Crusaders give back to their community
Sep29

Crusaders give back to their community

While most college students were sleeping on the morning of Sept. 26, many Crusaders were awake and to serve at a campus wide event. “Reaching Out is an opportunity for UMHB students to give back to the community,” Junior Christian studies major and director Zachary Raygoza said. “It went really well. We had a big turnout.” Students met on campus at 8 a.m. They then separated into groups and ventured to various locations around the city . Sophomore business major Tobin Davies served at Treehouse Farms. “We painted the inside of the rehabilitation center,” he said. “There were 15 of us that did it. It took us most of the time, but we still had time to clean up the paint supplies when we were finished.” Junior nursing major Jacquie Case spent her morning at Helping Hands. “My group had to help strip the floors for repairs,” she said. “We also boxed up frozen broccoli and carrots  for them to give to their clients and helped to pick up trash.” Approximately 200 volunteers donated their time to serve, including dorm directors and professors. Junior exercise and sport science major Roger Sanchez enjoyed his time serving. “It was a humbling experience,” he said. “I really enjoyed being able being able to give back to the city. Belton has done University of Mary Hardin-Baylor and I’m glad we were able to do the same.” “One of my favorite sites was Churches Touching Lives for Christ,” Raygoza said. “It was more raw for them.” Senior business management major Veronica Sullivan participated at the location. “We helped to fold clothes, and we bagged groceries,” she said. “We also filled up bottles with laundry detergent. There was a constant flow of people who needed the items. We had a great team with great team work.” “One lady I saw, had five kids and one of them was only a month old. She was getting clothes for them. I was like ‘wow’, you could tell the people community.” Volunteers also had a choice to help with Won’t You be My Neighbor. “The event is an opportunity for the local community to do local outreach,” said campus missionary Jena Coulson. “We had 120 volunteers show up for Won’t You be My Neighbor, including the softball team, Miss MHB pageant girls, Ministry Leadership Council, Freshmen Ministry and Reaching Out.” Raygoza said, “It was like a fall festival for the local kids; just to let the community know that someone cares about them.” “There were snow cones, hotdogs and popcorn,” said Coulson. “We also had face painting, a clown and a magician for the kids. There were also...

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Stuck at a fork in the road

I can say from personal experience, senior year of college is not easy. Especially in this economy, many college seniors are at a fork in the road, trying to decide on a career or to perhaps continue education into grad school. Let me rephrase that first option, seniors are waiting for a career of their choice to sweetly and appreciatively take them into its arms. Annoyingly, that is just not the case and if people you know get their dream job right out of college, they are the exception. A senior then might decide to pursue higher education only because that fantasy job hasn’t taken flight. President John F. Kennedy once said, “Let us think of education as the means of developing our greatest abilities, because in each of us there is a private hope and dream which, fulfilled, can be translated into benefit for everyone and greater strength for our nation.” Respectfully, what if a person’s dream isn’t education and in my opinion right now, grad school, it’s a hard decision. A few days ago, I was sitting in the office of a good friend. She and I had also been classmates last semester. She has since graduated and moved on to what I call, “A big girl job.” On her wall, I noticed a colorful poster with the lyrics of “Wasted” by Carrie Underwood written on it. The song “Wasted” is about a girl who doesn’t want to look back at her life one day and think she let all those years go by wasted. It got me thinking, I wasn’t put on this earth to go to school or to work. Our society has made that a norm. I was put on this earth for my life. If I could stop and just enjoy today and not worry about tomorrow, then I will be letting the future figure out itself. So, for right now, I still have not decided on a career or grad school, but I’m sure God already has that one picked out for me. The answer is written in black and white, in a book that I read every day: “Therefore do not worry about tomorrow, for tomorrow will worry about itself. Each day has enough trouble of its own” Matthew 6:34. I am going to enjoy the rest of my senior year and continue to ponder what to do after graduation, just not as severely. I don’t have to know right now what I’m going to be doing in a year, and there is no book written on how to play the game of life. I personally agree with Marilyn Monroe, “If...

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UMHB rises in national rankings

UMHB earned a top tier ranking among Universities-Master’s West category in the 2010 edition of America’s Best Colleges by U.S. News & World Report, one of the nation’s leading sources of service journalism and news. Director of Institutional Effectiveness and Institutional Research Amy Bawcom said the university’s final rank was 32—13 points up from last year’s 45 spot. “We were very excited about our improvement this year,” Bawcom said. Director of Admissions and Recruiting Brent Burks said 598 freshmen enrolled for the fall 2009 class, a historical high. “We’ve partnered with a new student listing, Royal and Co.,” Burks said. “They work with us to find students who meet our academic profile. We then begin to move these students into the application stage.” Ranks are measured by many standards. “Peer assessment is one-fourth of our score,” Bawcom said. “The U.S. News and World Report send a survey out and they vote on our academic reputation. The graduation rate then couples with freshmen retention rate. We look at a group of freshmen who come in and graduate together. We don’t count … transfers.” The school also has created a new motto and dedicated more time to recruitment. “We have a new slogan, ‘Education for Life, Experience of a Lifetime,’” Bawcom said. “We updated this on our billboards and Web site.” It has been a group effort. “Our admission was proactive by containing tuition increases and increasing the funding in financial aid by one million dollars,” Burks said. “All the efforts helped UMHB put our best foot forward to ensure that students know UMHB would do all that we can to help them with aid.” Current students are honored by the school’s ranking, and are looking forward to the advances the various departments are making. “I know future employers and grad schools will recognize the quality education I received at UMHB,” senior nursing major Jessica Gallagher said. “I am proud this university continues to develop marketable students.” Senior sport and exercise science major Michael Ivey agrees. He said, “It pleases me to see that not only do we respect ourselves, but other schools around us also respect us academically and...

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Temple looks for young professionals

Temple Young Professionals, a new and rising committee in central Texas, is attracting students and local businesses for many reasons. Spherion Branch Manager and president of the organization Sol Melton said the idea for the group is to attract and retain the younger generation in the talent pool. “We target an age group 21-45,” he said, “The younger generation has a live first and work second attitude. That is a huge retention factor. Temple can have every job in the world but if it’s not a cool place to live, it won’t matter. The younger generation will move to a more culturally diverse and active city and then look for a job as opposed to getting a good job in Temple and then relocating here for it.” Joan Mikeska Realtor and Temple Young Professionals membership director Ali Thompson recommends that UMHB students get involved. “It’s a great opportunity for college students to meet people in the business world right now who can mentor them,” she said. “It will help them to locate a job when they graduate college.” Melton said people can use it as a networking opportunity for college graduates or rising seniors. “We offer after-hour events to ensure that we will fit the schedules of college students.” Temple Young Professionals meets once a month and has a guest speaker who discusses a local, national or international issue. “We rotate between a business lunch and a social afterhours,” he said, “We keep our members engaged in what’s going on in the city. Also, we discuss what they want done, and we discuss how to get it done.” The committee is essential for job networking and social group activities. “I lived in Temple for fi ve years before I found out there was an adult soccer league,” Melton said. “I probably would have known years ago about the opportunity if Temple Young Professionals had existed.” Extraco Banks insurance specialist Allison Lueck said Temple has needed this type of organization for quite some time. “Over the years, I have witnessed my parents’ generation do so much to help this community grow,” she said. “It’s time for our generation to step up as well. I hope Temple Young Professionals continues to grow and has a positive effect on our community.” The group is dedicated to increasing the city’s potential toward social and economical growth. “A service project is also in the future with the region,” he said, “All kinds of ideas are progressing, and we’re looking and listening for more.” Melton said young professionals need to be familiar with companies in the area. “If the person reviewing your resumé in human...

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University president dubs renowned artist a Crusader
Sep16

University president dubs renowned artist a Crusader

Christian music sensation Phil Wickham rocked the steps of Luther Memorial with a concert and a worship service Aug. 22 and 23. As the sun sank beneath the horizon, the night sky illuminated a stage for worship. “My music is an ultimate goal to create a response, and to respond with and encounter God and to go deeper with him ––to create a moment with God,” Wickham said. The musician encourages the younger generation to be convicted by their beliefs. “It is a massive struggle with my generation and a problem that goes way beyond the generation,” Wickham said. “There’s a professing of Christianity and what it means to pursue God every day. There is a lack of passion to live, not just raising your hands in church and witnessing once a month. A phrase to describe it well is ‘reckless abandon.’ Our job as young believers is to live a life that is unafraid, abandoning all cares into the wind and saying ‘I’m going to live for Jesus.’” During his time spent at the university, Wickham was dubbed a Crusader by university President Randy O’Rear. Junior nursing major Sarah Herriott was excited about the event. “I thought it was cool that he was made an official Crusader for life,” she said. Sophomore sports management major Andy Evans agreed. “The concert was well done; and everybody got a kick out of him being dubbed as a Crusader,” he said. Wickham encouraged students to be conscious of their actions. “It’s easy to be a Christian because the lines are more blurred in the world,” he said. “Romans 12:1 … should be the motto or statement for living. There are so many songs and poems, but can you say day to day, ‘I’m going to put you (God) over myself.’ It’s impossible because we’re human, but a passion is created that will change us.” Aside from touring, Wickhan recently married his longtime girlfriend. “I’ve been married 10 months now, and it has affected my career very well,” he said. “Our relationship has had an amazing improvement. We were dating when I first signed as an artist. She tours with me and is also involved with Compassion International.” Wickham said his marriage has taught him more about God. “It’s so amazing to have a partner to make me be honest with myself,”he said. “It’s complete love and a reminder of God’s love.” Wickham and his spouse are both strong supporters for Compassion International. “The foundation is an opportunity for more fortunate people to sponsor an individual child for $38 a month,” he said. “It will provide clothing, education, clean water (and) food...

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