Sharing the Gospel: students perform Easter Pageant for 78th time
Apr26

Sharing the Gospel: students perform Easter Pageant for 78th time

Published in the April 26, 2017 issue of The Bells “It is finished.” A crowd of students dressed in Biblical apparel cheer as Jesus’ last words on the cross are spoken, while a tearful audience of community members watch as the Gospel comes to life before their eyes. On Wednesday April 12, UMHB students took the stage for the 78th time to perform the Easter Pageant for friends, family and local residents at 12:30, 3 and 5:30 p.m. at Luther Memorial. This year, the Campus Activities Board broadcasted the 12:30 and 3 p.m. performances live on Facebook, so the students were able to literally perform the story of the Gospel to the whole world. University President Randy O’Rear chose senior public relations and music major Jacob Asmussen to play the role of Jesus, and he chose senior cellular biology major Sophie Rivera to portray Mary. Senior Christian studies major Maddie Rarick directed this year’s pageant. Asmussen chose those who portrayed his disciples, and he took careful consideration to pick a diverse group of men just as Jesus did. “I wanted guys who I really thought could benefit from the experience and really get something out of it. So I got a mix of friends and people I didn’t know as well, so it ended up being a patchwork of guys that really became a brotherhood.” Rarick and her assistant directors chose who portrayed the rest of the named roles such as Jarius and his wife, the bride and groom, Barabas, Pilate, and others. The crowd consisted of any student who was interested in being a part of Easter Pageant. Asmussen said that during this time he learned who he was in Christ. “It was a lot of growth in my own personal life with my relationship with Jesus and what I believe and really becoming who He’s created me to be,” he said. Senior business management major Caleb Latson, who portrayed the disciple Peter, enjoyed the time leading up to the Easter Pageant and working with Asmussen. “Jacob’s one of my closet friends , and that made it super easy to just relax and have fun during practice. At first it took some time for all the disciples to get comfortable around each other, but it didn’t take too long before we were all really good friends.” Asmussen said the actual day of the performance was exhausting, but he enjoyed it. “Each show had a different feel to it; something I learned from it. I was really thinking a lot that day about who Jesus is and who He is to me, and it was a very powerful day...

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‘Tale as old as time’ holds audiences captive
Mar29

‘Tale as old as time’ holds audiences captive

Published in the March 29, 2017 issue of The Bells A ‘tale as old as time’ debuted as a live-action film on the silver screen Friday March 17. Beauty and the Beast starred Emma Watson (Harry Potter franchise) as Belle and Dan Stevens (Downtown Abbey, Night of the Musuem 3) as the Beast. The Plot The movie follows the classic storyline of the original animated film that was released in 1991. The film begins with an enchantress transforming the arrogant, party-throwing prince (Stevens) into a hideous beast and his staff into household objects. Fast-forward many years later, and we are introduced to Belle (Watson), a sweet, book-lover yearning to leave her quiet town. Handsome, but vain, war hero Gaston (Luke Evans) wants to marry Belle, but she will have nothing to do with this pompous man. Belle finds herself at the beast’s castle after her father, Maurice (Kevin Kline) is imprisoned for stealing a rose. Belle takes her father’s place, and becomes a prisoner in the beast’s castle. The castle staff, led by the candelabra, Lumiere (Ewan MCGregor), the clock, Cogsworth (Ian McKellen), and the teapot, Mrs. Potts (Emma Thompson) scheme to get Belle and the beast to fall in love and break the curse. Was it any good? In a word, yes. Watson’s Belle was charming. In the market scene where we first meet Belle, Watson does a remarkable job of proving to the audience how ‘strange yet special’ she really is compared to the rest of the villagers. She even teaches a child to read, while her invention involving a donkey does laundry for her. One of my favorite performances was by Evans as Gaston. In the beginning, we start to sympathize with Gaston as he tries to win Belle’s hand. But as Gaston’s nastiness unfolds throughout the film we find ourselves wishing for his demise. Evans’ Gaston is humorous at times but truly despicable. He is a villain in every sense of the word. His treatment of Maurice is much harsher in this film. The costumes, the set, and the songs were flawless. “Be Our Guest,” a fan favorite song in the original, is a spectacle to behold with plates dancing, fireworks, and colors galore. What was new? Unlike the animated version, the film added in a few scenes that explain both Belle and the beast’s growing up years. The film gives us a glimpse of why Belle only grew up with a single parent and why the prince is so nasty. The film not only has the original songs, but there are also a few new ones. One of the new songs, “Evermore,” performed by...

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Foreman delivers McLane Lecture Heavyweight champion shares message of perseverance and faith
Mar29

Foreman delivers McLane Lecture Heavyweight champion shares message of perseverance and faith

Published in the March 29, 2017 issue of The Bells Heavyweight champion, minister and entrepreneur are just a few roles George Foreman is known for by his adoring fans. On Wed. March 22, Foreman shared personal life experiences with faculty, staff and community members during the annual McLane Lecture sponsored by Elizabeth and Drayton McLane Jr. The lecture began with McLane introducing Foreman by describing a few of his accomplishments, including fathering 10 children, five of them named George. “I was in the room one time and somebody asked him why he named them all George, and he said, ‘if you’ve been hit in the head as many times as I have, you’d name them all George too,’” McLane said to a burst of laughter from the audience. Foreman set up his lecture by telling about an experience he had sharing his past with one of his sons. He began with his childhood in Houston’s 5th Ward, where he frequently skipped school. As a teenager, Foreman began stealing and mugging people with other boys in the neighborhood. After one such mugging, Foreman had to hide from the police underneath a house and cover himself with sewage slime to keep police dogs from sniffing him out. “I said if I get out from under this house, I will never steal anything again.” Foreman then joined the United States Department of Labor Job Corps to get a fresh start. While at the job corps, Foreman became interested in amateur boxing. He decided to transfer to California to go to boxing school. A year later, he earned a spot on the 1968 US Olympic team, where he competed in Mexico City. “My mom never wanted me to box. After I told [my mom] I was fighting a Russian, she didn’t even tell me to hurry home and eat, she said, ‘well, bye.’” Foreman defeated the Russian boxer to become the Olympic Gold medalist in boxing. “That was probably the happiest moment I’ve had in my athletic career,” Foreman said. “For the first time in my life a dream had come true.” Foreman began his professional boxing career after the Olympics. He fought in many matches, before he was matched against the reigning heavyweight champion of the world, Joe Frazier. “Joe Frazier was the type of fellow that they said you hit and he liked it. If you missed him, he got upset… He had beaten everyone.” Foreman knocked out Frazier during the second round to become the heavyweight champion of the world. “I stood in the ring, and I was all those [former] champions in that moment.” Foreman also recounted his famous...

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Organization spotlight: Cru Film
Mar08

Organization spotlight: Cru Film

Published in the March 8, 2017 issue of The Bells Lights, Camera, Action. Cru Film is a student-led organization for students who love being in the limelight or behind-the-scenes of a production. Cru Film president, senior film studies major Oliver Ortiz, helped charter Cru Films about a year ago. “We had something similar to it back in the day, but we totally revamped it, and believe it’s going to really help film studies majors in a big way.” Cru Film is open to all students, no matter their major. “You don’t have to be a film studies major,” said sophomore journalism and film studies major Peter Zuniga said. “It’s for whoever wants to be a part of making films.” The organization’s goal is to produce a short-film every semester. This semester, they’re in the process of filming Boys, a short film written and directed by Ortiz. “Boys is a script I was writing for fun for about a year, and my professor wanted to use it so I said, ‘alright, let’s do it.’ Then I polished it up and got it film ready.” Boys will star Caleb Latson, Aaron Midkiff, Thomas Robinson, and Ben Roark as title characters Russell, Philip, James, and Tucker. “[The film is] set in the 80’s, and is about four boys who are high school friends whose curiosity often gets them into some risky situations,” Ortiz said. “When they decide to seek adventure outside the comforts of their small hometown, the uncertainty of the real world causes the boys to split, leaving one of the four to continue alone.” Once the film has been edited, Zuniga said the organization would like to have a viewing party at Grand Avenue Theater. “We’re still going to figure out how people are going to view it first, and what the event’s going to look like,” Zuniga said. “It’ll definitely be online everywhere,” he said. Ortiz says he enjoys Cru Film because students have the opportunity to learn how to work as a team and gain experience in the film industry. “I enjoy Cru Film because it gives us the opportunity to work with a crew, gain experience, and to create interesting stories that are created by the students.” Zuniga said that the organization needs students to carry on roles that will be left empty after the end of the spring semester with Ortiz graduating. “We’re making do with what we have right now, and it’s working, but we would love to have a bigger crew,” he said. “Oliver’s graduating this semester, so we’re going to need people who want to do video editing and be more involved in...

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University and city  government  work together  for change
Mar08

University and city government work together for change

Published in the March 8, 2017 issue of The Bells As the UMHB campus has evolved over the years, the university has maintained a healthy relationship with city officials and local government. The university recently worked with the city of Belton to make decisions concerning building and road projects like the newly-completed MLK bridge that leads to Loop 121. “That project in itself took years of planning. A decade ago it was just undeveloped land that the city knew that one day we would need to connect this road to get traffic off of Main Street. But it took a lot of planning, coordination and securing of a grant to make it happen,” said Belton Public Information Officer Paul Romer. “The university contributed $200,000 to that project.” Romer believes that Crusader Stadium had a direct impact on the success of the MLK bridge. “I don’t think it [MLK bridge] would have been built if the new stadium hadn’t been constructed,” he said. “The new stadium is going to be used by people coming in and out, and it’s a catalyst for other projects.” The officer said the city had to prepare Belton’s infrastructure for the building of Cru Stadium. One way they did that was by putting a new sewer pipe in by the stadium to prepare for the thousands of people who would be using the restroom at the new stadium during halftime. “There had to be a change in infrastructure before that was ever built. People don’t ever think that we come in, dig up the ground, and put in bigger pipes, but that has an impact later on down the road,” he said. “A lot of times the city will do it if there’s any opportunity to connect that pipe to future businesses we’ll go ahead and run that and it saves time and money.” The university also recently contributed $100,000 to the upcoming extension of the hiking and biking trail that runs alongside the edge of the College View apartments. The path will now be extended to University Drive and then to Sparta Drive once completed. “You’ll be able to get from Lake Belton all the way to 35 on sidewalk or hiking trail,” Romer said. “I think there’s things that students aren’t aware of that are occurring because of the cooperation of the city and the school.” Romer said City Hall has had a positive experience with students thus far. Several work study students help out in different departments such as the parks department. Another work study student works at City Hall digitizing old city records. Belton’s Chamber of Commerce has also created Apprentice...

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