Cru pitch pink
Feb25

Cru pitch pink

The baseball team followed in the tracks of the women’s basketball team and supported breast cancer awareness month through Pink Zone on February 10. The team wore pink uniform tops, pink shoelaces and pink wristbands. The lady Cru basketball team started the idea, and the baseball team decided to expand it. Pink T-shirts were sold in the SUB and Hardy for $10 and tribute cards for $1; all proceeds benefited Kay Yow WBCA Cancer Fund. The Cru lost to Trinity 7-0, causing UMHB to fall to 3-2 on the season. Despite the loss, head Coach Wells said the game was a success. “We absolutely plan to have another pink game,” he said. “We raised $750 our first time around, and seeing the support of the campus and this community was amazing. We sold 150 shirts for two hours on Monday and 45 minutes on Tuesday, and they sold out. I still have phone calls coming in about T-shirts, and I think we could have easily sold twice as many as we did if we had prepared for that many.” Wells said sophomore sport management major Seth Lynn approached him in the fall and asked to do a breast cancer awareness event similar to the women’s basketball team. “I told him let’s wait until the spring and piggyback with theirs. Let’s see if we can do something to give more recognition not to just our event but to their event as well. Students can go to our game and then continue with the support and go to their Thursday game and make this thing a little bit bigger than just one day.” Lynn played first base during the game and said it is important for people to be aware about breast cancer. “My family has been impacted by breast cancer,” he said while wearing a pink band around his wrist. “It’s important for people to realize how many people it affects. The game was also a good way to get involved with the community.” Senior exercise and sport science major Andrew White said he wanted to help out however he could. “In every way, besides the loss, the game was a great success,” he said. “Any time you can raise money with a team/ campus effort to contribute to those in need is a great success in itself.” For many senior players, their last opening home game was played in these jerseys that symbolize help. “It was kind of funny,” Lynn said. “I think everyone else was really involved and didn’t mind it; they knew it was for a good cause, and the coaches were all for it. I don’t...

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Economy slump inspires higher education pursuit

According to a survey by the National Association of Colleges and Employers, companies have indicated they plan to hire 22 percent fewer graduates this spring. With today’s economy in a slump and graduation approaching fast, many undergraduate seniors are deciding to continue their education at UMHB and pursue a master’s degree in their field of choice. The university currently offers 14 master’s programs and the doctorate of education degree. Clinical and mental health psychology graduate student Sarah Potter is staying positive in negative entry-level career times. “I think grad school is a great idea for any student who is graduating right now, especially because of the low job market,” she said. “It seems like a really intimidating and scary transition, but once you’re actually in your program, it all comes together and you feel so good about it.” Potter graduated earlier than expected and was not ready to leave the area. “I grew up in Houston, and I just feel that if I decided to go anywhere else for school, it would be overwhelming,” she said. “I just love this school and everything about it. It was definitely a personal decision to pursue my master’s at UMHB.” Potter researched several psychology programs. “I went to the graduate school fair here at UMHB, and I spoke to one of the recruiters for the department, and they told me the LPC program had a 100 percent licensure exam passing rate. That pretty much sold me,” she said. Exercise and sport science graduate student J.T. Fletcher said he decided to pursue further education at the university because he likes the student-to-teacher ratio. “I enjoy the small classes as well. It’s easier to communicate with your teachers and fellow classmates and build that friendship,” Fletcher said. “I enjoy the Christian atmosphere of UMHB and how the professors relate coursework back to Christ.” Fletcher said he also has a job with financial aid and that the department accommodates his schedule to provide personal time for grad school. “They really help me out,” he said. “I think it’s good for me to get it here because I will finish it faster than somewhere else. I can complete grad school in a year and a half or two years. If I went somewhere else, I would have to find a full-time job and take classes. It would be really hard to do in that amount of time.” Exercise and sport science graduate student Jared Freels thinks no other university could give the quality of education he is receiving at the university. “The reason I decided to get my master’s here is because I love the atmosphere,”...

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Sex trafficking, the epidemic
Feb10

Sex trafficking, the epidemic

There are currently 800,000 incidents of human sex trafficking in the world. Out of that number, more than 100,000 who are trafficked into the U.S. range from age 9 to 19 years old with the average age of 11. Eighty percent of those are women and children. Human sex trafficking is the contracting, conveying, or acquiring of a person by enforcement, blackmail or threat for the use of commercial sex acts. UMHB alumni Rhonda and Kathlee Roscoe are sisters and are the founders of Hope for the Sex Trafficked. In association with Hope for the Hungry, they are creating a film project centered on the problem of sexual bondage through human persecution and sex slavery in the U.S. “It is the fastest growing crime in the world,” Kathlee said. “It is also the number two organized crime in the world, behind drugs.” Rhonda said wealthier countries are the demand, and poorer countries are the supply. “All sides are affected,” she said. “People who organize the trafficking lie to the people about jobs and then put them into sex slavery.” Hope for the Sex Trafficked has currently completed 70 hours of film research from Japan, Australia, Thailand and California. The sites have traveled into red-light districts, slums and other areas where sex tourism is excessive. They are working with experts and leaders who are fighting against sex trafficking and who can give hope to the enslaved. “The people who are experiencing this are being physically, emotionally, mentally and spiritually abused,” Rhonda said. “People are paying people to destroy others.” The Roscoe sisters are currently traveling throughout the U.S. to bring awareness of the issue to the nation. They spoke about it to students, telling them what they can do to help on Jan. 20 during chapel. University Chaplain Dr. George Loutherback invited the sisters to speak because he thinks they have a done a great job at bringing awareness to the topic through their documentary. “I wanted our student body to be aware of the problem,” Loutherback said. “It’s one of those situations that isn’t talked about as much. We don’t know much about it, but it is an issue. It’s even as close as Austin.” Kathlee said strip clubs, pornography and prostitution drive the business. “They suggest it is OK to consume another person for pleasure’s sake,” she said. “They are the gateway to human trafficking.” The sisters encouraged women in the audience not to tempt men, but dress humbly and graciously. They challenged men to control their minds about sex in our hyper-sexualized culture. “Honor yourself and God by filling your calling as a woman in Proverbs 31...

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Newlyweds face challenges with love
Feb10

Newlyweds face challenges with love

Every student on campus faces the daily stresses of class, homework, presentations and study time. Junior nursing major Joe Curtis and junior education major Alysa Curtis have thrown marriage and a little girl named Josie into the mix. On Oct. 17 they said their vows and decided to take on the extra challenges. “We met through a mutual friend and instantly clicked on March 13, 2008,” Alysa said. “I fell in love with Joe the fi rst night I met him. I also fell in love with his three and a half year old daughter Josie, who I met five days later.” Joe said he knew early in the relationship that he wanted to marry her. “We had this desire to get our life started together, so I made the decision to ask her. I took her to San Antonio and proposed at a restaurant in a private booth overlooking the river. I was so nervous. I asked before we even got appetizers, just so we could enjoy the rest of the date.” Alysa said they are San Antonio Spurs fans and Joe took her to a game after the dinner. “That is what sealed the deal for me,” she said. Aside from joining Joe in his life, Alysa also gained a step daughter. The couple has Josie Friday through Tuesday. The other days of the week,she stays with her biological mother. “I turned into an instant mommy when I started dating Joe,” she said. “She’s our child and we always work our schedules to have family time together.” Alysa said it was a natural role and when Josie is with her, she is her parent. “I’ve adjusted my life to accommodate her,” she said. “I love them both, they are a joint package. I also have joint custody of her with Joe; she’s an amazing kid-o.” Josie said, “I’m happy because I love my Daddy and Lisi. She does everything with me, she plays Barbies with me and takes me to the swimming pool in the summer time.” Joe said their situation is different from just being a newlywed couple in college, Josie is another variable. “She gives us motivation and Alysa is great with her,” he said. “I know it’s hard for Alysa but she’s always been very mature about it and that’s what I was looking for in a partner.” The couple said their main focus is to become financially stable for their family. They currently hold wait staff positions at Cheeves Brothers Steak House. “I want to be able to provide for Josie and to be able to give her things in life,” Joe said....

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Voices heard about leadership

Two professors at the university were issue editors and contributing authors of Volume 11, Issue 5 of Advances in Developing Human Resources. Assistant professor for management, entrepreneurship and marketing Dr. Marilyn Byrd and professor of social work, sociology and criminal justice Shirley Walker are strong advocates about the challenges of African American women in leadership roles. The issue is titled “Giving Voice: The Sociocultural Realities of African American Women’s Leadership Experiences,” published in October. “It was an honor to be asked to do the journal because Advances is thematic and they have never done an article on African American women,” Byrd said. “It’s a highly competitive process and privilege to be asked to do the journal.” The associate editor for Advances Susan Lynham asked Byrd to edit. Lynham has since become the editor. Byrd said she was asked to write because Lynham knew it was an issue that she was interested in. “As an editor I had to select contributing authors,” Byrd said. “I looked for professors who had written on the topic of leadership experience of African American women. I then gave them a special invitation.” Walker’s article is titled “Reflections on Leadership from the Perspective of an African American Woman of Faith.” Walker said, “I hope it changes peoples perspectives in the workplace and female workers of color will be better understood and better supported in their various leadership roles. There will be a much better understanding of a race issue and a gender issue.” From invitation to publishing, the journal process took 10 months. “The topic is so under explored,” Byrd said. “We think about leadership as men and more specifically white men. There’s not a lot talked about the issues a black woman has to experience on race, class and gender.” Walker said not a lot has been written on the subject, especially from a woman of faith. “It’s great to hear the voice of African American women in the workforce”, she said. “I want people to know the importance of God and faith playing in what you do.” All the authors who contributed to the journal were African American women. “I consider it an opportunity to begin the discussion,” Byrd said. “There has never been a co-edited and authored by African American women former or present leaders in a predominantly white organization.” Byrd said the publishing is an opportunity to enlighten society and is a big step. Byrd was appointed to a three year term on the editorial board of ADHR in September. “Sue Lynham invited me to become a member of the editorial board. Getting this to print was a big step. When...

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