Faith important in path to healing from mental illness
Dec08

Faith important in path to healing from mental illness

People struggling with mental illnesses such as depression, bipolar disorder, OCD, and ADD may feel that having faith in God is hopeless. However, faith can play a huge role in overcoming these illnesses. The Cru Counseling Center encourages students to join a church, a local ministry or see a Christian therapist or counselor if they feel they are struggling through mental illness. Therapist, and UMHB almuna, Leslie L. Brown, MA, LPC intern, said it is important for people to discuss mental illness from a spiritual standpoint. She believes that through faith people can believe that they are battling mental illness for a reason and that one day they will no longer struggle with these illnesses. “Most importantly, those who have faith also have hope,” Brown said. “First they have hope that God is with them as they go through their battle with mental illness. Second they have hope that even if they struggle with their mental illness for the rest of their life, one day in Heaven they will be free of it. Third they have hope that their struggle has a purpose since God does not waste.” Brown wants people with mental illness to realize that medication and godly counsel are helpful tools in finding a cure for mental illness. “I believe in some cases the Bible and prayer alone are sufficient, but not in every case. Sometimes godly counsel is necessary,” she said. “I believe some medications are a gift from God, and I have seen medication lift a person’s mood just enough for counseling to be effective.” Senior pre-med biology major Kia Torres has seen firsthand the effects of faith on mental illness. Torres has struggled with depression and anxiety since she was diagnosed at the age of 10. Throughout Torres’ middle school and high school years, she struggled with suicide, drugs, partying, and various other vices. In Torres’ freshman year at UMHB, she attended church with her Cru leader. This church service changed her life forever. “The pastor was speaking on Psalms 139, and how you’re made for a purpose. I busted out crying, and I finally decided You’ve proven yourself to me.” Once Torres became a Christian, she underwent counseling where she learned that although someone may be a Christian, they can still have a mental illness. “I realized that depression is something I’m going to struggle with whether I’m a Christian or not,” Torres said. “You can be a strong, solid Christian and still have depression.” In Genesis, the Bible says that what Satan used for evil in Joseph’s story, God used for good to save many people’s lives. Torres has a tattoo...

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Homecoming week full of Cru traditions
Nov19

Homecoming week full of Cru traditions

ssert party, lemur kissing and a Crusader win. The 2015 University of Mary Hardin-Baylor homecoming week that took place Sunday. Nov. 8 through Saturday, Nov. 14, had a little something for everyone to enjoy. “Homecoming’s been fun. I was on the action committee which was interesting to be a part of. It was fun to help out with everything they needed. Set up, tear down; I was just there,” freshman nursing major Sammy Pilkington said. Throughout the week, the student organizations team gave away tanks and gift cards at various locations on campus. Some students even had to sing or answer questions to receive their prize. Students also participated in a weeklong event called The Hunt. Participants were asked to take pictures at various locations on and off campus to compete for the golden ticket. Winners of the golden ticket sat in a special balcony in Bawcom Student Union for the Cru’s game against East Texas Baptist University on Saturday. Shelby Halloran and Ryan Tyler-Coronado won the special prize. Another event, Clash of Classes, took place at the Recreation Courts on Tuesday at 9 p.m., where members from each class went head-to-head in a dodge ball competition. The sophomores took the victory. Students also took advantage of Relax and Unwind that took place on Thursday at 9 p.m. The university brought in food trucks for the first time, and Cue the Sun Band and Adam Fischer + Hunter Rea Band performed. Hot chocolate and s’mores were also available during the event. While students enjoyed refreshments, UMHB ATPE had university chaplain Dr. Loutherback kiss a lemur for Project Apple Tree. During the week, students voted with $1 tickets to choose which staff member would kiss the creature. Students could choose from Vice-President of Student Life, Dr. Byron Weathersbee, BSM Director, Dr. Shawn Shannon, or Director of Spititual Life, Dr. George Loutherback. Project Apple Tree raises money to buy school supplies for children in the Belton area. The lucky winner, was forced to put barbecue sauce on his lips before Mozzy, the lemur, kissed him. “It was unlike anything I’ve ever experienced,” Loutherback said. “The lemur was very aggressive, but it was fun. I’ve never done it before, so this is a first for me.” Stunt Night was also part of the homecoming festivites and took place on Thursday and Friday night at 7 p.m. Each class performed a ten minute skit based on the theme, vintage video games, which was chosen by the sophomore class. The freshman, who chose Pong as their game, told the story of a freshman girl, Claire, struggling between staying at UMHB or transferring to another...

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The Bell County Museum comes to life
Oct29

The Bell County Museum comes to life

atural History comes alive in the popular Night at the Museum film, the Bell County Museum came alive on Oct. 23. from 5 to 7 p.m. for parents and children of the Belton and Temple areas. The American Marketing Association hosted the event where more than 600 children and parents enjoyed activities. Members of the association dressed up as different characters, gave out candy, read stories, and helped with games. Participants walked into each room of the museum where they had the chance to interact with various historical figures from Bell County’s past. Each figure briefly explained who they were, and showed the children various artifacts from their story. Some of the historical figures that the children met included: Quannah Parker, a chuck wagon cook, Lewis Hines, an archeologist, and a ghost prisoner. Each figure stamped a passport for the children once they spoke to each one. If a child visited every character and received a certain number of stamps, they received candy. “There were a lot of families coming in. The kids looked like they were having a blast. It was a really good turnout,” sophomore marketing major and door greeter Sara Chivvis said. Children and parents could also have their picture taken at a photo booth, listen to the story of the Legend of Sleepy Hollow, visit the ghosts of various historical homes in the area, or participate in a craft. This year was the third consecutive year that the AMA has put on Night At the Museum at the Bell County Museum. “We were approached by the museum three years ago because they had the idea to do this Night At the Museum event, and they wanted to get help from an organization on campus. They came to us as the American Marketing Association and asked us to help them,” sophomore finance major and head planner of the event Skylar Kuretsch said. Although the event was loads of fun for the children and parents, it required a lot of planning. “I started meeting with the museum in August, and I’ve come almost every week to meet with them. It went really well tonight,” Kuretsch said. The AMA students enjoyed being able to get involved with the community through this event. “I just wanted to get to know more people and be a part of AMA,” said freshman marketing major Reagan Scafer who gave candy out at the event. “This seemed like a fun way to get to be a part of the community as well as an on-campus...

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Halloween DIY: Costume Edition
Oct29

Halloween DIY: Costume Edition

Who needs to buy one of those expensive, cheaply-made costumes from a big box store when you can make a DIY costume? As college students, we don’t have much money to spend on Halloween costumes. So, why not make one yourself from clothing articles you already have. Here are some helpful tips for making a costume that is sure to be a hit. Be inspired by your favorite TV shows and movies. Are you a Frozen fan? Then maybe you could dress up as Anna or Elsa. Or do you like Despicable me? Dress like a minion. It is easy and cute. Star Wars fan? Dress like Princess Leia or Darth Vader. For example, if you want to be Leia, find a white dress, make a grey utility belt using gray paper and a Sharpie, and role your hair in Leila’s signature side buns. Go to Walmart Walmart has plenty of character themed t-shirts like Batman or Superman that you could easily add pants or a skirt to creat a one-of-a-kind costume. Make sure you pick a costume you have time to make. It would be a shame to pick a costume that you do not have time to make depending on how close Halloween is. Find a few friends to help Don’t make your costume alone. Grab a few friends and make a night out of it. Look at what you have in your closet Sometimes you can make a costume with what you have already without having to purchase anything. One year I dressed up as Miss America. I used one of my old formal dresses, borrowed a fake crown from my little sister, made a sash from some ribbon lying around, and voila! It’s okay if you can’t sew There are many different ways to make a costume without knowing how to sew. You can even buy fabric glue from a craft store or Walmart at a minimal cost. Be modest You can have a cute costume without sacrificing your modesty. Making your own costume allows you to have control over how low your neckline is or the length of a skirt. Combine costume ideas If you can’t decide between two costumes, combine them. If you’re stuck between dressing up as Hannah Montana or a zombie, be Zombie Hannah Montana. Be Creative Don’t just go with the cookie-cutter costume that is the latest hit this year. Pick something you really want to be, and think outside of the...

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Group study sessions need a home
Oct14

Group study sessions need a home

Starting this semester, the Townsend Memorial Library has prohibited students from talking on the lower level of the library, creating a “no talking” zone throughout the library. In previous years, students were allowed to talk on the lower level for group sessions, while the upper level was reserved as a silent study area. Right now students are only allowed to talk in one small area of the lower level, and because the rest of the library is in absolute silence, this creates an awkward environment. Recently, I walked into the library with a friend to choose a book. I whispered a question to my friend, and I was told to be quiet. I realize that some people just sit and chat in the library and are a distraction, but others are legitimately in the library to study with their classmates. Cutting out talking almost eliminates group study sessions in the library. The whole purpose of group study sessions is to get together and discuss assignments. Groups cannot do research together without talking. It is virtually impossible. And if groups aren’t allowed to discuss their work, they can’t make use of the library resources. If the group is researching or studying a certain topic, various research materials are right at their fingertips. Students do not have to worry about combing through pages of internet data in their dorms, the resources are right there. Some people argue that individuals who want to study with absolute silence can’t concentrate with groups around them. However, those individuals have the whole upper level to study in. I realize that there are limited places for people to study in absolute silence. But, other places on campus do not have the resources the library does. The SUB was not built to be a study area. The area on the second floor is cramped and lacks table space. The second floor in Mabee is reserved for quiet study but it closes early, where as. the library remains open until 1 a.m. The first floor of Mabee gets loud during the day because people are constantly coming in and out checking their mail or visiting the police station. The library should get rid of the “no talking” rule, on the lower level which will benefit group study sessions, and give students the chance to access the library’s resources during later...

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