5-K Cru for a Cause: Race against human trafficking

Human trafficking is a serious global issue  most people do not like to think happens in the U.S., especially in Texas. In hopes of fighting these inhumane transactions, the resident assistants at Beall joined with Freedom Youth Project of San Antonio to raise money to help these trafficking victims through a 5-K race April 14. Every year, the Beall RAs vote on several causes to raise awareness for through a 5-K run called Cru for a Cause.Last year, cancer was the chosen one, but human trafficking prevailed this year. “I feel strongly about this cause because a lot of people think of it as a foreign issue. No one knows it’s right next door,” Resident Director Christan Hammonds said. “There have even been girls rescued from Killeen, and it keeps growing.” All of the university was invited to participate, and even a Kid-K was held after the main race. One hundred percent of the proceeds went to the Freedom Youth Project in San Antonio. Placing second in the race was junior exercise and sport science major Aaron Miller. He likes the races because they are local and  he can run with his friends. He tries to participate every year except last year due to an injury. “I’ve always made it a point to race in the on-campus races to be a part of the school,” Miller said. “I don’t want to do it just so I can go fast. I want to do it for the right reasons.” The race began at Mayborn, wrapped throughout the campus to the overpass bridge then ended back at Mayborn. Bounce  houses, face painting, bake sales, a silent auction and donation booths were present to help raise money for the cause. “I would always love for there to be more, but it was a good turnout, and there were a lot of people cheering them on,” Hammonds said. The 5-K event along with the booth’s donations raised a total of $3,000. There were 78 running participants for the 5-K and about 10 for the Kid-K. Finishing in tenth place was sophomore pre-physical therapy major Zack Bailey. “It was a great feeling knowing that we were running for a good cause,” Bailey said. In the United States, there are 15,000 to 18,000 international victims per year who are smuggled or transported within the U.S. to be used in either forced labor or sex slavery. Human trafficking is a lot closer to home than most people would like to believe. With American-born 12 to 14 -year-old girls being high in demand, it is horrible to fathom that Texas is responsible for more than 20 percent...

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Baseball continues to work toward postseason play
Mar06

Baseball continues to work toward postseason play

Throwing the first no-hitter for UMHB since 1992 and D III’s first no-hitter of the season, senior accounting major Taylor Burrow was named ASC West Division’s Pitcher of the Week. He managed to strike out 10 of Southwestern University’s players, walk three and only allowed them one run. “It was a pretty surreal experience, a feat that is tough to do at this level or any level at that,” Burrow said. “But it was a big accomplishment as a team because we had to work together, and defensively we stepped up.” Cru baseball nears conference as the end of the district season draws closer with the conference starting March 9 at Texas Lutheran University. “Find a way to get it done” is the team’s motto, and they obviously “get it done” with an 8-5 record. The men are confident they will advance well into the conference with the goal of winning the championship and ultimately, the national championship. “We have everything going in the right direction right now,” Head Coach Derek Dunaway said. “We definitely have a lot of talent in place, but we have the team chemistry, which I believe is more important than the talent.” Burrow commented on how strong the team has become and the accomplishments they have attained by “fitting together pieces of the puzzle” among their lineup, defense and pitching staff. With several obstacles to overcome, Dunaway believes the strength and talent to succeed are there to make it to the championship. Freshman accounting major and pitcher for the Cru Jamie Theriot said, “We’ve got a long way to go, but the way we have looked early on the mound and at the plate, it’s a strong indicator that we are strong competitors.” According to Dunaway, the team’s biggest strengths are leadership and experience and when combined with their physical talent, make them a difficult team to beat. Dunaway said there is a lot of “luck” involved with baseball and hopes it to be on their side. He describes baseball as a “mental game” since there is a lot of downtime between pitches. If a player misses at bat, he has to wait another 45 minutes before he goes up to bat again, so there is a lot of time to think what he did wrong on the bench. In order to be a good player, one cannot get too emotionally high or low during a game. Dunaway said, “They just have to give it their all and accept the results.”...

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Former Crusader takes on the NFL
Feb07

Former Crusader takes on the NFL

Many “boys of fall” aspire to play football in college but only dream about playing for the NFL. This dream  is coming true for UMHB’s own Jerrell Freeman, who was signed by the Indianapolis Colts three weeks ago. From University High School in Waco, to UMHB, to Canadian Football League, and now NFL, Freeman has an impressive football record. “If you want to do something and have the passion for it, go for it,” he said. Freeman played as a defensive end for the Cru from 2004 to 2007 and is still the all-time leader in tackles for the school. The Tennessee Titans drafted him during his senior year. At the time, he was a Cru team captain, named Defensive Player of the Year by D3football.com and three-time American Southwestern Conference First Team All-Conference selection. “UMHB has a really good (football) program, “ Freeman said. “They trained me well.” The CFL drafted Freeman after the Titans cut him before the season. He played for the Saskatchewan Roughriders, the worst team in the league at the time. In the three years he played for the team, he quickly made a name for himself by winning the CFL Defensive Player of the Week three times, runner-up for CFL Defensive Player of the Year even though he led the CFL with 144 tackles, 13 sacks, three interceptions and four fumbles. He was also named CFL All-Star and led his team to two CFL Grey Cup games. After his contract was up with the CFL, Freeman was scheduled to visit and work out with several different NFL teams, but his tour was cut short when the Colts gave him an offer he couldn’t refuse. “A UMHB player making it to the NFL has a major impact on us,” Vice President for Athletics Ben Shipp said. “It provides name recognition for UMHB and gains us another level of respect with the media and football establishment.” Shipp explains that it is a cycle. By recruiting good players, keeping good players, and continuing to win, more good players are drawn in, and the cycle continues. “It was always school, football, football, football growing up, and it just happened,” Freeman said. “It helped being on the front line of a great team, but I definitely never thought ‘NFL’ when I went into D3.” With 11 hours left to complete his bachelor’s degree in criminal justice from UMHB, Freeman struggles to find the time to finish his classes after football took him away before he could graduate. He stresses the importance of obtaining a college degree even for professional athletes and wants to set an example for other...

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Lacrosse: newest addition to Cru pastime

Clamp, rake, crease, pocket and crosse are not words that come to mind when one thinks of a sport, unless they are a “lax bro.” Crusaders are now stepping onto the lacrosse playing field all thanks to freshman psychology major Jonas Lanier, who organized the team. “I fell in love with the sport a long time ago after watching my older brother play, and I wanted to bring the game onto UMHB’s campus,” Lanier said. However, the process was hard. He spent many late nights finding players and getting finances approved. Eventually, everything worked out, and the men’s lacrosse team was official with 15 players, almost all freshmen and only five with prior lacrosse experience. “We struggle because of inexperience, but we have strong leaders to help us improve, and we are becoming a family,” freshman international business major Seth Stephens said. Despite a lack of experience, the team wasn’t scared of scheduling games against big competitors such as SFA, A&M, Baylor, Texas Tech, Austin College, UNT and Oklahoma State, just to name a few. They have been practicing two hours a day, four days a week for the past few months to prepare for their first game in Nacogdoches against SFA on Jan. 25. “We have a lot of great players but a really strong offense, and I really look forward to improving as a team to compete at a high level,” freshman history major Jonathan Irish said. Lacrosse takes the intensity from several sports: the defensive and offensive look of basketball, the field and non-stop running from soccer, and the harsh contact of football or hockey. Ten people in four positions are on the field at a time: three “middies” (mid-field), three defense, three attack and a goalie. “We look forward to having new players. Once you are part of the Lax Cru, you’re always a lax bro! All are welcome,” Lanier said. He describes the label “lax bro” as a title for experienced players who are proud of the lacrosse lifestyle. The sport requires dedication and tests one physically and emotionally. Most people who join lacrosse fall in love with the game and its very competitive environment. “Our team will continue as long as there are players that are willing to be proactive and play; we will progress and eventually get better supported,” Lanier said. With all the effort put forth to get the team together, members hope it will become a new university tradition for years. The team practices every Tuesday.-Thursday and Sunday from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. on the intramural fields behind McLane. Stephens said, “Anyone who wants to play should just come....

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