DAW), March 28-30. The week of events promotes awareness of the deaf community, what deaf culture looks like, and what the deaf community values. It also encourages students on campus to get involved by taking American Sign Language classes and going out to personally interact with deaf people. “There is a group of people that the world forgets to recognize as a community,” said Dr. Parker Kennedy, the ASL professor here on campus. “The deaf community is one of the most unreached people groups— that right there says a lot, and should be especially important to a community like UMHB.” In the past years the sign language team has gone to deaf churches, Deaf Expo, deaf chats, and visited a deaf-owned business in Austin called Crepe Crazy. Throughout the week, the team will have a booth in Bawcom from 11 a.m.-12 p.m. for any students who have questions about the deaf community or culture. On March 28, there will be an ASL movie night showing the story of the deaf wrestler, The Hammer. The movie will show the hearing what it is like growing up deaf in a hearing world. On March 29, during the ONE service, a music interpreter will be on stage signing throughout the session. Lastly, they will be hosting a wax museum on the second floor of Bawcom about significant people in the deaf community from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. on March 30. Senior speech communications major, Briana Hennington, has participated in DAW for the past four years. She is now a teaching assistant in ASL and helped coordinate this year’s event with the other two TAs. “It’s important for everyone to know about the deaf community. They aren’t just a group of people who can’t hear,” said Hennington. “They have their own culture, language, values, and tradition just like any other people group. I think students can get a better understanding of that from Deaf Awareness Week.” In the past four years, Hennington found a passion in the deaf community. “I always look forward to DAW because I get to spend time talking about what I love, and I also get to advocate for them, which is just as important,” she said. Organizers of Deaf Awareness Week hope to spread an understanding and acceptance of the deaf community, and encourage students to learn new things about deaf...

Read More
Page 1 of 712345...Last »