Organization spotlight: Cru Film
Mar08

Organization spotlight: Cru Film

Published in the March 8, 2017 issue of The Bells Lights, Camera, Action. Cru Film is a student-led organization for students who love being in the limelight or behind-the-scenes of a production. Cru Film president, senior film studies major Oliver Ortiz, helped charter Cru Films about a year ago. “We had something similar to it back in the day, but we totally revamped it, and believe it’s going to really help film studies majors in a big way.” Cru Film is open to all students, no matter their major. “You don’t have to be a film studies major,” said sophomore journalism and film studies major Peter Zuniga said. “It’s for whoever wants to be a part of making films.” The organization’s goal is to produce a short-film every semester. This semester, they’re in the process of filming Boys, a short film written and directed by Ortiz. “Boys is a script I was writing for fun for about a year, and my professor wanted to use it so I said, ‘alright, let’s do it.’ Then I polished it up and got it film ready.” Boys will star Caleb Latson, Aaron Midkiff, Thomas Robinson, and Ben Roark as title characters Russell, Philip, James, and Tucker. “[The film is] set in the 80’s, and is about four boys who are high school friends whose curiosity often gets them into some risky situations,” Ortiz said. “When they decide to seek adventure outside the comforts of their small hometown, the uncertainty of the real world causes the boys to split, leaving one of the four to continue alone.” Once the film has been edited, Zuniga said the organization would like to have a viewing party at Grand Avenue Theater. “We’re still going to figure out how people are going to view it first, and what the event’s going to look like,” Zuniga said. “It’ll definitely be online everywhere,” he said. Ortiz says he enjoys Cru Film because students have the opportunity to learn how to work as a team and gain experience in the film industry. “I enjoy Cru Film because it gives us the opportunity to work with a crew, gain experience, and to create interesting stories that are created by the students.” Zuniga said that the organization needs students to carry on roles that will be left empty after the end of the spring semester with Ortiz graduating. “We’re making do with what we have right now, and it’s working, but we would love to have a bigger crew,” he said. “Oliver’s graduating this semester, so we’re going to need people who want to do video editing and be more involved in...

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University and city  government  work together  for change
Mar08

University and city government work together for change

Published in the March 8, 2017 issue of The Bells As the UMHB campus has evolved over the years, the university has maintained a healthy relationship with city officials and local government. The university recently worked with the city of Belton to make decisions concerning building and road projects like the newly-completed MLK bridge that leads to Loop 121. “That project in itself took years of planning. A decade ago it was just undeveloped land that the city knew that one day we would need to connect this road to get traffic off of Main Street. But it took a lot of planning, coordination and securing of a grant to make it happen,” said Belton Public Information Officer Paul Romer. “The university contributed $200,000 to that project.” Romer believes that Crusader Stadium had a direct impact on the success of the MLK bridge. “I don’t think it [MLK bridge] would have been built if the new stadium hadn’t been constructed,” he said. “The new stadium is going to be used by people coming in and out, and it’s a catalyst for other projects.” The officer said the city had to prepare Belton’s infrastructure for the building of Cru Stadium. One way they did that was by putting a new sewer pipe in by the stadium to prepare for the thousands of people who would be using the restroom at the new stadium during halftime. “There had to be a change in infrastructure before that was ever built. People don’t ever think that we come in, dig up the ground, and put in bigger pipes, but that has an impact later on down the road,” he said. “A lot of times the city will do it if there’s any opportunity to connect that pipe to future businesses we’ll go ahead and run that and it saves time and money.” The university also recently contributed $100,000 to the upcoming extension of the hiking and biking trail that runs alongside the edge of the College View apartments. The path will now be extended to University Drive and then to Sparta Drive once completed. “You’ll be able to get from Lake Belton all the way to 35 on sidewalk or hiking trail,” Romer said. “I think there’s things that students aren’t aware of that are occurring because of the cooperation of the city and the school.” Romer said City Hall has had a positive experience with students thus far. Several work study students help out in different departments such as the parks department. Another work study student works at City Hall digitizing old city records. Belton’s Chamber of Commerce has also created Apprentice...

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Saving money on clothes
Feb22

Saving money on clothes

Published in the February 22, 2017 issue of The Bells As a college student, money is tight. Between tuition, food, and gas, there isn’t much money left over to spend on clothing. Here are a few stores to check out to find cute styles at low prices. 1. Shar’s Consignment 1615 Canyon Creek Dr, Temple, TX 76502 Although slightly more expensive than a Goodwill, Shar’s Consignment is a great place to find name brand clothing for less. Plus they have some adorable boutique clothing for sale. If you’re thinking about getting rid of clothes, you can take them to Shar’s to receive store credit towards future purchases. 2. Scott and White Hospice Thrift Store 2160 N Main St Belton, TX 76513 Located about three minutes from campus, this thrift store has everything you could ever want: men’s and women’s clothing, formal wear, furniture, dishes, DVDs, purses, and jewelry. Because of the store’s reasonable prices, store manager Susan Robison said she was able to decorate her son’s entire apartment for a small amount of money. 3. Plato’s Closet 3213 E Central Texas Expy, Killeen, TX 76543 If you’re looking to get rid of name brand clothing, look no further than Plato’s Closet. They give cash or store credit in return for donations. Plato’s Closet looks for clothing that is on-trend, so you can keep up with the latest styles without paying mall prices. 4. Ross and Marshall’s 2112 SW H K Dodgen Lp Temple Town Square Temple, TX 76504 Located right next to each other, these two stores offer clothing. purses, shoes, home décor, and cookwear with significantly lower prices than typical department...

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Who produces and distributes the Stall Street Journal?
Feb08

Who produces and distributes the Stall Street Journal?

Published in the February 22, 2017 issue of The Bells When students go into public restrooms on campus, there is a good chance they’ll see a bright, cheerful newsletter on the stall door. The Stall Street Journal gives helpful information on campus events and provides tips on maintaining a healthy lifestyle. The Journal was created in 1998 by the former campus nurse, Jeanne Duphree, who got the idea from going to Chili’s and seeing scores posted in the restroom. Depree knew that the article would have guaranteed readership, so she brought the idea to UMHB. The publication was a collaboration between several staff before the secretary of Health, Counseling and Testing Services, Heather Hansen, took over the job five years ago. Now she writes, designs, and distributes the Journal. Hansen said that many students are surprised when they find out that the journal is produced by the Health, Counseling, and Testing Services. “It’s kind of fun that way. [The students] are like, ‘I wonder who writes it,’ … I was putting it out in the bathrooms, and one of the student workers said ‘y’all write that? We love that.’ It seems to be pretty popular, and everyone seems to like it,” she said. The template Hansen uses was created by art students when she first took over the journal. “We had a competition where they could create the template, and then we chose one. We’ve had that one for a while, so we’re probably going to do something like that soon to freshen it up a bit.” Hansen gets her writing inspiration from the counselors and the trends they see from the students who come into the center. The journal is a helpful and easy read for students and faculty. “The information about physical health, mental health, and spiritual health is what we want to get out to the students,” she said. “We put in whatever we think will be relevant to the students. But we also address some things that the faculty can relate to.” The February issue focused on taking care of the physical body because Feb. 22 through March 4 is Eating Disorder Awareness Week. The issue included tips on investing in yourself, attitudes toward weight and self-worth, and eating disorder statistics. The issue also includes urls to websites such as Huffingtonpost.com, counseling.uogregion.edu, and eatingdisorderhope.com, along with information about when food spots on campus are open. “The 18-24 age group is really affected by eating disorders, so we always make sure we talk about that every year at this time.” Freshman nursing major Lauren Houston said she often reads the Stall Street Journal. “I like it...

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Non-traditional students share stories of second chances, hope
Feb08

Non-traditional students share stories of second chances, hope

Published in the February 8, 2017 issue of The Bells What do a 37-year-old single mom and a 61-year-old grandmother have in common? They are both non-traditional students at the university. Whether they’re former military or just having a second act, non-traditional students ages 25 and above make-up 22.5 percent of the university population. Junior Elena Aydelotte is a single mother of three working towards a public relations degree. When Aydelotte had children, she still had a dream to go to school, so she made a deal with her husband. She would stay home with the children until the youngest started school and then she could attend college. Before this deal could come to fruition, Aydelotte’s marriage sadly ended. So, she packed up her family, and moved back to Temple from North Carolina. As Aydelotte explored her next steps, she realized she had two options: go to work or attend college. The young mother decided she would explore her college options. With her best friend by her side, she walked into the UMHB admissions office for some advice. “I walked in and they’re like arms wide-open, ‘Welcome to UMHB,’ and I was like, ‘I just need an application. I don’t know if I can even afford to go here.’” She began a conversation with one of the admissions counselors and discovered that the counselor’s mother had gone back to school when she was a single mother, and eventually earned her degree. “By the time I walked out of that office, we were hugging, crying, and they were welcoming me to UMHB. I walked away with a neon billboard light going off in my mind saying ‘this is where you need to be.’” Aydelotte wants single moms to know that their story isn’t over because of the grace of God. She encourages them to reach for their dreams, no matter the hardships they’re faced with. She said He [God] has a message for other single moms too. “The dream He’s placed in their hearts is still valid. It’s not void, and they can accomplish it.” Aydelotte loves UMHB because she can openly profess her faith and learn at the same time. “The university was founded by women of faith, and all their traditions continue on, and I’m honored to be a Crusader.” Aydelotte has busy days between going to school, taking care of her family, getting homework and housework done, attending church, and somehow enjoying a social life as well. She firmly believes that having a relationship with God is how she gets through the day. “He gives me the extra grace and energy to do it,” she said. “Spending...

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