Stadium brings energy to flag football
Nov06

Stadium brings energy to flag football

Crusader Stadium has already proved itself to be a great venue to watch football, but many students didn’t ever think they would have the opportunity to play under the lights at the new facility. However, the intramural flag football championship games were moved from their normal location at the recreational fields to the stadium. “Playing intramurals in the new stadium was awesome. It’s great that they’re finding ways for the whole university to enjoy it. The campus rec staff went all out by introducing the team members, having the national anthem, giving stuff away for free and using the scoreboard during our games,” senior business major Adam Rea said. The idea for moving the championship games to a bigger field where more people could enjoy the games has been on the Student Government Association’s agenda for a number of years. “I think Jonathan Kendall with SGA and Campus Rec tried this in years past with intramural basketball championships being held in the arena. It was never an option for flag football before now,” Director of Campus Recreation Sue Weaver said. The overall atmosphere of the championship games was  one that is usually not felt with intramural games. Playing on such a  stage gave the players a feel of what it would be like to compete in a big game at Crusader Stadium. “The event was absolutely a success. It was a great opportunity for those participating in the games to be recognized and to play in such a great facility. Fans and parents came to watch, and our Campus Rec staff, SGA, and other organizations were recognized,” Weaver said. The hype that was brought to the night gave the team competing and the fans that were there a lot to look forward to. “It was very cool to get to play in Crusader Stadium,” senior business major Tyson Brower said. “We have been playing together all year as a team … and we all really enjoyed the championship games. It gave a different feel to intramurals.” The games were  full of   both big plays and excitement, but the coed championship had the teams and fans biting their fingernails till the last second ran off the jumbotron. “Unfortunately, our coed team came up short, but we had a great time playing together all season, and I made a lot of new friends through intramurals,” Brower said. That One Team was the squad that secured the victory for the coed side of things, while the Dream Killers won the men’s division.  Both teams were awarded T-shirts as well as bragging rights until next year. “Winning intramurals is all about getting the...

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Basketball begins preparation for season
Nov05

Basketball begins preparation for season

The Crusader men’s basketball team started practice two weeks ago, and players have their eyes set on another national championship run. Although winning it all is their ultimate goal, they understand that the work they put in as a team right now is what is most important. “This is the time of the year that is good for the coach and not good for the players,” Head Coach Ken DeWeese said, “Players hate it because there aren’t any games to prepare for, and coaches can just go and go and go. This is the time of the year that you just have to get through and remember it’s the most important learning time.” Nine new faces will join the Cru’s squad this year, but one thing that will remain constant is the hard work that propelled the team to such a successful season last year. The newcomers have quickly learned what UMHB basketball is all about. “The new guys are catching on quickly, and they are retaining it,” DeWeese said. “The important thing is they don’t just listen and get it done that day. They have been good about taking it from one day to the next.” The players are excited about getting back on the court and showing what they have improved on during the offseason. “I have worked on a ton of things over the offseason and summer to step up my game. One thing in particular would be to shoot more,” sophomore point guard Layton Zinsmeister said. The Cru added height to their roster over the summer, which should prove to be to their advantage throughout the season. The men are currently ranked seventh in the preseason national rankings, with eight returners from the national championship game last year. “Every team has a different personality. There are no similarities from last year to this year. Even though we have a number of guys back, there is no similarity,” DeWeese said. Zinsmeister agrees that the makeup of this roster has completely changed. “This team is different from last year’s team because of size advantage. Last year we were pretty small and would run. This year we have more size with some new guys, but our best offense is still getting out and running.” The Crusaders scrimmaged Texas Lutheran University Nov. 2 and played very well with the returners and newcomers contributing to the game. “We played hard and there were good things throughout the game, but it definitely gave us a look at what we need to work on,” senior forward Kitrick Bell said. Losing three seniors last year, there are leadership roles needing to be filled,...

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Fantasy Football Players Revamping Lineups

The industry of fantasy football has furthered the love and obsession of NFL enthusiasts for many people across the country. Television shows and magazines come out weekly telling these  virtual “owners” what moves should and should not be made. Numerous students at UMHB have joined the craze as well and have found themselves glued to the TV on Sundays just to make sure their weekly changes have paid off for them.  Leagues are usually made up of anywhere from eight to 12 teams, and the season starts by holding a draft. Owners will go through and pick any player they want from any team that they feel will do the best statistically throughout the season. Each team must have a player at every offensive position except the offensive line. Owners must also pick a defense and a kicker. The scoring of each league differs. More than likely, people on the UMHB campus are adjusting their lineups for their teams right now. “I am constantly checking my fantasy app. There are always injuries and breakout players, so if there are moves that need to be made, I want to be ahead of the game,” junior physical therapy major Jeremy Corbin said. He isn’t the only one who keeps up with the latest happenings in the world of fantasy football. “I check up on it at least three times a week,” junior exercise sport science major Daniel Villarreal said.  “I make roster changes to add a new kicker every week. Mostly I just pick up who is supposed to have the highest total of points and trade out whoever I had.” Some decisions are easier than others when it comes to editing lineups. “My biggest debate is always the quarterback position, and I don’t make a final decision usually until Sunday mornings since my current quarterback, Cam Newton, has been so off and on,” Villarreal said The most common statement made by people who participate in fantasy football is that it has made them pay attention to  games they used to never even think twice about keeping up with. “I watch a lot more games I really don’t care about if I have guys playing in that game,” Villarreal said. Fantasy football can cause a lot of heartache and also a lot of joy if your team is doing well. Those who have Peyton Manning on their roster are probably happy with their record right now since he is averaging around 22 points a week. Another student on campus who is happy with his team  is junior business major Donavan Catron. “My team is doing really good. My main players that...

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‘Carrie’ Brings Horror, Gore to Cinema
Oct22

‘Carrie’ Brings Horror, Gore to Cinema

The remake of Carrie is the closest version of any movie that has been based on the novel by Stephen King. It tells the story of a troubled teenager, played by Chloe Grace Moretz, who is harassed and tormented by her classmates throughout her childhood. When the popular clique in school takes it too far and posts an embarrassing video of her in the showers after gym class, Carrie’s life turns upside down. Her social life is miserable, and her home life isn’t any better. Her overly religious mother, played by Julianne Moore, is constantly telling her daughter she is sinful and locks her in the closet for hours on end so the teen can pray for repentance. Moore is the perfect fit for the character of Margaret White; she leaves the viewer wondering just what she has up her sleeve next. Kimberly Pierce, director of the movie, does an excellent job in the remake of Carrie to incorporate current technology and issues in the story line. She also lets t he viewer really get to know Carrie White and creates sympathy for her miserable character. In the trailer and previews, the movie looks as though it will be a horror film with a lot of twists and turns, but in reality, it isn’t all that scary. But  the way the mother carries herself and her over-the-top beliefs will give you chills. In the movie, Carrie is constantly teased until she is finally pushed over the edge at the junior-senior prom and is forced to retreat to her secret powers, which she discovers early in the film. The same people who posted the   embarrassing video of her make it a point to ruin her perfect night out at the prom. All the people that made going to school every day a struggle for Carrie ultimately pay for it in the end. It is worth the $7 to watch this movie, which offers the viewer an underlying theme, that you can only push people so far until they break. And the quietest, m ost vulnerable-looking people could be capable of the most powerful acts. By the end of the movie, it’s hard to distinguish just who is the victim and who is the villain, and this is well played by director Pierce. The only thing that might turn moviegoers away from this film is the fact that it is  very bloody. But this aspect doesn’t take away from the overall feel of the movie. It only enhances it. Carrie probably won’t be a box office hit, but it definitely won’t be a...

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Celebrities use influence for positive change
Oct09

Celebrities use influence for positive change

All too often we see  celebrities in the limelight doing things that  shouldn’t even be covered in the media, yet they are glorified simply because they are famous. What is often forgotten are the celebrities who are working hard to make a difference and do something positive with the platform they have been blessed with. For example, former NFL quarterback Tim Tebow has continued to be the same guy throughout his success and his failure. Isn’t this what it is all about? Famous athletes are in the public eye as much as anyone, and it has shown time after time that they can get caught up in themselves and forever ruin the  opportunity of positively influencing others. But Tebow has never faltered from his stance on being a man of God. He is a former Heisman Trophy winner, but his positive influence on others is not covered nearly as much as current Heisman, Johnny Manziel. When Tebow formed a genuine friendship with a young boy struggling with cancer, the media covered it, but not as long as the media covered Manziel’s sudden exit from the Manning Passing Camp. What this says is public attention focuses on the negative much more than  the positive. This is evident because countless numbers of celebrities are doing good works that ultimately go unnoticed. Many people see these celebrities giving to charities, and just think of it as something they are doing for a write-off on their taxes. This may be true in some cases, but in reality, the majority of these actors, musicians, or professional athletes are genuine in their giving and create relationships with the people they are helping. For instance, Angelina Jolie has been involved in charity work for years, and her acts of kindness seem like they are legit. Since 2001, she has not only sent funds and necessities in war-torn countries but  has visited more than 20 of these countries. Recently Jolie donated $1 million to Doctors without Borders, who give aid to countries that are in severe poverty or are in the midst of wars or natural disasters. It may seem easy for these celebrities to make a difference because of all the money they have. Money  doesn’t fix everything. It is the relationships within the charity that really stand out. Super Bowl winning quarterback Drew Brees from  New Orleans realized he needed to make a difference when he arrived in the destroyed city after Hurricane Katrina. Brees didn’t just give money to help rebuild playgrounds and child care centers that were washed away. He actually got out there and worked side by side with the locals. These stories of...

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