TIPA awards Bluebonnet, Bells for hard work
Apr24

TIPA awards Bluebonnet, Bells for hard work

The Bells newspaper and Bluebonnet yearbook received a total of 65 awards for excellence in writing, design and photography from the Texas Intercollegiate Press Association at the organization’s yearly conference March 29-31. Some competitions are onsite while others are submitted from the previous fall and spring semesters. Along with the many awards the university received, each publication brought home the Sweepstakes award in its category. This honor goes to the publication with the most awards in its division. Just one week earlier in Fort Worth, the Society of Professional Journalists awarded The Bells second place for General News Reporting and second place for Best All-Around Nondaily Collegiate Newspaper for Region 8, which includes all of Texas and Oklahoma. Senior church history and journalism major Brittany Montgomery said, “For me, TIPA was important because it verified everything we as a staff have been working on for the past year.” Montgomery is the editor-in-chief of The Bells and said that it was rewarding being a part of this year’s team of journalists. “It wasn’t just me thinking something looked great but a professional agreeing that the tremendous effort we put into our stories and photos really was worth it,” she said. For sophomore nursing major Marianna Jauregui, the yearbook is something she enjoys that is outside of  her major. She said, “Well it’s hard to be the only nursing major on the yearbook staff because literally none of my classes have to do with what we do in yearbook.” She said she enjoyed TIPA and all she learned while at the conference. “I just gained a deeper knowledge of how to make my pages better and therefore deliver a great yearbook full of memories to the student body.” Over the course of the weekend, students attended sessions where they had the chance to learn from professionals in journalistic fields. The workshops ranged from sports feature writing to finding internships. TIPA hosted writers from the Corpus Christi Caller Times. Some were photojournalists and others do video reporting for the newspaper on activities being held in Corpus Christi. Sarah Acosta is the entertainment reporter for the Caller Times showcasing the top five events for the week. Mass communication/public relations major and editor-in-chief of the yearbook Anna Gamboa said, “My favorite sessions were the broadcasting sessions. It was interesting to see the broadcasting aspect of journalism.” The Bells and Bluebonnet staffs have been working hard all year for this event. Junior public relations major Brooke Morgan said, “It’s an honor to be a part of The Bells staff and be able to work with talented people and see your hard work pay off.” Morgan...

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Cru Cheer wins awards at competition
Mar27

Cru Cheer wins awards at competition

This past weekend the university’s CRU Cheer competitive cheerleading team competed in the second annual Texas Collegiate Cheerleading Championship, from which the Cru brought home six placing trophies. UMHB came home with a first, second, third and fourth place trophy for group stunt and a first and fourth place title for coed, better known as partner stunting. UMHB was one of nine schools to attend the event, Including Division I school Sam Houston State University and partner stunt first place champions from St. Edward’s University, where the competition was hosted. St. Edward’s took home third this year in partner stunt. The team faced some adversities. Junior marketing major Jenna Jones said, “Kelli Hearn, a former Cru cheerleader and current coach at Central Texas Christian School, helped us reach our full potential by encouraging us and identifying our strengths .… She used her knowledge and love for cheerleading to help us become the best we could be.” Hearn is an alumna of the university and played a major role in getting the team ready to compete. She has led her team, CTCS to back to back national championships for the team in Fellowship of Christian Cheerleaders. Campus Recreation Director Sue Weaver also helped with logistics in getting the cheerleading team ready to compete. She managed the team while Hearn had a hands-on role in critiquing and coaching. Sophomore elementary education major and second year veteran Amanda Davis said, “If it was not for them, we wouldn’t have wanted to try so hard and win for the rest of our teammates and family to overcome situations that were difficult.” Leading up to the competition, the team faced struggles including injuries and other transitions that concluded with the university competing in just group and partner stunt divisions of the competition. This was different from last year as the Cru found themselves taking home first place in skills, Division III overall and overall Texas Collegiate Championship winners from 2011. These transitions, however, did not stop the team from working hard toward their goals. Jones said, “We were faced with adversity when our group routine was no longer going to be an option .… We put together several group stunts and partner stunts in a very short amount of time and encouraged each other leading up to the competition.” The team did not stop working hard because they were no longer competing in the large group routine, but worked even harder to get the group stunts put together with just two weeks of practice. Davis said, “We all supported each other through the ups and downs, and I couldn’t thank God for a greater...

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Arterburn’s struggle with abortion

The university welcomed noted author Stephen Arterburn as the chapel speaker Feb. 29. Arterburn graduated from Baylor University and is an author, public speaker, counselor, host of a radio talk show and founder of New Life Ministries and Women of Faith. He has co-written many published works including Every Man’s Battle, The Exceptional Life, Every Young Woman’s Battle, and More Jesus, Less     Religion. Arterburn spoke on the topic of abortion and his own connection to the issue. University Chaplain Dr. George Loutherback said, “He speaks truth from personal experience.” Arterburn told the story of an abortion he was a part of in college and describes the feeling of the guilt he experienced. He said, “I had about 100 ulcers eating away at my stomach and small intestine. It was just a physiological symptom of my guilt.” He posed the question of why women who lose their child inadvertently are treated differently from women who give up their child intentionally through abortion. He also talked about the toll that the abortion had not only on him but also on the young woman. Along with the heavy story and lesson on abortion and what he considers murder, Arterburn told the redemption story of the gospel. He said that God is full of grace and willing to forgive those who may have been a part of the abortion process. “If you have been involved in an abortion, know that God loves you,”  he said. Freshman Christian ministries major Alec Lloyd had an eye  opening experience while listening to Arterburn speak. He said, “What I got from chapel is that no matter what you’ve done,  God will forgive you.” Arterburn went on to tell the story that after much time of healing and forgiveness, he married his wife. After many years of trying to start a family, they found out they were unable to have children of their own. He mentioned the irony and sadness when he realized that when he had the opportunity to start a family,  he stopped it, and then when they were ready to start a family, the couple were unable to have children of their own. After eight years of marriage, the  couple was still unable to conceive, but he talked to a co-worker at the time who had a niece looking for a godly couple to adopt the child she was expecting. On Christmas Day 1990, Arterburn and his wife welcomed their newborn baby daughter home. After not being able to have a child of their own, Arterburn believed adopting Madeline was not only a blessing, but also a second chance. He used a story from his...

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Dual athlete aids basketball team in upcoming playoffs

Cru basketball and football have one thing in common — Damian Davis. He played football through his senior season for the university. After finishing his last season on the gridiron, Davis decided to turn to his second love, the game of basketball. An athlete playing two sports at the college level is a rare sight, although Davis played both sports in high school. It takes one talented and devoted athlete to be able to cross between the two challenging, physical and rewarding sports that Davis decided to pursue. He is known for amazing catches and multiple touchdowns on the football field playing wide receiver, but Davis is also making a name for himself on the basketball court. The junior interdisciplinary studies major is proving his athletic versatility. As to what kind of athlete it takes to transition from playing football to basketball at the college level, head basketball Coach Ken DeWeese said, “If a guy is a top-notch quality athlete, well conditioned and mentally tough, the transformation is usually quick.” Davis said he started playing basketball and football when he was just 7 years old and has been playing the two ever since. Although he didn’t play basketball at the college level until the 2011-2012 season, Davis’ passion for the game was still there. He played intramural basketball to help keep his basketball skills from high school. Davis was one of the starting receivers for the football team his senior season. He played his football career for the Cru as a wide receiver, leading the team with the most receiving yards of the season with 928 yards and nine touchdowns during the 2011 season. Davis is no stranger to making the big play and finding ways to win games. He said, “My favorite part about football is scoring touchdowns.” More than just his amazing ability to play sports, Davis is known for his positive attitude in practice and in the game. Head football Coach Pete Fredenburg said, “Damian’s huge strength was he is always very positive with his attitude towards work, and it was fun coaching a person with such positive qualities.” Some might say that Davis’ ability to stay positive helped him keep focused, relaxed and make plays when they were in need. DeWeese said, “Damian likes basketball, looks forward to practice and games and is energized when he gets there.  As a coach, it is hard for me to think of a better situation than having guys that really look forward to practice every day.”...

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