Homecoming: Camels/movies/PBJs/Stunt Night
Nov13

Homecoming: Camels/movies/PBJs/Stunt Night

A week of homecoming celebrations began Tuesday, Oct. 22 with a tank top giveaway and a Night of Lights event where students worshipped and lit candles. The next day, students were treated to PBJ sandwiches and a camel on King Street. On Tuesday night, students watched Disney Pixar’s “Incredibles 2” at Luther Memorial for Family Movie Night. Before the event, students sampled dishes from several local restaurants, including Pignetti’s, Dead Fish Grill, Raising Cane’s, Shipley’s Donuts, Jimmy John’s, and Jersey Mike’s Subs. Wednesday followed up with a campus-wide scavenger hunt. Thursday and Friday nights featured Stunt Night in Walton Chapel, which is a tradition that began in 1909 as a way to cure homesickness for students who couldn’t go home for the holidays. For Stunt Night, each class performed a skit based around the year’s theme, but they add in a UMHB twist. This year’s theme was Game night and focused on board games. The freshmen’s skit, based on Chutes and Ladders, showed the ups and downs of four students as they navigated through the school year. The sophomore class had Candyland, with four UMHB students getting sucked into the board game. They must take a journey to meet the king so they can find out how to get home. In the Junior class’ skit, the Clue Cru teamed up to find their kidnapped homecoming sponsor. In the seniors’ skit, Mr. Monopoly tries to steal all of UMHB’s prized artifacts. The Best Song and Dance went to the junior class. The Best Costume went to the sophomores. The Best Comedic Moment went to the junior class’ Hardin Simmons Cowboy, who was played by Nathan Vandolzer. He said it was different to play a HSU Cowboy. “I don’t have a country accent, but he does. Also, the overalls and boots are completely the opposite of me, but it was fun,” Vandolzer said. The Best Actor went to Kyle Parsons, who played the role of the director in the freshman class’ skit. Best Actress went to Gabby Shbeir, who played Miss White in the juniors’ skit. Parsons said he was humbled to win Best Actor. “I love acting. [I give] glory to God. It’s just a super fun experience,” Parsons said. Junior class won Stunt Night, and took home both the Campus Choice and Judges’ Choice awards. After Stunt Night on Thursday, students went to Rock Wall N’ Roll, where they climbed a rock wall, enjoyed music by Willow City, and dined on local cuisine from food trucks. Friday included the 2nd performance of Stunt Night, followed by a pep rally at Luther Memorial and a dessert party/carnival at the Alumni...

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Riveting reviews: Mystery books for fall
Nov13

Riveting reviews: Mystery books for fall

As the days get shorter and the weather cools down, it is the perfect time of year to settle down into an over-stuffed arm chair and pull out a good book. I’ve been a mystery book lover my entire life. I read every Nancy Drew and Hardy Boys book in the library at my elementary school. After that, I read the Boxcar Children mysteries, and then mysteries such as The Dollhouse Murders by Betty Wren Wright. Now, I’ve compiled a list of some of my favorite mystery books as an adult. “Predator” by Terri Blackstock What it’s about: Krista Carmichael’s 14-year-old sister is murdered by an online predator. Carmichael makes a fake online account on the social networking site GrapeVyne to bait the killer. When the killer makes Carmichael his next target, she must join forces with the creator of GrapeVyne, Ryan Adkins. Will Carmichael’s faith in God be restored? Will she be able to find the predator, or will she become the next victim? Why I recommend it: We live in a world where almost everyone has a social media account, most likely on multiple platforms. After I read this book, I updated my settings to make all of my social media accounts private. The story will keep you interested. Carmichael and Adkins are likeable characters, and I enjoyed seeing the development of Carmichael’s faith. “Thr3e” by Ted Dekker What it’s about: Seminary student Kevin Parson gets a chilling phone call from a man who calls himself Slater. Parson is given three minutes to confess his sin to the world or his car will blow up. He panics, finds a parking lot and vacates his car. Three minutes later, his car explodes. Slater continues to give Parson more riddles and more threats, each involving the number three. To find out Slater’s identity, Parson must confront his past head-on. Why I recommend it: This book has one of the best plot twists I’ve ever read. Normally, I have a hard time enjoying a Ted Dekker book, but I couldn’t put this one down. Dekker is considered a Christian writer, but his Christian themes are very subtle, and I really liked that about this book. The Restoration Series by Terri Blackstock (“Last Light”, “Night Light”, “True Light” and “Dawn’s Light”) What it’s about: Imagine what would happen if a plane fell out of the sky and your car suddenly stopped working. The electricity cuts out, and cell phones, computers and even radios are completely useless. The crisis is worldwide. During this crisis, the Branning family must decide whether to share their resources with their neighbors or hoard their possessions. Will...

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UMHB’s ROTC program trains future heroes
Nov13

UMHB’s ROTC program trains future heroes

This October marks the 10-year anniversary of the UMHB Army Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC). The program develops students into commissioned U.S. Army officers while they are earning their degree. “Once you graduate, you will commission as a second lieutenant, and then you will move up through the ranks and… given everything is done correctly, you should hit captain in about four or five years,” Capt. Charles Wilson, assistant professor of military science, said. UMHB’s program has approximately 30 cadets. They work in conjunction with Texas A&M Central Texas’ (TAMU-CT) ROTC program, which has approximately 50 cadets. ROTC offers scholarships to cadets. The two-, three- and four-year scholarships pay for tuition and provide a stipend for books. When a student accepts the scholarship, they must sign a contract that states they will finish ROTC to become commissioned officers. ROTC is divided into four segments: Military Science (MS) Level 1 (freshmen), 2 (sophomores), 3 (juniors), and 4 (seniors). MS Level 1 cadets learn rank structure, customs and courtesies such as saluting and standing at attention, and time management. MS Level 2 cadets learn how to function as a team, and they learn land navigation. MS Level 3 cadets learn how to manage large groups of personnel, while receiving guidance from the MS Level 4 cadets. They are put into more key leadership positions to display what they’ve learned during their time in ROTC. MS Level 4 cadets learn how to lead and manage on a higher level, and prepare to commission into the Army upon graduation. Students in the ROTC program can study any major. The classes are typically held on Mondays, Tuesdays, and Wednesdays. On Wednesdays, cadets participate in a lab portion of the program, where they will put what they’ve been learning into practice. Labs are usually done with the TAMU-CT cadets. ROTC Cadets have Physical Training (PT) Monday through Friday from 6 a.m. to 7 a.m. During PT, cadets do cardio exercises, weight lifting, and ruck marching with 35+ pounds. ROTC cadets do not have to go to basic training like enlisted soldiers. “These individuals are coming out as officers, so the information that they learn here is a condensed version of what they learn at basic training, but [cadets are] not learning how to follow; they’re learning how to be leaders,” Captain Wilson said. “They have to have the same core understanding of basic Army [doctrine] as privates, but leaving out of here they’re going to be officers at the end of the day, so this 21, 22-year-old female or male is going to be in charge of this 45-year-old sergeant that’s been in the military...

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Homecoming Photo Gallery
Nov06

Homecoming Photo Gallery

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Annual job fair gets an upgrade
Oct10

Annual job fair gets an upgrade

UMHB’s Career Services held the semi-annual Job and Internship Fair in the McLane Great Hall on the third floor of Bawcom Student Union on Tuesday, Oct. 2. Previously, this job fair has been in the Lord Conference Center located in Parker Academic Center, but it was moved to the McLane Great Hall this year. According to Career Services Director Don Owens, they decided to move the job fair because of the growing number of companies coming to the fair. “Traditionally, we would have maybe 28-36 employers, and it was pretty cramped,” Owens said. “All of a sudden we have 46-48 employers. With the parking, we were going to have to take up 48 parking spaces [by Parker Academic Center]… As we grow these, we plan for them to be in the Great Hall in Bawcom because we had a little more room.” Career Services switched from Cru Connection to Handshake over the summer. Handshake is an online job posting platform. Through this site, students can schedule appointments with the Career Center, make a customized profile, look for jobs, schedule interviews with possible employers, and look up upcoming events from Career Services. Career Services used Handshake for students to sign into the Job and Internship Fair with their student ID number. Upon signing in, students received name tags that included their name, major and degree. Students turned in their resumes early to the Career Services team, who in turn made a resume book that they gave to each recruiter upon arrival. Students spoke with representatives from various companies and groups including CGI, Fikes Company, the United States Marine Corps. Other companies that sent representatives include Edward Jones, several local CPA firms, Dell, McLane Company, the Austin Police Force, and others. According to Owens, approximately 139 students came to the career fair. He hopes that the job fair will grow every year with the number of employers and students attending. Owens believes that students shouldn’t wait until their junior or senior years to attend the job fair. “Traditionally, we don’t think it’s ever too early to start going to the job fair. A lot of those companies like to start tracking students early,” Owens said. “It’s good for students to practice knowing how to introduce themselves and getting a feel for how job fairs work.” He also said that recruiters are often impressed with UMHB students who attend the job fair. “We are continuously told by recruiters that our students are well prepared,” Owens said. Junior management major Michael Davis spoke to many of the companies at the job fair. “Right now I’m just keeping my eyes open to find what...

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