Thanksgiving with the Cru: Student orgs get festive
Nov13

Thanksgiving with the Cru: Student orgs get festive

Student organizations all around campus are preparing to celebrate the holidays in their own unique ways. Here are four student organizations who are getting into a festive spirit before the Thanksgiving break. Apostolic Cru is a fairly new organization and will be celebrating their one year anniversary as a campus ministry later this month. To celebrate Thanksgiving, Apostolic Cru is hosting a Friendsgiving in Meyer 216 on Thursday Nov. 15 at 7 p.m. There will be food, games, and worship. “Thanksgiving is a holiday about coming together as a community,” Apostolic Cru’s President, Senior accounting major Lauren Lum, said. “The first thanksgiving was about how the pilgrims and the Native Americans came together and celebrated through fellowship. We want to recreate that fellowship.” For more information on the event follow Apostolic Cru on Instagram at Apostolic.Cru. The Association of Black Students (ABS) hosts several events throughout the year. Last year, their event was a multicultural fashion show. This year, ABS is hosting a Fall Festival and Talent Show on Nov. 13 at 6 p.m. in the McLane Great Hall on the third floor of the Bawcom Student Union. There will be a speaker, and students perform their talents in front of their peers. There will also be a collection box for helping hands so attendees can bring donations and give to the community through this event. The English Club also hosts two events annually. “Operation Christmas Child” allows students to donate different items like toys, hygiene products, school supplies, etc. to underprivileged children in the bell county area. Students can find boxes for donating in Heard, Sanderford, the nursing building, the library, as well as the the York and Wells building, until Nov. 12. The English Club’s other annual event, “Literary Hand Turkey Contest” involves designing a mock book cover that features a hand turkey every November. Past winners include Hedda Gobbler, Don Turkeyote, The Gizzard of Oz. and As I Lay Frying. Competitors vie for various prizes including the coveted “Baste in Class.” The ASTRA Club (a community service club: Ability Service Training Responsibility Achievement) held its fall-themed appreciation dinner on Friday Nov. 2 for members and staff of the famous “meth house,” which serves lunch to college students every Wednesday. The Methodist church’s congregation was served chicken fried steak, a variety of vegetables, mashed potatoes, and deserts made by the students. After a sermon and a meal, congregation members were given ornaments engraved with a special note from the club. “The president of the club and several others have gone to the meth house for lunch all through their time in college,” Astra advisor Traci Squarcette said....

Read More
The vital issue with Venom
Oct10

The vital issue with Venom

The main protagonist said in the trailer for this movie “we all have our own problem.” He is right. I definitely have one. This movie. Sony pictures and Marvel Studios collaborated to make the movie Venom, which was released on Oct. 5 to low reviews from critics. Even though Marvel and Sony teamed up to make this movie, Venom is not connected to the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU) in any way. Warning: there is a very minor spoiler below. While this PG-13 superhero spinoff wasn’t bad, it wasn’t all that good either. Don’t get me wrong – there were a few good things about the movie – but overall, I felt it was a lackluster film that could have been better. The movie was really slow at the beginning and then, once Venom was introduced, it was like whiplash as everything was sped up and squished together. The protagonist is of the movie is yet another journalist, Eddie Brock (played by Tom Hardy), who digs too deep of a hole to get out of at the beginning of the movie, trying to get evidence of misconduct in what is called “Life Foundation.” While investigating, he becomes the host for the alien symbiote that is Venom. With Venom’s help, Brock now has the power to stop whatever shady business that the Life Foundation is doing. While the movie was easy to follow at the beginning and did a good enough job explaining the alien issue so that I wasn’t totally lost, there were still moments that left me confused. For example, it is apparent that these alien symbiotes can transfer between hosts and that they are living things. This is also made clear in the trailer when Eddie refers to himself as ‘we’ before engaging in a fight with the bad guys. (Minor Spoiler Alert) The movie explains that the symbiote is bonding with the host to live and the host will slowly die no matter what. The writers didn’t do a good job explaining why some hosts die immediately after the alien is transferred and others lived. My friend and I discussed this issue at the end and we came up with a semi-reasonable explanation, but it is just speculation at this point. One thing I liked was how Venom was a separate entity and would converse with Eddie. It wasn’t a situation like in Spider-Man, where Peter was bitten and suddenly had powers for himself. The dialog was interesting, comical at times, and very believable. Tom Hardy’s acting was great when it came down to it. His emotions were very up front and I liked that, but I...

Read More
First Generation dinner: Making transitions and learning traditions
Sep12

First Generation dinner: Making transitions and learning traditions

To welcome the 370 first-generation freshmen who became Crusaders this year, The University of Mary Hardin-Baylor’s President Randy O’Rear hosted the third annual First to Go Welcome Dinner on his front lawn on campus Thursday, Aug. 30. The recently established annual dinner is held for first-generation freshmen to help them get in touch with other students, faculty and even President O’Rear himself. Students had the chance to eat Cru dogs for the first time, take pictures in a photo booth and participate in a raffle for UMHB themed prizes. UMHB defines the term ‘first-generation’ as a student where neither parents received a bachelor’s degree or higher. Katie Gregory is the head of the First to Go (F2G) program and a Student Success Specialist in the Center for Academic Excellence (CAE). She personally contacts each student before the school year starts and answers their questions. “There have always been first-generation students attending UMHB, but [this is the third year the program has been active].“As each year passes, we enhance the program to be more impactful and beneficial for students,” Gregory said. Statistics show that three out of five first-generation college students do not complete a degree in six years, and 60 percent of the first-generation students who drop out of college do so during their first year. These are two statistics UMHB is trying to change. By providing recourses and answering questions, the F2G program is helping first-generation students realize that they are not alone and have many people who want them to succeed in life beyond UMHB. “Originally, I felt we had such a large number of first-generation students and I felt that the university could do more for that group of students and encourage them. The national statistics communicate that it is hard to be successful as a first-generation student,” President Randy O’Rear said. He started hosting the dinner to show first-generation students that UMHB cares about their well-being and achievements. He wanted to show the incoming freshmen that they are not alone in this and help is all around them. “They came to Mary Hardin-Baylor because they want to obtain a college degree and we are here to help them reach that goal,” O’Rear said. Many students have some sort of idea about what college will be like or they can ask their parent about their college years. But first-generation students don’t really know what to expect because they are the first in their family to experience college. Freshman social work major Mary Herschberger says that a big challenge for her is breaking the cycle of not attending a college. And she feels the pressure to succeed...

Read More

Summer break brings changes to campus

Over the summer, UMHB made some notable changes to different areas of campus, the most recognizable being the renovation of the Living Flame and the gas lines that power it. When the flame was renovated, the campus decided to relocate three plaques surrounding the flame to different areas of the school. Junior Christian studies major Ashley Boutte said that she noticed the renovations to the flame when she returned to campus. “As a junior, I had the honor of being a part of the first class to go to the newly renovated flame during welcome week. I think it looks more professional this way.” Other changes that occurred over the summer include moving the senior bell from the quad to the Musick Alumni Center and Museum, as well as the renovation of Presser Hall’s first and second floors. Tyler Baker, a senior political science and speech communication double major and UMHB Student Body President, said he was pleased with the changes. “I think it was a good idea. I was pleased that it is now all concrete around the flame and I think it represents UMHB well,” Baker said. “Moving the senior bell to the alumni museum makes more sense because that is where we will all end up. It is a way to connect seniors with the alumni community.” Dr. Steve Theodore is the Senior Vice President for Administration and Chief Operating Officer of UMHB, and he oversaw all of these projects. “We did everything with the students’ interests in mind,” he said. Dr. Theodore says that there are a few more projects in the works. One that is already in action is the expansion and rebuilding of the parking lot in front of Davidson Hall. The new parking lot should be finished by mid-September. The school also plans to complete an addition to Hardy Hall by next fall. Then, the Mabee Market on the first floor of the Mabee Student Success Center will be moved into Hardy Hall along with a new Moe’s Grill. The previous location of the Mabee Market will then be converted into an Einstein Bros. bagels, providing another dining...

Read More
Ballroom club: A chance to dance
Apr11

Ballroom club: A chance to dance

Cru Ballroom is a new student organization focusing on getting people together to learn ballroom dancing. Club President Storm Garcia defines ballroom dancing as “partner dancing across many different cultures, countries, and types of music.” The club can teach students 32 different types of dances and features country, line, and swing dancing. Since the club is new, it currently averages 10 people who meet to dance. This club allows students to receive hands-on-help and offers new skills for all dancers, beginners and professionals alike. Garcia encourages students to attend meetings. “It’s a great way to meet people and a good way to get your mind off of school and have a good time. [Dancing] is also a very useful skill to have,” Garcia said. During each meeting, members spend time at the beginning talking and getting to know each other while waiting for more people to arrive. With the first dance of the meeting, Garcia will demonstrate the basic steps and then he’ll spend time dancing with each female dancer. Meanwhile, Vice President and senior psychology major Brook Shuck explained that members spend their time going through different dances. “Lately it’s been Swing, various forms of country dancing, and Waltz,” Shuck said. “ We usually break up categories of dance with a fun line dance. This usually gets people to relax a little,” Shuck said. “Our meetings are extremely laid back and it’s kind of like a come and go type thing.” Lauren Floyd, a freshman Christian studies major, is a member of the club. “I like ballroom dancing because it’s an expression of elegance and art that takes energy. It’s really fun when you get into it and the organization is a fun way to make friends,” Floyd said. A few more dance styles included for practice are Latin dancing, swing dancing, spot dancing, and progressive dancing. Students don’t have to worry about being good at a certain style. The club’s atmosphere is an accepting one that allows students to become more confident in their dancing abilities. “Ballroom dancing is a skill that is applicable to life, a fun way to make friends, and it’s a great workout,” Schuck said. “We’d love to see more people join Cru Ballroom, especially some guys.” The organization meets in the Mayborn aerobic room every Friday from 6 p.m. until 9 p.m. For more information on how to join, students can contact Storm Garcia at...

Read More