At what point should euthanasia be the end?
Oct12

At what point should euthanasia be the end?

Published in the October 12, 2016 issue of The Bells Assisted suicide remains a heavily-debated topic throughout the world. Recently, a minor in Belgium chose this method to end his life. Belgium remains the most liberal country in the world when it comes to assisted suicide.  Patients can request physician-assisted suicide due to a terminal illness or a psychiatric condition. Now, almost five people a day die from physician-assisted suicide.  But assisted suicide is not a black and white issue. In the United States, five states allow doctor-assisted suicides including Oregon, Washington, Vermont, New Mexico, and Montana. Patients must be terminally ill (expected to live no more than six months), be of sound mind, and able to administer the pills on their own. What constitutes the word terminal? Many people live months, years, and sometimes decades after they are given only months to live. A person who is diagnosed with a terminal disease may decide to die even though they could live months or even years more. Life is a gift from God and once we open the door to assisted suicide we are opening the door to devaluing life—a life that was paid for by the pain and suffering of Christ. The question now becomes: at what point does life become not worth living? And I think the answer is never. God knew us before we were even born. Surely, with modern technology, there is a way to relieve a patient’s suffering without going to the point of suicide. I understand why patients who are terminally ill and in great affliction want to end their lives. And my heart cries out for them because of the pain they are experiencing.  However, according to Time Magazine, more people seek out assisted suicide because they worry about being a burden to their loved ones and friends. There should never be a point where a person feels like such a burden that they want to end their life. Movies such as the highly-popular summer chick flick, Me Before You, romanticize assisted suicide. In the movie, wealthy Will Traynor is planning on going through a physician-assisted suicide in the next six months because he is paralyzed. Louisa Clarke, his caregiver, decides to convince him to change his mind during this time and falls in love with him. But even though Will loves her too, he selfishly decides to go through with his physician-assisted death. This movie portrays the message that dying is better than living with a disability, which is troubling. A person can still have a fulfilling life while being disabled. Assisted suicide is a tough subject. Should patients be given...

Read More

UNDER THE RADAR: The best groups of UMHB you may not be watching

Published in the September 28, 2016 issue of The Bells JV FOOTBAL Fans scream, the smell of popcorn floats through the air, and sweat rolls down the players’ faces. One thing’s on their mind: getting the ball to the end zone. The Cru junior varsity football has gotten off to a great start to the season as they are currently 3-0. Next Monday, the Cru will take on Wayland Baptist University in Clyde, Texas. The JV football team consists of approximately 70 players, most of them being freshmen with several sophomores. “Our young guys do a great job coming out here and going through the same practice as the varsity guys do…But then they have their chance to shine and do their thing on Monday nights,” JV head football coach Keith Mullins said. Head Coach Mullins believes that being on the junior varsity prepares younger players for the intensity of varsity ball. “The JV team prepares a player for varsity by giving him playing experience in a game type setting,” Mullins said. JV football player sophomore Exercise Science major and mathematics minor Derek Sides’ love for the game motivates him to be a better player on and off the field. “I chose to play for the Cru for the love of the game,” Sides said.  “I have a passion for sports, mainly football. Football helps me grow physically, mentally, and spiritually.” Sides believes the team has great potential for the remainder of the season. “We have so much talent and teamwork. It is more of a family rather than a team. We have the potential to do something great.”   BLACK SHIRT CRU University staff knew the Crusader Marching Band needed a change when the 28-ensemble band remained stagnant for several years due to lack of interest and time, so six years ago the Blackshirt Cru Spirit Band was born. “Our primary purpose is to support our athletic teams on the field and the basketball area,” Blackshirt Cru Spirit Band Director Nils Landsberg said. “But our main purpose during the game is to basically be the soundtrack to what’s happening on the field.” Since its switch from marching band to spirit band, the band boasts 79 members of various majors and backgrounds. “One thing that is unique about the spirit band is that we’re the largest spirit student organization on campus. And there aren’t just music majors in there,” Landsberg said. “Having the opportunity to be in front of an ensemble that is made of some many walks of life and for some many different reasons but we all have the same of making music together is just awesome.”...

Read More
Have you found your church home?
Sep28

Have you found your church home?

Published in the Sept. 28, 2016 issue of The Bells A study conducted by the Barna group shows that approximately 40 percent of college students do not retain their faith during their college years. The university not only wants to cultivate a student’s education, but also their faith. University Chaplain, Dr. George Loutherback, believes that finding a church that fits one’s needs is essential for a college student. “A local church connection is very important for community, spiritual growth, and for feeling connected,” Loutherback said. “A local church offers opportunities for ministry investment, a chance to be with peers in a worship experience, [and] a chance to learn and be taught by someone who is gifted in the ability to teach.” For students searching for a church, Loutherback suggests talking with other students, visiting several churches in the area, and picking the one that the student enjoys attending the best. Churches of all different denominations can be found in the Belton/Temple/Killeen area, most of them offering college groups for local students. First United Methodist Church in Belton even offers a home-cooked lunch on Wednesdays for college students in exchange for a small donation. Students can enjoy fellowshipping with peers and church members during this time. For those who don’t have a transportation method or simply want to worship close to home, Everyday Disciples Church has weekly services on-campus in the Bell Baptist Association. “The Bell Baptist Association uses their building as a church plant incubator for free, so we are taking advantage of the space and opportunity to be on-campus,” Pastor Rich Diaz said. Outside of finding a church home, students can grow spiritually through service opportunities through the university’s Baptist Student Ministry. Some of the ministries led by the BSM include Drama Ministry, Hospital Ministry, Helping Hands, Hope for the Hungry, Random Acts of Kindness, and Worship in the Quad. Other ministries include Cru Catholics, Fellowship of Christian Athletes, and Small groups, an on-campus Bible study organized by Temple Bible Church. “I think it’s important to get involved in ministries in college because you need to figure out how to stay rooted in your faith,” said Children’s Ministry co-leader sophomore Spanish major Rosie Sawatzki. “When you’re away from home the first time it’s easy to get distracted by all the things in the world, and we need to set aside time to be reminded who we are to Him and in Him.” Sawatzki believes that through Children’s Ministry she’s able to live out Jesus’ teachings about loving her neighbors. “Being with the kids helps me realize that I’m working towards something with real meaning,” Sawatzki said. “I get...

Read More

The secret life of RD’s: The ins and outs of resident directors

Published in the September 14, 2016 issue of The Bells Most students know resident directors as the adult figures who enforce rules and make sure everyone is keeping their rooms spotless. But, Resident Directors are so much more than rule-keepers. “We manage the building, inform them of the rules, and try to make their [resident’s] experience as pleasant as possible,” Gettys Hall Resident Director Brian Street said. “I think it’s easy to view an RD as a law enforcer, but the conversations we get to have with the students are sometimes overlooked. I think our impact on the students is underestimated.” The university has a team of 13 resident directors who live on-site with the students to mentor them, answer questions, and ensure the overall health and safety of the students in their living quarters. College View Resident Director Rebeka Retta has spent almost 30 years as an RD at UMHB, including 25 years at Burt Hall and two-and-a-half years at College View. She has many memories of her residents and their exploits. “I’ve always thought I should write a book one day about just different things that happen in the resident halls and apartments… I could have a chapter on freshmen, a chapter on sophomores… because everybody does funny things.” Retta fondly recalls an incident with one of her RAs. While Retta was in Burt, one of her RAs made copies of the room check rules and slid the list under the residents’ doors. “When we got together after room check, I said, ‘How’d room checks go?’ and the one who’d slid the note goes, ‘mine went really good, but it was interesting when I went into the room, the papers were right there on the floor where I slid them.” “The next day she came to me and said, ‘I know why the papers are there. I took the sign down that was on the wall to make copies. Look at what the sign says.’ The sign said these are the rules, make sure you follow these rules, and do not remove this sign [from the wall]. When she made that copy, the girls looked down at the floor and they left that paper right there.” Street, who has been the resident director of Gettys for three years, enjoys the camaraderie shared between the male residents. “I think the funniest things are the pranks that the guys try to play on each other. The inside jokes are a lot of fun, especially when ping pong nicknames start.” But there are times when residents do not want to follow the rules, and according to 6-year Independence Village Resident Director...

Read More

Have you heard of BEN-HUR?

Published in the August 24 issue of The Bells Two brothers stand at the starting line, waiting to begin a chariot race of a lifetime. From the moment Ben-Hur begins, the audience is thrown into action. Ben-Hur is a remake of the 1959, Oscar-winning film. Several reviewers, including Rolling Stone and CNN, believe the new film doesn’t come close to comparing to the original epic. As I have never seen the original, I went into the film as an uninformed moviegoer without any standards to compare the film to. While I do not believe this film will be 2016’s Best Picture, I was thoroughly impressed. Ben-Hur tells the story of the Jewish prince, Judah Ben-Hur (Jack Huston), and his quest for vengeance against his Roman adopted brother, Messala (Tony Kebbell). Hur and Messala are devoted friends and brothers until Messala leaves Hur’s family to join the Roman army due to his insecurity over his birth family. A few years later, Messala returns to Jerusalem only to have Hur and his family arrested for treason against Rome. The film takes place during the period where Pontius Pilate (Pilou Asbaek) and his army were killing those who wanted freedom against Rome. Hur is sentenced to be a galley slave, while his mother and sister are supposedly jailed and crucified. Five years later, Hur finds himself back in Jerusalem thirsting for revenge. Huston plays a convincing Judah. The audience is able to mourn with him as he loses everything he has after being falsely accused by Messala. And the audience will find themselves cheering him on in the intense chariot race scene that will determine the fate of the two brothers. Love plays a huge role in this version of Ben-Hur, as well. Once Jesus teaches Judah about the importance of loving your neighbor, he is never the same. Judah’s story intermingles with the life of Christ. And the film portrays a biblically accurate depiction of Christ’s crucifixion that left more than one audience member with tears on their cheeks. Another notable appearance in the film is Morgan Freeman’s Ilderim who serves as Judah’s advisor/life coach/ trainer. Ilderim’s guidance saves Judah’s life more than once in the film. Ben-Hur combines biblical, fictional, and historical elements that when put together depict a moving tale of suffering and redemption. If you can sit through the two and a half hour film, Ben-Hur is a...

Read More