Coach ‘Fred’ inducted into Texas Sports Hall of Fame
Apr11

Coach ‘Fred’ inducted into Texas Sports Hall of Fame

Football Head Coach Pete ‘Fred’ Fredenburg was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame Saturday, April 7 in Waco, Texas. The University of Mary Hardin-Baylor head coach was inducted along with eight other well-known Texas athletes and coaches in the class of 2018. Coach Fredenburg was inducted along with former Texas A&M running back Johnny Bailey (deceased), former University of Texas basketball and volleyball player Nell Fortner, Texas A&M quarterback and Super Bowl winning Head Coach Gary Kubiak, Duncanville girls basketball coach Cathy Self-Morgan, former Texas Tech basketball coach and athletic director Gerald Myers, Olympic medalist and former University of Texas swimmer Jill Sterkel, Texas Ranger Michael Young, and University of Texas National Champion quarterback Vince Young. Coach Fredenburg started UMHB’s football program from the ground up 20 years ago in 1998. Since this time, Fredenburg has led the Cru to an overall record of 210-39, 15 American Southwest Conference titles and the 2016 NCAA Division III National Championship. Under Fredenburg’s leadership the Cru has played in the Alonzo Stagg Bowl for the national championship three times. He is a winner of the Liberty Mutual Division III Coach of the Year (2014) award and the American Football Coaches Association Division III National Coach of the Year (2016) award. In the press conference, Fredenburg stated that when he came to UMHB, the football program didn’t have any equipment, coaches, or even a field. “I made a plan to try to get within a 75-mile radius of Belton to tell our story,” Coach Fred said. “We felt like that 100 guys would be a break even for the program. We had 217 guys show up that first year.” Jerrell Freeman, former Chicago Bear linebacker and UMHB alumnus played underneath Coach Fredenburg’s leadership from 2004-08. Freeman attended of the induction ceremony for the famers. “It’s been a long time coming,” Freeman said. “He’s an old school coach, so you know exactly what you’re getting from him. He’s built a really great program. He’s tough, but he knows what it takes to win.” Fredenburg also has ties with two of the other inductees, Nell Fortner and Gerald Myers. Fredenburg’s wife, Karen, used to coach Fortner and would sometimes have her husband come to basketball practice to guard Fortner. Also, Fredenburg briefly attended Monterrey High School in Lubbock, where Myers coached. Myers approached Fredenburg about playing basketball for the team. “He was a good athlete, and I was looking forward to coaching. But then his family moved. If he had stayed in Monterrey, he might have gotten a basketball scholarship [for college],” Myers said. During Fredenburg’s acceptance speech, he discussed living in the...

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The Old Maid and The Thief: An uncomfortable situation that “dominoes”
Apr11

The Old Maid and The Thief: An uncomfortable situation that “dominoes”

UMHB music professors George and Penny Hogan are once again to conduct the theatre’s newest opera, The Lady and the Thief. This is the first opera to be performed in the new Sue & Frank Mayborn Performing Art Center on Friday, April 13 at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday at 2:30 p.m. Alumni will also be performing in this year’s show. The Lady and the Thief is a one-act grotesque, radio opera that takes place in 1939. NBC Radio commissioned Gian Carlo Menotti to write this opera for their radio program. Professor George Hogan said there’s a lot to learn from the opera. “This [opera] is situationally grotesque,” George Hogan said. “There’s life lessons you can take away. We’re looking at the human condition in this. It’s basically grotesque hospitality.” Hogan describes the plot of the opera and how situational hospitality plays a part in it. Hogan said that there is an old spinster, Miss Todd, who has a younger maid. There’s also a town gossip named Miss Pinkerton, who comes over one night to talk about the new minister. Hogan said that they’re having tea, there’s a knock at the door and a man who’s drenched from the storm outside. Hogan said the first grotesque hospitality occurs when the two women do what nobody in their right mind would do- invite the strange man into the house. He said the situation dominoes from there with one uncomfortable decision after another. The Hogans are trying something new with this Opera since it was originally on the radio before it was ever performed live. “We’re going to have a foley artist (someone who creates all the sounds on the radio),” George Hogan said. “We’re setting up the pit to be the NBC radio studio… then we’re running two scrims, which is like a veil.” George Hogan said that while the singers are in the pit, the actors will be up on stage. The Hogans said that the actors are supposed to be a part of your imagination as you listen to a radio program. “It’s been really exciting to see this unfold, because it’s a new way to present this,” Penny Hogan said. George Hogan hopes that the opera provides more than just entertainment. “I hope it’s thought-provoking like a sermon would be.” George Hogan says that it’s been different being in the PAC this year instead of at the Cultural Activities Center in Temple. “This has been a learning curve, but there’s been some really wonderful blessings… We’re excited about being in our new building. It’s kind of a freshman year for all of us.” The performances will be tonight...

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The real meaning behind charity
Apr11

The real meaning behind charity

It’s 2018. Why is poverty still a major challenge? Why are third world countries still struggling? Every year, kind-hearted people box up old clothes and donate money to send to these countries, but we’re not seeing results. Poverty, Inc., a documentary by Michael Miller and Mark Weber that has received 30 film festival honors and won 11 awards, attempts to address this problem. According to the documentary, the reason we are not seeing results is, because emergency disaster relief has become a permanent model. The documentary suggests that it might be time to stop sending clothes, money and shoes to third world countries. According to Huffington Post, the East African Community made up of Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania, Burandi, and Rwanda, have proposed to ban all imported used clothing by 2019. According to the same article, (Goldberg, 2016), the clothes that are being donated are being resold for extremely low prices such as in the Gikomba Market, located in East Africa. The article said that jeans can retail for as low as $1.50 at the market, which is between five to 10 percent of a new clothing item made in Kenya. Movie stars, presidents, pastors, non-profit institutions, and just regular people push to send more items to developing countries. But it may not encourage new economies if goods are handed over for free. It was pointed out in the Poverty, Inc. film that these countries don’t need fish handed to them; they need to be taught how to grow a fish economy. I agree. We can’t keep treating these countries like they are in a permanent state of disaster. They shouldn’t be treated as the beggars under the global table, when they deserve a seat at the table. These countries are rich in natural resources that can make a profit. Africa holds approximately 30 percent of the world’s natural resources. It is rich with diamonds, gold, nickel, titanium, oil and gas (Aljazeera.com). Haiti’s natural resources include bauxite, copper, calcium, carbonite, gold and marble (Haitigeo). As a society, we need to rediscover the true meaning of charity. Charity isn’t only about writing checks or sending over a box of used clothing to Africa or Haiti. According to Weber, co-filmmaker of Poverty, Inc., the Latin root word of charity is “caritas,” meaning love. 1 Corinthians states: “And now these three remain: faith, hope and love, but the greatest of these is love.” We must stop letting those we help become faceless and nameless. Real love is more than writing a check. Real love is about getting more involved than just a one-time visit. We really should look at how to love others...

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Accounting students volunteer to help locals with their taxes
Mar07

Accounting students volunteer to help locals with their taxes

Accounting students of the McLane College of Business are helping Central Texas citizens by working with United Way of Central Texas through the Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Program (VITA). The students are gaining experience and helping people get their tax forms in to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) to receive their tax return refunds or pay what they owe before Tuesday, April 17 (Tax Day). With VITA, Central Texas residents come to various locations in Temple, Belton, Killeen and Harker Heights to have their taxes prepared and e-filed for free. VITA is set up to help clients with an income of $50,000 or less, persons with disabilities, the elderly, and taxpayers with limited English. Last year, VITA filed 844 returns in 2017, but according to United Way Director of Public Relations Veshell Greene, they would like to file 1,000 returns this year. “VITA is hope,” Greene said. “The fact that these people can come get their taxes done at no charge… that’s more money they can spend in their home and on their kids. Greene stressed that VITA is a reputable program, and that volunteers must go through training with the IRS before filling out returns. The sites also have reviewers with advanced certification to validate every return before filing. “All the volunteers have to be certified by the IRS. It’s not just someone doing the returns in a garage,” Greene said. The tax filing process takes about an hour. Clients are required to fill out an intake form with questions about their financial background for 2017. They must bring their social security card or an equivalent and a picture ID. After filling out an intake form, the client will meet with a volunteer to go over the form and answer any clarifications the client might have. The volunteer will input the client’s financial information from their W-2 and any other forms the client brings in. The clients can see how much they will be getting back as soon as their information is plugged into the site. Then, the client will sit with a reviewer to go back through the return. Volunteers in the program include not only UMHB students, but also Temple High School students, community members, and United Way staff. Associate Dean Dr. Kirk Fischer teaches Federal Income Tax students, and he has encouraged them to volunteer with the program. Dr. Fischer also serves as a site coordinator in Belton for VITA. “This year we have over 45 volunteers with the VITA program because we have branched out with the pilot program at Temple High School,” Greene said. Senior accounting and management major Noe Diaz started volunteering...

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Caleb Fitzwater dubbed Mr. Crusader Knight
Mar07

Caleb Fitzwater dubbed Mr. Crusader Knight

Junior Caleb Fitzwater, representing McLane Hall, won the title of Mr. Crusader Knights on Saturday, Feb. 25. “It was definitely shocking,” Fitzwater said of his win. “I’ve never been given so many hugs in one night, which is kind of cool.” The show featured many funny moments, along with several surprises, including a green screen that the contestants used during a group dance. Junior Isaac Felan directed Crusader Knights along with assistant directors junior Daniel Martinez, senior Tori Bradbery and senior Ben Roark. “I worked with contestants, I worked with ticket sales and ushers, and I did anything I was asked to do,” Martinez said. “My role was to help the guys feel comfortable with the show, while offering input on the production.” Martinez said that he was proud of all the hard work that the men have put in since they began practicing and it showed on the night of the competition. “The show was amazing, and the guys brought it,” he said. “The introductions, the spotlights, the videos, the top six answers… all of it was amazing and hilarious. I am proud of these men for rising up and owning the stage.” This year, as part of the theme, it was announced that NBC liked Crusader Knights 2017 so much that they decided to film the 2018 Crusader Knights competition before a live studio audience. Ellie Ball hosted the competition, while Aria Flores, Anthony Tharp, Jenna Forester, and Chris Box emceed. The night began with the contestant videos. Each contestant prepared a one-minute video before the competition to be projected on the screens. The contestants picked TV shows to base their videos off of. Some featured TV shows included The Andy Griffith Show, I Love Lucy, Happy Days, The Office, Even Stevens, and more. Following each video, the contestants were given pre-determined questions, which they had to act out. The competition also included several group dances. The top six finalists for Cru Knights included Mr. Phi Mu Alpha James Jones, Mr. Farris Hall Jacob Hindman, Mr. McLane Hall Caleb Fitzwater, Mr. Junior Class Chase Mariott, Mr. Sophomore Class Patrick McElyea , and Mr. Burt Hall Peter Zuniga. The six finalists were required to answer two finalists’ questions read by 2018 Miss Mary Hardin-Baylor Tori Pharris before the judges made their final decision. The competition also included several individual awards. Senior marketing major Vincent Sigler, representing University Ambassadors, won Best Spotlight. Best Video went to Freshman biology major Steve Villalobos, who represented First Year Council. Sophomore marketing major Christian McConnell, representing Independence Village, took home Best Interview, and Freshman mathematics major Andrew Berg won the Timothy Award, which...

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