UMHB alumnus brings new life to downtown theater
Oct26

UMHB alumnus brings new life to downtown theater

The Beltonian Theatre, originally built in the 1920s, will reopen for audiences to enjoy classic films Friday, Nov. 3. Because the new owner of the renovated theater is owned by UMHB alumnus, Zechariah Baker, it will accept Cru cash. Baker, who graduated from the university in 2005 with a bachelor’s degree in music, bought the theater three weeks ago. “I’ve wanted to open my own business since I was a kid,” he said. “About three or four years ago, I was managing a movie theater, and I saw the Beltonian was for sale. I started saving and planning. Everything fell the right way a couple of months ago.” The Beltonian, located at 219 E. Central Ave, boasts a 150-seat screening room complete with a small stage. Baker hopes to show classic films, UMHB games and other sporting events, and silent films. He will also be bringing in local artists. “A lot of these old classic movies are films that people saw when they grew up and now can only watch at home,” Baker said. “Now, they’ll be able to see quality classics on a big screen again in a great theater that has a long history in Belton.” Central Texas native and country singer Jenna McDaniel will kick-off opening weekend with a concert from 7 to 9 p.m on Friday, Nov. 3. Then Baker will play The Magnificent Seven (1969) starring Yul Brynner, Steven McQueen and Charles Bronson. The theatre will be open on Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays, and Sundays. Baker also plans to keep the theatre open every day during the summer months. Tickets will be $3.99 apiece. “A lot of folks in the area have been to the theatre when they were kids,” Baker said. “I want to be able to provide the same kind of experience they got at a discount price.” The Beltonian will not only be showing classic films, but it will also serve buttery popcorn, cotton candy, fountain drinks, candy and a few locally-made gourmet items. Baker hopes that UMHB students will come to the theater for an inexpensive and fun experience. “It’s going to be affordable and close to [campus],” he said. “I’m working with several different organizations on the campus to get some activities here.” UMHB Junior Noah Crosby remembers visiting the theater as a child, when his church rented the theater to show a Gospel movie. “I went there with some old friends of mine, and they were serving popcorn,” Crosby said. “It was nice on the inside with dark red carpet. Crosby regrets that he didn’t go more often when he was younger. “I’ll probably go again. I didn’t know...

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Why I believe that it is important to stand by the American flag
Oct13

Why I believe that it is important to stand by the American flag

I stand for the flag because the world is a better place with America, and I believe that is worth honoring. The NFL 2017 season has been defined by players taking a knee during the National Anthem, which has led to controversy, intense media coverage, and even social media hashtags. These players are taking a knee to protest racially-targeted police brutality and general racial inequality in America. While their points are valid, kneeling before the anthem not only harms their message, but is insensitive to the meaning of our flag. Over the years, America has achieved many things. In 1776, thirteen colonies signed the Declaration of Independence, declaring America free from British rule. In 1863, President Lincoln delivered the Emancipation Proclamation that eventually freed more than four million slaves. In 1920, women were granted the right to vote. In 1964, the Civil Rights Act declared segregation illegal. In 1969, the first man walked on the moon. In 2008, the American people elected the first African-American president. Because of these accomplishments and so many more, I am going to continue standing for the flag. I like how USA Today writer, Martin Dempsey, states it. “We do so not because we agree with everything America has done, or everything that has been done in America’s name, but because despite all of that the world is a better place because America exists.” America has various moments that she’s not proud of, but there are many moments to be proud of. According to Bloomberg Businessweek, there are 1.3 million active-duty personnel in the U.S. military and an additional 800,000 in reserves. The military is a volunteer program. That means that 1.3 million Americans volunteered to be a part of an organization, where they risk their lives for their country. They are not denying America’s mistakes and wrongs with blind patriotism. Instead, they have chosen to defend the rights. These rights are worth honoring. Growing up in a military town, I’ve seen firsthand the struggles that soldiers and their families endure. The military lifestyle is not for everyone. I’ve grown close with church friends, only for them to leave when their mom or dad is reassigned to another base. Recently, the cousin of a friend from high school disappeared while actively serving his country, and I watched my friend and his family honor his sacrifice and heroism. When I see the flag, I think of my family members who have served, I think of my friends, and I think of veterans who served in World War II and subsequent wars. And I think of America’s rights and future rights. America’s wrongs can’t be fixed...

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Blast From the Past: Classic TV shows  to revisit
Oct13

Blast From the Past: Classic TV shows to revisit

As a child, I grew up watching classic TV shows in black and white (and sometimes color). The older shows always had more appeal for me because they were clean, wholesome entertainment. Here are four of the best classic TV shows to check out. The Andy Griffith Show (1960-1968) What’s it about: Sheriff Andy Taylor (Andy Griffith) is a widower in the little town of Mayberry, North Carolina. Andy lives with his son, Opie (Ron Howard), and his Aunt Bee (Frances Bavier). Andy has his hands full refereeing small-time scuffles and reigning in his bumbling deputy, Barney Fife’s (Don Knott) well-meaning, but over-zealous schemes. Why you should watch it: The town of Mayberry and its citizens are easy to fall in love with. The stories are engaging and the jokes are corny. Andy doesn’t particularly follow a storyline, so you can jump in wherever you feel like it. In my opinion, the first six seasons, which are in black and white, are the best. Availability: All eight seasons of Andy can be found on Netflix. Favorite episodes: The Pickle Story (season 2, episode 11), Convicts at Large (season 3, episode 11), A Wife for Andy (season 3, episode 29) I Love Lucy (1951-1957) What’s it about: Lucy Ricardo (Lucille Ball) is a housewife that constantly creates havoc for her Cuban bandleader husband, Ricky Ricardo (Desi Arnaz), as he strives to succeed in show business in New York City. The Ricardo’s live in an apartment complex owned by their best friends, Fred and Ethel Mertz (William Frawley and Vivian Vance). Why you should watch it: You will never find another actress like Lucille Ball. She is one-of-a-kind. Her physical comedy is amazing. The chemistry between the four friends is heart-warming. And the episodes are just plain hilarious. Availability: Lucy episodes can be found on Hulu, CBS, and the Hallmark Channel. Favorite episodes: Lucy Thinks Ricky is Trying to Murder Her (season 1, episode 4), Job Switching (season 2, episode 1), First Stop (season 4, episode 13) The Big Valley (1965-1969) What’s it about: The story centers around the wealthiest family in Stockton, California during the 1870s, The Barkley’s. The Barkley’s matriarch, Victoria Barkley (Barbara Stanwyck), lives on the Barkley Ranch with her sons, Nick (Peter Breck) and Jarrod (Richard Long), daughter, Audra (Linda Evans), and step-son Heath (Lee Majors). Why you should watch it: I have never been a big fan of Western’s, but I love The Big Valley. This western offers a little bit of everything: family, gun slinging, danger, humor, and romance. The Big Valley definitely isn’t a comedy like the others. It depicts the Wild West in...

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Job fairs, etiquette dinners prepare students for future
Oct13

Job fairs, etiquette dinners prepare students for future

Career Services hosted the Job and Internship Fair in Lord Conference Center this fall. Located on the second floor of Mabee, Career Services hosts several events throughout the semester to help students find jobs. There were 36 different booths set up at the fair. Students had the opportunity to visit with representatives from the various companies, score free merchandise, and submit resumes to potential employers. According to Career Services’ Director Don Owens, the university restructured the fair this year to include more majors. Before the restructuring, most of the booths were geared toward business and IT majors. Some of the companies at the fair included Baylor Scott and White Health, CGI, Farmer’s Insurance, FBI San Antonio, McLane, the U.S. Army, McLane Company and Dell. A unique feature of the job fairs is that students can submit their resumes before the event to be included in a resume guide that Owens gives to every employer. “[Employers] do not get a recruiter’s guide at many places,” he said. Senior finance major Kegan Hayes plans to graduate in May of 2018, and hopes that he will be called in for an interview with one of the companies he visited with at the fair. “I’ve talked to a couple of people and put my resume out there,” he said. “I’m excited to hear back from them.” Owens said that while employers such as IBM or one of the “Big 4” accounting firms aren’t represented a t the fair, students should attempt to practice their elevator speeches and find out about careers they may not have explored in the past. UMHB alumni Dylan Teepole (’15) and Lamar Seals (’16) were at the job fair representing CGI, where they work as a business analysts. “I remember coming to these things, and thinking that everybody is a big professional, but we’re all people here too,” Teepole said. Seals said that communication skills are imperative for any college student. “The way you present yourself is very important,” he said. “Don’t be afraid to talk to an employer because they’re a person like you’re a person.” The job fairs for each sector (business, education and nursing) are held twice a year, once in the spring and once in the fall. The teacher job fair will be in Lord Conference Center from 2 to 3:30 p.m. on Tuesday, Oct. 19. Owens said that 20 school districts have signed up for the fair. However, as many as 60 school districts have come to the spring fair in the past because more schools are hiring in the spring. Another career services event coming up is the annual senior etiquette dinner held...

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BSM restructure encourages involvement
Sep28

BSM restructure encourages involvement

UMHB’s Baptist Student Ministries recently experienced a leadership restructuring that leaders hope will get more students involved in campus ministry opportunities and bring students closer to Christ. The BSM is now divided into nine emphases, according to BSM Director Shawn Shannon. The nine divisions are: Campus Outreach, Church Relations, Community Partnerships, Faith in Action, Freshmen Outreach, International Engagement, Promotions, Specialized Ministries, and Student Missions. One or two Lead Team members head each emphasis. Three Core Team leaders oversee the Lead Team members. Then, Dr. Shannon and Assistant Dir ector Karl Baker split the emphases that they oversee. Each emphasis has several ministries underneath it. For example, under the Specialized Ministries emphasis, students can be involved in Drama Ministry, Heart for the Nations, and Worship in the Quad. Underneath Community Partnerships, there is Raising Arrows, Hope for the Hungry and Children’s Ministry. Shannon said that the flexibility to add various ministries under each emphasis is an advantage. “We had a freshman student that arose that said, ‘I really want to work with senior adults.’ So, by two weeks later we have a group going out to Park Place,” Shannon said. “Since then, we’ve had two other students come to us with ministries that will fit well under Community Partnerships.” The Gathering, which is held every Tuesday evening at the BSM building at 7:30 p.m, was created as a part of this restructure, so that students can meet with the Lead Team members to learn more about each emphasis, and how they can get involved. “During the Gathering, we usually have a “big group” time, which is unique every week… After that, we break out into each ministry emphasis, and students are welcome to attend any breakout session that interests them,” said junior Christian studies major Bekah Gaff who serves as a lead team member of Promotions. Shannon likes the Gathering because students can visit with each emphasis to find out where their strengths will best be used and cultivated. “It’s kind of like going to Sam’s on Saturday; there’s samples, so you can check things out,” Shannon said. Baker said that the Gathering is an easy on-ramp to get involved with ministries immediately. “If you showed up next week [to the Gathering], then you could jump into any of our 9 emphases, and make a real contribution right away,” he said. “Previously, it took a little more time. You could go to a ministry and learn more about it, but you were localized to just that one experience. You weren’t really tapping into the whole picture of the BSM.” Shannon said that her goal for the BSM is to nurture...

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