Job fairs, etiquette dinners prepare students for future
Oct13

Job fairs, etiquette dinners prepare students for future

Career Services hosted the Job and Internship Fair in Lord Conference Center this fall. Located on the second floor of Mabee, Career Services hosts several events throughout the semester to help students find jobs. There were 36 different booths set up at the fair. Students had the opportunity to visit with representatives from the various companies, score free merchandise, and submit resumes to potential employers. According to Career Services’ Director Don Owens, the university restructured the fair this year to include more majors. Before the restructuring, most of the booths were geared toward business and IT majors. Some of the companies at the fair included Baylor Scott and White Health, CGI, Farmer’s Insurance, FBI San Antonio, McLane, the U.S. Army, McLane Company and Dell. A unique feature of the job fairs is that students can submit their resumes before the event to be included in a resume guide that Owens gives to every employer. “[Employers] do not get a recruiter’s guide at many places,” he said. Senior finance major Kegan Hayes plans to graduate in May of 2018, and hopes that he will be called in for an interview with one of the companies he visited with at the fair. “I’ve talked to a couple of people and put my resume out there,” he said. “I’m excited to hear back from them.” Owens said that while employers such as IBM or one of the “Big 4” accounting firms aren’t represented a t the fair, students should attempt to practice their elevator speeches and find out about careers they may not have explored in the past. UMHB alumni Dylan Teepole (’15) and Lamar Seals (’16) were at the job fair representing CGI, where they work as a business analysts. “I remember coming to these things, and thinking that everybody is a big professional, but we’re all people here too,” Teepole said. Seals said that communication skills are imperative for any college student. “The way you present yourself is very important,” he said. “Don’t be afraid to talk to an employer because they’re a person like you’re a person.” The job fairs for each sector (business, education and nursing) are held twice a year, once in the spring and once in the fall. The teacher job fair will be in Lord Conference Center from 2 to 3:30 p.m. on Tuesday, Oct. 19. Owens said that 20 school districts have signed up for the fair. However, as many as 60 school districts have come to the spring fair in the past because more schools are hiring in the spring. Another career services event coming up is the annual senior etiquette dinner held...

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BSM restructure encourages involvement
Sep28

BSM restructure encourages involvement

UMHB’s Baptist Student Ministries recently experienced a leadership restructuring that leaders hope will get more students involved in campus ministry opportunities and bring students closer to Christ. The BSM is now divided into nine emphases, according to BSM Director Shawn Shannon. The nine divisions are: Campus Outreach, Church Relations, Community Partnerships, Faith in Action, Freshmen Outreach, International Engagement, Promotions, Specialized Ministries, and Student Missions. One or two Lead Team members head each emphasis. Three Core Team leaders oversee the Lead Team members. Then, Dr. Shannon and Assistant Dir ector Karl Baker split the emphases that they oversee. Each emphasis has several ministries underneath it. For example, under the Specialized Ministries emphasis, students can be involved in Drama Ministry, Heart for the Nations, and Worship in the Quad. Underneath Community Partnerships, there is Raising Arrows, Hope for the Hungry and Children’s Ministry. Shannon said that the flexibility to add various ministries under each emphasis is an advantage. “We had a freshman student that arose that said, ‘I really want to work with senior adults.’ So, by two weeks later we have a group going out to Park Place,” Shannon said. “Since then, we’ve had two other students come to us with ministries that will fit well under Community Partnerships.” The Gathering, which is held every Tuesday evening at the BSM building at 7:30 p.m, was created as a part of this restructure, so that students can meet with the Lead Team members to learn more about each emphasis, and how they can get involved. “During the Gathering, we usually have a “big group” time, which is unique every week… After that, we break out into each ministry emphasis, and students are welcome to attend any breakout session that interests them,” said junior Christian studies major Bekah Gaff who serves as a lead team member of Promotions. Shannon likes the Gathering because students can visit with each emphasis to find out where their strengths will best be used and cultivated. “It’s kind of like going to Sam’s on Saturday; there’s samples, so you can check things out,” Shannon said. Baker said that the Gathering is an easy on-ramp to get involved with ministries immediately. “If you showed up next week [to the Gathering], then you could jump into any of our 9 emphases, and make a real contribution right away,” he said. “Previously, it took a little more time. You could go to a ministry and learn more about it, but you were localized to just that one experience. You weren’t really tapping into the whole picture of the BSM.” Shannon said that her goal for the BSM is to nurture...

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Cleaning up the damage: Hurricane Harvey sweeps through 54 Texas counties, 70 dead
Sep18

Cleaning up the damage: Hurricane Harvey sweeps through 54 Texas counties, 70 dead

The long clean-up process continues for those affected by Category 4 Hurricane Harvey after it hit the Texas shore four miles east of Rockport with winds reaching up to 130 miles, on Friday, Aug. 25, at 9:45 p.m. It retreated only to return and hit land once again at midnight as a Category 3, at the northeastern shore of Copano Bay. Hurricane Harvey brought record amounts of rain to other areas, dumping more water than Hurricane Katrina, Sandy and Andrew combined. Over 50 inches of rain accumulated in the state of Texas, and Governor Greg Abbott declared a state of disaster in 54 counties (gov.Te xas.gov). Many people found themselves stranded on the roofs of their homes, and had to be rescued by boat. The death toll for Harvey has reached at least 70, and now Hurricane Irma has added to the nation’s death toll, as at least 15 have died in Florida. Senior public relations major Lynsey May, who is from Kingwood, Texas, said that her family was forced to evacuate due to the rising waters. Although the waters have now receded, when we spoke with May last Monday, water levels in her home were still rising. “The water has reached the inside of my house that is seven feet off the ground,” she said. “It has affected my family’s business and forced us not only to evacuate ourselves but our 29 horses as well.” May worried that her home would not be there when the waters finally receded. “We laid every brick of our barn. We danced on the floors of our house when we were building it. The memories will always be there, but the actual place that I call home might not be there.” Senior public relations major Paige Mareth, who is from Victoria, Texas, said that her parents chose to remain at her childhood home and weather the storm. “They’re without water and electricity and it may be that way for a while,” she said on Monday, Aug. 28. Mareth said that although it’s been an emotional week, she is thankful that her home sustained minimal damage. “Not everyone else in my little city was as fortunate, and that’s hard to know,” she said. Evacuees began arriving in Bell County from Brazoria County early Monday, Aug. 28. They were first transported to the Expo Center, where they were given dry clothes and shoes, and then taken to shelters that had been set up around Bell County. Vista Community Church took over the process of receiving donations. Volunteer Coordinator for Bell County, Lacey Dove, said that it was truly humbling to see the evacuees arriving...

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Beloved Miller Springs closes
Sep14

Beloved Miller Springs closes

Miller Springs Nature Center, east of Lake Belton, closed down in August. The center, which opened in October 1993, was a popular place for Central Texas hikers, fishers, bikers and nature lovers. The 260-acre land preservation, complete with hiking trails and various wildlife, was run by Miller Springs Alliance, a non-profit volunteer group. In 1993, the center took out a lease with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Since that time, the Alliance volunteers maintained the trails for the Center for Central Texas visitors to enjoy. The Alliance announced the closure of the park on Facebook, stating that due to lack of funding, they were ending their 24-year lease with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, and giving the land back to the Corps. “We appreciate all the support received through the years from volunteer projects, and we hate to see them end,” the center volunteers stated in their Facebook post. “Thank you for enjoying the Nature Center. It is a unique place in Central Texas, and we are saddened to see the gate closed.” Members of the community upset by the center’s closure are rallying together against the park closure with a Facebook group, Save Miller Springs Nature Center. As of this printing, more than 6,800 people have signed a petition on change.org for the park to reopen. Vanessa Duke, a Belton High School alumna from Killeen, started the petition. “I wanted to gather firm evidence of community support [that the park stays open] if it ever came into question.” Miller Springs has a special place in Duke’s heart because she frequented the park during her senior year of high school. “It’s a place right in our own backyard where we can enjoy the great outdoors and connect with nature.” Duke said that she’s tried reaching out to the city, but has not heard back yet. “Much of the city’s efforts have been concentrated towards Harvey relief, rightfully so,” she said. “As a result it’s been slow going.” Senior criminal justice major Chase McGhee was one of the signers of the petition. McGhe said he signed the petition because he frequently hikes and fishes at Miller Springs. “I shared the petition and had everyone I know sign it,” McGhee said. “Now that I go to UMHB, it is one of the few close hiking spots that we have.” McGhee said that he enjoyed going to the park because of the different features the park has to offer. “Miller Springs has a very diverse hiking experience,” he said. “There’s so many different sceneries as well: gravel creeks, a few caves, and rock cliffs that are great if you like rock...

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Harvey affects UMHB community
Aug31

Harvey affects UMHB community

A prayer vigil was held for students and faculty affected by Hurricane Harvey this last Tuesday evening at Luther Memorial on the UMHB campus in Belton. The university and local community of Belton and Bell County have been affected by Hurricane Harvey after it hit the Texas shore four miles east of Rockport as a category 4 hurricane with winds reaching up to 130 miles, on Friday, August 25, at 9:45 p.m. It retreated only to return and hit land once again that midnight as a category 3, at the northeastern shore of Copano Bay. Harvey brought record amounts of rain to other areas, dumping more water than Hurricane Katrina, Sandy, and Andrew combined. Over 50 inches of rain has been dumped on the state of Texas, and Governor Greg Abbott declared 54 counties as a state of disaster. Many people found themselves stranded on the roofs of their homes, and had to be rescued by boat. Hurricane Harvey, currently classified as a tropical depression, is expected to drift to the Gulf of Mexico before moving northeast towards Louisiana and Arkansas by Sat., Sept. 2. Senior public relations major Lynsey May, who is from Kingwood, TX, said that her family was forced to evacuate due to the rising waters. Although the waters have begun to recede, when we spoke with May on Monday, water levels in her home were still rising. “The water has reached the inside of my house that is seven feet off the ground,” she said. “It has affected my family’s business and forced us to not only evacuate ourselves but our 29 horses, as well.” May worries that her home may not be there when the waters finally recede. “We laid every brick of our barn. We nailed every screw in. We danced on the floors of our house when we were building it. The memories will always be there, but the actual place that I call home might not be there.” Senior public relations major Paige Mareth, who is from Victoria, TX, said that her parents chose to remain at her childhood home and weather the storm. “They’re without water and electricity and it may be that way for a while,” she said. Mareth said that although it’s been an emotional week, she is thankful that her home sustained minimal damage. “Not everyone else in my little city was as fortunate, and that’s hard to know,” she said. Hurricane Harvey evacuees began arriving from Brazoria County to Bell County early Monday morning. They were first transported to the Expo Center, where they were given dry clothes and shoes, and then they were taken to shelters...

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