Goodbye McLane air-horn, you will be deeply missed
Feb08

Goodbye McLane air-horn, you will be deeply missed

Published in the February 8, 2017 issue of The Bells “The Air Horn” was born in late September, 2016. The death of “The Air Horn” was January 18, 2017 around 12:45 a.m. The owner of “The Air Horn” is unknown, but we can be certain that he is upset about the demise of his practical joke. “The Air Horn” will mostly be remembered for its loud appearance in the Orange Hall of McLane. It would go off at random hours during the day, once a day, for the entirety of the first semester and a week into the second semester. For the first few weeks of its appearance, “The Air Horn” was hated by many, an annoyance at the least. But after a few weeks it grew on everyone. “The Air Horn” became a common topic around not only the Orange Hall, but also around other halls in McLane. It was a mystery, which is why so many people loved the topic of it. “The Air Horn” is known as legendary throughout McLane. No one knew who controlled “The Air Horn”. RA Andrew Simons, a fifth-year senior Marketing major, said that he was able to eliminate five rooms from being the operator. However, he was never able to narrow it down further than that. Noah Tyner, a freshman Christian Studies major ,said “I was very sad that “The Air Horn” was gone. The joke was funny, but waking up at 1 am was not. I spent a good amount of time laughing about “The Air Horn” and how much disturbance it was causing… but now I cannot, and the world is a sadder place.” When asked what his favorite memory of “The Air Horn” was, Andrew Simons said, “My favorite memory was being able to hear the air horn every day. I didn’t know when it would sound, but I looked forward to hearing it. It was one of the constants in my life.” The morning after its confiscation on Jan. 18, Orange Hall held a memorial for “The Air Horn”. They reminisced about all the good memories they had with it. They laughed at all the happiness it had spread. These students mourned the loss of one of the most legendary college pranks they will ever be exposed to. Andrew Simons, along with the McLane administration, have officially announced the mascot of McLane Orange Hall to be an air horn in remembrance of “The Air Horn” that was loved by so many. It is more of a symbol since the noise policies will still be intact. However, they are looking to create a memorial to be placed in...

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Who should get the check?
Feb08

Who should get the check?

Published in the February 8, 2017 issue of The Bells It is the modern age question, “who should pay for the date?” The generations before us had a simple answer to that question. The man is always responsible for paying. However, we live in a society where women are CEOs, politicians and successful business owners. If our society is advanced enough to put women into positions of power, shouldn’t they be allowed to pay for a date as well? Despite our advanced world, my personal opinion is that the man should always be the one to pay, regardless of the income of the woman. Plain and simple. It comes down to manners and respect. A man should always be a gentleman. When he doesn’t pay it makes him look less like a gentleman. And let me tell you guys, girls prefer a gentleman to any other kind of guy out there. Women have undoubtedly gained more independence. I believe the reason for this is because a gentleman is becoming harder and harder to find. So, yes, the man should be responsible for the check because that is what a true gentleman with manners and respect would do. Now ladies, you too have your own responsibilities as well. You should never take financial advantage of a man just because he is respectful enough to be willing to pay. In order to be a good date, a woman should show her appreciation to the man for paying for dinner or tickets or whatever it was that he spent his hard-earned money on. Small gestures such as writing notes of appreciation or cooking a thoughtful meal goes a long way in a relationship. Women should also be cautious about insisting to pay for a date. Even if she feels an obligation to pay, she should be careful. Some men may take offense to a woman wanting to pay. They may see it as “oh, she doesn’t think that I can provide.” This could hurt a man’s pride, especially on a first date. There are some exceptions to the rules though. Women, I would suggest waiting until you’re a few dates in to pay for a date, just to show your appreciation to the man. The best kinds of dates for a woman to pay for at the beginning of the relationship would be a coffee date or a date to get ice cream. If you are in a more serious relationship, it is okay to pick up the check every once in a while. This is an easy way to show him that you care, without making him feel unneeded. Ultimately, a...

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Cru wins National Championship! – The Fans
Jan25

Cru wins National Championship! – The Fans

Published in the January 25, 2017 issue of The Bells In December, students, parents and fans alike all traveled to Salem, VA to cheer the Crusader football team to their National Championship win. These fans got to experience the game of a lifetime for any UMHB football fan. Mike McCarthy, director of the Campus Activities Board sent six buses full of students, a total of 336 fans, to help cheer on the Cru football team. Although planning for this adventure started about a week-and-a-half before the Stagg Bowl, it didn’t take long for every spot on the fan buses to be filled. The lucky fans who earned a spot on the trip received transportation, a stay at the Opryland Hotel, a ticket to the game, a t-shirt, and a spirit sign. “It was a lot of quick planning, but it was totally worth it to give that experience [of going to a national championship game] to the students,” McCarthy said. Isaac Felan, a sophomore EC-12 Physical Education major, was one of the students that was able to go to the game. He said the experience was a memorable one. “It was an experience for a lot of students; being the loudest we’ve ever been at a game, but also the coldest,” Felan said, “It was awesome to see the guys play and win.” Sharon Rately, a parent that attended the game said, it’s not every day that the “small town” guys become the heroes. “Small towns and thriving cities alike were able to be united as one to support our Crusaders,” she said. The fans that were able to attend the National Championship game cheered their hearts out for the purple and gold, even in the frigid Virginia temperatures. But most attendees said it was worth it to create lasting memories and watch their team become National Champions for the first time in the history of the UMHB football...

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Students celebrate Christmas in various forms across the globe

Published in the December 7, 2016 issue of The Bells Many of us have grown up in the United States associating Christmas with stockings, Nativity scenes, caroling, and sugar cookies. But those who are descendants of other cultures, sometimes have their own traditions when it comes to the holiday season. Mexico Professor Karla González grew up in Mexico, surrounded by Christmas traditions that combine the classic Spaniard/Catholic traditions with those of the indigenous people. “The Christmas celebrations in Mexico typically last two weeks and are very family-oriented,” Gonzalez said. “One of the most important traditions of the Mexican culture is the celebration of Las Posadas, where a group of people walk around the city to recreate Mary and Joseph coming to Bethlehem.” The group of walkers knock on a predetermined door and are rejected, as Mary and Joseph were at many of the inns. They continue this route of knocking on doors while singing a song about Mary’s story. In the end, the group will convene at a home, where they are invited inside. There is a big celebration with many family members and friends inside the house. The turkey or ham isn’t what you would eat for Christmas dinner in Mexico; instead, several varieties of tamales are served. “The ladies will all get together in advance and spend an entire day making tamales in preparation for the Christmas season,” Gonzalez said. “These tamales are filled with chicken or pork, but there is also a sweet variety for dessert.” They also serve many warm drinks during their celebrations since many times there are so many people that they have to celebrate outside. One of these drinks is a traditional atole. This is a corn dough-based drink, flavored with sugar cane and seasonal fruits. “They also serve a fruit punch, but not an American version,” she said. “It’s one more like a hot cider made with local tropical fruits, and boiled with cinnamon and sugar cane.” The children in Mexico do believe in Santa Clause, but when they receive presents they believe it was brought by Baby Jesus. One way you see this is by the nacimientos found in the plazas and at home. These elaborate Nativity scenes are more important to the Mexican culture than a Christmas tree. Australia To our friends down under, the concept of “let it snow” is completely foreign. Australian traditions are very unique and adapted to the climate that they live in. Dr. Claire Phelan grew up in Australia and shared some of her favorite Christmas traditions. “Walking down the streets there is the Australian equivalent to seeing the Macy’s Christmas displays in New...

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London studies program celebrates 10 years of cultural immersion

Published in the Oct. 26, 2016 issue of The Bells Ten years ago, four students were starting packing lists, making sure their passports were in order, buying clothing appropriate for cooler weather, and meeting with each other, preparing for the journey ahead. While the rest of the student body was getting ready for the end of the fall semester, four students were getting ready to spend their spring semester in London, England. These four students were the ones who received the opportunity to go on the maiden voyage of the London Studies program at UMHB. Ten years later, the program has given many other students the opportunity to spend the spring semester of either their sophomore, junior, or senior year experiencing the city of London. “[This program] has been a remarkable experience for all the students who have participated,” said the professor in charge of organizing the program, Dr. David Holcomb. “It is amazing to see students transformed by living and studying in London.” The London Studies program is a luxury trip compared to students that study abroad in public universities. Students don’t just attend classes in London, they get to experience the history and culture that the city has to offer. In fact, this program has discouraged the use of classrooms. Rather, students learn with the city as their classroom. Some of the classes are held at historical sights or at museums, while others visit these attractions many times. In addition to learning outside of the classroom, students go to at least one theatrical production a week, and every Friday they go on day trips, visiting other nearby cities or famous attractions in the area. The highlight of time spent in London studying abroad comes halfway through the semester when the students get to go on a 10-day coach tour of Northern England, Scotland, and Whales. This short trip includes visiting and experiencing the cities of York and Edinburgh, as well as staying a couple of nights in a lodge in the Scottish Highlands. This program offers a once-in-a -lifetime opportunity. And the cost is kept at just a small number above the price of tuition. “Very few programs take you on trips,” Holcomb said. “This trip is unmatched for what is included in the program.” Since the first four students went to London in 2007, some positive changes have occurred. One of the best changes is that students now get to live in London flats that offer a kitchen. The first year’s students were living in European-style hotels that didn’t offer as many comforts as what they receive now. The program, which had once just included Hardin-Simmons...

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