Cleaning up the damage: Hurricane Harvey sweeps through 54 Texas counties, 70 dead
Sep18

Cleaning up the damage: Hurricane Harvey sweeps through 54 Texas counties, 70 dead

The long clean-up process continues for those affected by Category 4 Hurricane Harvey after it hit the Texas shore four miles east of Rockport with winds reaching up to 130 miles, on Friday, Aug. 25, at 9:45 p.m. It retreated only to return and hit land once again at midnight as a Category 3, at the northeastern shore of Copano Bay. Hurricane Harvey brought record amounts of rain to other areas, dumping more water than Hurricane Katrina, Sandy and Andrew combined. Over 50 inches of rain accumulated in the state of Texas, and Governor Greg Abbott declared a state of disaster in 54 counties (gov.Te xas.gov). Many people found themselves stranded on the roofs of their homes, and had to be rescued by boat. The death toll for Harvey has reached at least 70, and now Hurricane Irma has added to the nation’s death toll, as at least 15 have died in Florida. Senior public relations major Lynsey May, who is from Kingwood, Texas, said that her family was forced to evacuate due to the rising waters. Although the waters have now receded, when we spoke with May last Monday, water levels in her home were still rising. “The water has reached the inside of my house that is seven feet off the ground,” she said. “It has affected my family’s business and forced us not only to evacuate ourselves but our 29 horses as well.” May worried that her home would not be there when the waters finally receded. “We laid every brick of our barn. We danced on the floors of our house when we were building it. The memories will always be there, but the actual place that I call home might not be there.” Senior public relations major Paige Mareth, who is from Victoria, Texas, said that her parents chose to remain at her childhood home and weather the storm. “They’re without water and electricity and it may be that way for a while,” she said on Monday, Aug. 28. Mareth said that although it’s been an emotional week, she is thankful that her home sustained minimal damage. “Not everyone else in my little city was as fortunate, and that’s hard to know,” she said. Evacuees began arriving in Bell County from Brazoria County early Monday, Aug. 28. They were first transported to the Expo Center, where they were given dry clothes and shoes, and then taken to shelters that had been set up around Bell County. Vista Community Church took over the process of receiving donations. Volunteer Coordinator for Bell County, Lacey Dove, said that it was truly humbling to see the evacuees arriving...

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Beloved Miller Springs closes
Sep14

Beloved Miller Springs closes

Miller Springs Nature Center, east of Lake Belton, closed down in August. The center, which opened in October 1993, was a popular place for Central Texas hikers, fishers, bikers and nature lovers. The 260-acre land preservation, complete with hiking trails and various wildlife, was run by Miller Springs Alliance, a non-profit volunteer group. In 1993, the center took out a lease with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Since that time, the Alliance volunteers maintained the trails for the Center for Central Texas visitors to enjoy. The Alliance announced the closure of the park on Facebook, stating that due to lack of funding, they were ending their 24-year lease with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, and giving the land back to the Corps. “We appreciate all the support received through the years from volunteer projects, and we hate to see them end,” the center volunteers stated in their Facebook post. “Thank you for enjoying the Nature Center. It is a unique place in Central Texas, and we are saddened to see the gate closed.” Members of the community upset by the center’s closure are rallying together against the park closure with a Facebook group, Save Miller Springs Nature Center. As of this printing, more than 6,800 people have signed a petition on change.org for the park to reopen. Vanessa Duke, a Belton High School alumna from Killeen, started the petition. “I wanted to gather firm evidence of community support [that the park stays open] if it ever came into question.” Miller Springs has a special place in Duke’s heart because she frequented the park during her senior year of high school. “It’s a place right in our own backyard where we can enjoy the great outdoors and connect with nature.” Duke said that she’s tried reaching out to the city, but has not heard back yet. “Much of the city’s efforts have been concentrated towards Harvey relief, rightfully so,” she said. “As a result it’s been slow going.” Senior criminal justice major Chase McGhee was one of the signers of the petition. McGhe said he signed the petition because he frequently hikes and fishes at Miller Springs. “I shared the petition and had everyone I know sign it,” McGhee said. “Now that I go to UMHB, it is one of the few close hiking spots that we have.” McGhee said that he enjoyed going to the park because of the different features the park has to offer. “Miller Springs has a very diverse hiking experience,” he said. “There’s so many different sceneries as well: gravel creeks, a few caves, and rock cliffs that are great if you like rock...

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Harvey affects UMHB community
Aug31

Harvey affects UMHB community

A prayer vigil was held for students and faculty affected by Hurricane Harvey this last Tuesday evening at Luther Memorial on the UMHB campus in Belton. The university and local community of Belton and Bell County have been affected by Hurricane Harvey after it hit the Texas shore four miles east of Rockport as a category 4 hurricane with winds reaching up to 130 miles, on Friday, August 25, at 9:45 p.m. It retreated only to return and hit land once again that midnight as a category 3, at the northeastern shore of Copano Bay. Harvey brought record amounts of rain to other areas, dumping more water than Hurricane Katrina, Sandy, and Andrew combined. Over 50 inches of rain has been dumped on the state of Texas, and Governor Greg Abbott declared 54 counties as a state of disaster. Many people found themselves stranded on the roofs of their homes, and had to be rescued by boat. Hurricane Harvey, currently classified as a tropical depression, is expected to drift to the Gulf of Mexico before moving northeast towards Louisiana and Arkansas by Sat., Sept. 2. Senior public relations major Lynsey May, who is from Kingwood, TX, said that her family was forced to evacuate due to the rising waters. Although the waters have begun to recede, when we spoke with May on Monday, water levels in her home were still rising. “The water has reached the inside of my house that is seven feet off the ground,” she said. “It has affected my family’s business and forced us to not only evacuate ourselves but our 29 horses, as well.” May worries that her home may not be there when the waters finally recede. “We laid every brick of our barn. We nailed every screw in. We danced on the floors of our house when we were building it. The memories will always be there, but the actual place that I call home might not be there.” Senior public relations major Paige Mareth, who is from Victoria, TX, said that her parents chose to remain at her childhood home and weather the storm. “They’re without water and electricity and it may be that way for a while,” she said. Mareth said that although it’s been an emotional week, she is thankful that her home sustained minimal damage. “Not everyone else in my little city was as fortunate, and that’s hard to know,” she said. Hurricane Harvey evacuees began arriving from Brazoria County to Bell County early Monday morning. They were first transported to the Expo Center, where they were given dry clothes and shoes, and then they were taken to shelters...

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Letter from the Editor
Aug23

Letter from the Editor

“What did you do this summer?” This was a popular essay topic we were tasked to answer in our years in leading up to college. And although we are no longer asked to fill up a spiral with adventures at water parks and campgrounds, comparing summer vacations is still popular among students. As editor of The Bells, I have a medium in which to share my summer happenings. So here’s a taste of what I experienced. During the last week of June, I took a road trip to Colorado and Wyoming with my two sisters, my parents and my grandmother. We stopped in Colorado Springs to visit my aunt and uncle, where we also visited the Garden of the Gods. We took plenty of Instagram-worthy pictures of the red rock formations that rise up from the ground. Being the sentimentalist that I am, I convinced everyone to scour the park for a certain rock formation that we’d stood in front of six years prior to recreate a family-loved photo. From there, we headed to Grand Tetons National Park. Once we left Jackson Hole, Wyoming, we no longer had cell phone service antil we traveled back through three days later. As soon as we drove into the park, we passed signs warning us of nearby bears, which had us all pressing our noses to the car window in search of a black bear. During our first morning in the Grand Tetons, I convinced my family to rent kayaks. I took a single, and everyone else rode in tandem. We were given a map of the area and told to return in two hours. Getting out on the water, feeling the cold wind flood through my jacket and being surrounded by the majestic mountains created an exhilarating experience. An hour into kayaking, we knew that trouble was approaching in the form of dark storm clouds. From there, it was a race against time to get back to the marina before the storm hit. Once we safely got back to the marina, we drove into Yellowstone National Park. We got to see Old Faithful, a geyser known for shooting out water high into the air every hour-and-a-half. Once I returned from Wyoming, I boarded a plane with my 17-year-old sister, Haley, to Anchorage, Alaska for a mission trip. I will never be the same after this trip. We started our trip out with a glacier tour. Then, we had the privilege of visiting four churches in the area, where we helped knock on doors, distribute door hangers, pray with people, sing and preach atrevival services, and assist with electrical work. One of...

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Tips for seniors looking for dream job
Apr26

Tips for seniors looking for dream job

Published in the April 26, 2017 issue of The Bells Graduation is only two short weeks away. The invitations have been sent out, senior pictures have been taken and caps have been decorated. So, what’s next after the long and highly anticipated day most seniors work four years (or sometimes longer) to reach? For most seniors, unless they’re headed to graduate school, it’s time to look for a job. While this may seem like a daunting task, Director of Career Services Don Owens, has several helpful tips for seniors to get that dream job. 1. Present yourself in every application process in a professional way. Owens stresses that job applicants should fill out every line on a job application even if the student doesn’t have an exact answer. Not applicable is better than a blank line. 2 Be sure your resume is targeted to that particular job. Owens suggests reviewing the company’s website, and to be sure and include keywords from the job description into your resume. “Most applications are online. [Companies] have systems that will scan resumes, and you get points for every word you have in your resume that’s in the job description.” 3. Do not undersell yourself. “Go back and look at the job you’re applying for, and look at courses you’ve taken. Look at assignments you’ve had to research and think about the steps you used to do those,” said. Owens. He says to highlight the activities that students have done in the past and not to immediately confess what you don’t have. Promote what you do have. 4. Take advantage of Career Services. “We feel like we’re the best kept secret of campus.” Career Services offers many tools for students looking for a job. They conduct mock interviews for students to prepare for real interviews. A student may also email or bring their resume in person so a Career Services representative can look at it. Owens said students should also check out the Cru Connection tool on the Career Services website. It gives alumni a chance to peruse open job...

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