Stay on top of your semester: Time management tricks for students
Sep12

Stay on top of your semester: Time management tricks for students

The life of college student isn’t always easy. Between trying to get good grades, maintaining a social life, going to church, staying healthy, and getting a decent amount of sleep each night, we have a lot on our plate. How do we do it without going crazy? Time management is the key for any college student to survive. Here are a few tips to manage your time wisely: 1) Write everything down If I don’t write something down, I won’t remember it. So, when you’re in class and your professor gives you a due date and extra information on your homework assignment, jot it down. This way you can go back in your notes and remember exactly when the due date is for your upcoming homework assignment. 2) Maintain a planner This is a cheap and easy way to remember due dates, your boyfriend’s or girlfriend’s birthday and the dates of the Cru’s football games. It’s all in one place. Some people like to color code their planner. Whatever works best for you. If you’re not a fan of planners, at the very least make a list of upcoming assignments starting with the one that’s due first. Prioritize assignments. Don’t work on an assignment that’s due 5 weeks from now if you have one that needs to be finished by tomorrow. 3) Make time for fun “All work and no play make Jack a dull boy.” You can’t study 24/7. UMHB has many student organizations to get involved in. Just don’t overload yourself with too many organizations. Find a couple that you are passionate about, attend their meetings, participate in organization activities and make friends. 4) Don’t be distracted by electronics We all get into the habit of working on an assignment, picking up our phone for just a minute or two, and suddenly 30 minutes has passed while we were checking our Facebook and Instagram. When studying or working on homework, put your phone away. Whether you must put it in your desk drawer or tuck it into the pocket of your backpack, put it away so you’ll be less likely to get distracted. 5) Don’t wait until the night before Many students think they can wait until the night before to finish an assignment due the next day. Speaking from personal experience, waiting until the night before to complete an assignment is very stressful. If you have a large assignment that is going to take you many hours, start early. Get a little bit done each week. This way you will not be stressing the night before. It will also give you time to ask your professor...

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Information session for veterans and dependants
Sep12

Information session for veterans and dependants

Veteran Career Advisor Sarah Phillips told veterans about eight different programs available to them. This occurred when UMHB’s chapter of Salute Veteran’s National Honor Society sponsored a Texas Veteran’s Commission information session in the Lord Conference Center located in Parker Academic Center on Tuesday, Sep. 4. These eight different programs she addressed are: The Claims Department of the Texas Veteran’s Commission helps veterans who have a discharge other than honorable to upgrade their discharge so they can get access to benefits. The Education De- partment approves all VA schools in Texas, and they approve on-the-job training programs. The Entrepreneur program helps veterans start and expand a business. The Fund for Veterans Assistance program provides grants to charitable organizations that provide direct assistance to veterans. The Healthcare Advocate program helps veterans navigate through the VA Hospital. The Mental Health program provides training to veterans, their families, and licensed mental health providers. The Woman Veterans program helps female veterans get the benefits they have earned. The employment program helps veterans fine-tune their resumes, plus look for and obtain jobs. Phillips spoke on the importance of having a master resume. “A master resume is usually a monster of a document. You don’t send it to anyone, but you keep track of everything you have ever done on this document,” she said. “You want to keep it updated as much as you can.” Phillips said that students should highlight how they can be team players on their resumes. “You can’t train someone to be a team player,” Phillips said. “If there’s some aspect [on a group project] that you took the lead on, say it ,” she said. Phillips also spoke about potential employers labeling candidates as over-qualified. “The reason that you’re told you’re over-qualified is because you’re putting things like you’re a leader on your resume, even though the position doesn’t require it,” she said. Phillips also said that having volunteer experience gives students hands-on experience with the job that they are interested in. “A lot of companies would love to have someone work for them for free. It’s also a great networking opportunity,” she said. Phillips also spoke about the VA work-study program. This program is available to veterans or their spouses that are in school and utilizing the GI bill. Students can work on average 25-hours a week for $7.25 per hour with this program. Phillips said that she has a passion for speaking to veterans about finding a job because she used to be in their shoes. “I was a veteran who didn’t know how to find a job,” Phillips said. “I walked into the workforce center thinking I...

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Coach ‘Fred’ inducted into Texas Sports Hall of Fame
Apr11

Coach ‘Fred’ inducted into Texas Sports Hall of Fame

Football Head Coach Pete ‘Fred’ Fredenburg was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame Saturday, April 7 in Waco, Texas. The University of Mary Hardin-Baylor head coach was inducted along with eight other well-known Texas athletes and coaches in the class of 2018. Coach Fredenburg was inducted along with former Texas A&M running back Johnny Bailey (deceased), former University of Texas basketball and volleyball player Nell Fortner, Texas A&M quarterback and Super Bowl winning Head Coach Gary Kubiak, Duncanville girls basketball coach Cathy Self-Morgan, former Texas Tech basketball coach and athletic director Gerald Myers, Olympic medalist and former University of Texas swimmer Jill Sterkel, Texas Ranger Michael Young, and University of Texas National Champion quarterback Vince Young. Coach Fredenburg started UMHB’s football program from the ground up 20 years ago in 1998. Since this time, Fredenburg has led the Cru to an overall record of 210-39, 15 American Southwest Conference titles and the 2016 NCAA Division III National Championship. Under Fredenburg’s leadership the Cru has played in the Alonzo Stagg Bowl for the national championship three times. He is a winner of the Liberty Mutual Division III Coach of the Year (2014) award and the American Football Coaches Association Division III National Coach of the Year (2016) award. In the press conference, Fredenburg stated that when he came to UMHB, the football program didn’t have any equipment, coaches, or even a field. “I made a plan to try to get within a 75-mile radius of Belton to tell our story,” Coach Fred said. “We felt like that 100 guys would be a break even for the program. We had 217 guys show up that first year.” Jerrell Freeman, former Chicago Bear linebacker and UMHB alumnus played underneath Coach Fredenburg’s leadership from 2004-08. Freeman attended of the induction ceremony for the famers. “It’s been a long time coming,” Freeman said. “He’s an old school coach, so you know exactly what you’re getting from him. He’s built a really great program. He’s tough, but he knows what it takes to win.” Fredenburg also has ties with two of the other inductees, Nell Fortner and Gerald Myers. Fredenburg’s wife, Karen, used to coach Fortner and would sometimes have her husband come to basketball practice to guard Fortner. Also, Fredenburg briefly attended Monterrey High School in Lubbock, where Myers coached. Myers approached Fredenburg about playing basketball for the team. “He was a good athlete, and I was looking forward to coaching. But then his family moved. If he had stayed in Monterrey, he might have gotten a basketball scholarship [for college],” Myers said. During Fredenburg’s acceptance speech, he discussed living in the...

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The Old Maid and The Thief: An uncomfortable situation that “dominoes”
Apr11

The Old Maid and The Thief: An uncomfortable situation that “dominoes”

UMHB music professors George and Penny Hogan are once again to conduct the theatre’s newest opera, The Lady and the Thief. This is the first opera to be performed in the new Sue & Frank Mayborn Performing Art Center on Friday, April 13 at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday at 2:30 p.m. Alumni will also be performing in this year’s show. The Lady and the Thief is a one-act grotesque, radio opera that takes place in 1939. NBC Radio commissioned Gian Carlo Menotti to write this opera for their radio program. Professor George Hogan said there’s a lot to learn from the opera. “This [opera] is situationally grotesque,” George Hogan said. “There’s life lessons you can take away. We’re looking at the human condition in this. It’s basically grotesque hospitality.” Hogan describes the plot of the opera and how situational hospitality plays a part in it. Hogan said that there is an old spinster, Miss Todd, who has a younger maid. There’s also a town gossip named Miss Pinkerton, who comes over one night to talk about the new minister. Hogan said that they’re having tea, there’s a knock at the door and a man who’s drenched from the storm outside. Hogan said the first grotesque hospitality occurs when the two women do what nobody in their right mind would do- invite the strange man into the house. He said the situation dominoes from there with one uncomfortable decision after another. The Hogans are trying something new with this Opera since it was originally on the radio before it was ever performed live. “We’re going to have a foley artist (someone who creates all the sounds on the radio),” George Hogan said. “We’re setting up the pit to be the NBC radio studio… then we’re running two scrims, which is like a veil.” George Hogan said that while the singers are in the pit, the actors will be up on stage. The Hogans said that the actors are supposed to be a part of your imagination as you listen to a radio program. “It’s been really exciting to see this unfold, because it’s a new way to present this,” Penny Hogan said. George Hogan hopes that the opera provides more than just entertainment. “I hope it’s thought-provoking like a sermon would be.” George Hogan says that it’s been different being in the PAC this year instead of at the Cultural Activities Center in Temple. “This has been a learning curve, but there’s been some really wonderful blessings… We’re excited about being in our new building. It’s kind of a freshman year for all of us.” The performances will be tonight...

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The real meaning behind charity
Apr11

The real meaning behind charity

It’s 2018. Why is poverty still a major challenge? Why are third world countries still struggling? Every year, kind-hearted people box up old clothes and donate money to send to these countries, but we’re not seeing results. Poverty, Inc., a documentary by Michael Miller and Mark Weber that has received 30 film festival honors and won 11 awards, attempts to address this problem. According to the documentary, the reason we are not seeing results is, because emergency disaster relief has become a permanent model. The documentary suggests that it might be time to stop sending clothes, money and shoes to third world countries. According to Huffington Post, the East African Community made up of Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania, Burandi, and Rwanda, have proposed to ban all imported used clothing by 2019. According to the same article, (Goldberg, 2016), the clothes that are being donated are being resold for extremely low prices such as in the Gikomba Market, located in East Africa. The article said that jeans can retail for as low as $1.50 at the market, which is between five to 10 percent of a new clothing item made in Kenya. Movie stars, presidents, pastors, non-profit institutions, and just regular people push to send more items to developing countries. But it may not encourage new economies if goods are handed over for free. It was pointed out in the Poverty, Inc. film that these countries don’t need fish handed to them; they need to be taught how to grow a fish economy. I agree. We can’t keep treating these countries like they are in a permanent state of disaster. They shouldn’t be treated as the beggars under the global table, when they deserve a seat at the table. These countries are rich in natural resources that can make a profit. Africa holds approximately 30 percent of the world’s natural resources. It is rich with diamonds, gold, nickel, titanium, oil and gas (Aljazeera.com). Haiti’s natural resources include bauxite, copper, calcium, carbonite, gold and marble (Haitigeo). As a society, we need to rediscover the true meaning of charity. Charity isn’t only about writing checks or sending over a box of used clothing to Africa or Haiti. According to Weber, co-filmmaker of Poverty, Inc., the Latin root word of charity is “caritas,” meaning love. 1 Corinthians states: “And now these three remain: faith, hope and love, but the greatest of these is love.” We must stop letting those we help become faceless and nameless. Real love is more than writing a check. Real love is about getting more involved than just a one-time visit. We really should look at how to love others...

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