Presidential debate at SGA: Voting opens soon
Feb21

Presidential debate at SGA: Voting opens soon

There is a vote coming up this week for SGA president. If there is one organization on campus that truly encompasses the entire student body, it would be the Student Government Association, (SGA). SGA is the mediator between the student body and administrators. They are the ones who listen to student concerns and voice those concerns to the administration. SGA is also in charge of chartering new organizations. SGA consists of 35 members, including class representatives, student body representatives, and delegates for commuters, military, international and student athletes. SGA has had a big impact on campus. If you have ever received an ‘A’ with a 90.02 percent SGA is to thank for that. A few years ago, the grading scale was skewed so that an ‘A’ was 91-100 percent. SGA became an advocate for students and their GPAs by passing a resolution that changed the grading scale so that a 90-100 percent was considered an ‘A’. SGA was also in charge of raising the amount of printer points from 10 dollars to 15 dollars last year. As well as advocating for more lighting in the Quad and around residential areas to improve student safety. Junior double major in Political Science with an emphasis in Pre-Law and Speech Communication, Tyler Baker, is the current Student Body Vice-President “My favorite part of SGA is being able to serve the student body and be a voice for my peers. I have always wanted to be a part of something bigger than myself and SGA provides a way for me to do that,” Baker said. Student Government Association meetings are held every Tuesday night at 9 p.m. in the Fowler Board Room. Meetings are open to the public, so if you want to see what SGA is advocating for you, feel free to visit one of the meetings. On Monday Feb. 19, SGA held a debate between the two candidates who are running for the student body president. In the meeting, the two candidates, Tyler Baker and Daniel Martinez, answered questions about policies and values they would strive for if they were voted as president. Students will be able to vote for the next student body president starting on Wednesday Feb. 21 through Friday Feb. 23. Students can watch the live stream of the debate from the SGA’s facebook...

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UMHB hosts annual  Writer’s Festival
Feb21

UMHB hosts annual Writer’s Festival

This year’s Windhover Writer’s Festival featured writing styles from poetry to prose and hosted three keynote writers, as well as a songwriting duo, who presented their work with readings. Each author also hosted a workshop for participants to help sharpen their writing skills, since the idea of the festival is to motivate writers of all levels and skill sets.This year’s Windhover Writer’s Festival featured writing styles from poetry to prose and hosted three keynote writers, as well as a songwriting duo, who presented their work with readings. Each author also hosted a workshop for participants to help sharpen their writing skills, since the idea of the festival is to motivate writers of all levels and skill sets.The festival was hosted on Feb. 14-16 in Bawcom Student Union at UMHB. It is named after the journal, The Windhover, which has been around since 1997, according to the journal’s editor and associate professor of the English department, Dr. Nathaniel Hansen. Writer Suzanne M. Wolfe of England, who now resides in Seattle as a Writer in Residence at Seattle Pacific University, was one of the presenters. Wolfe’s writing inventory includes book, essays, and blogs. Wolfe is a well-acclaimed Christian writer. Her fiction novel, Confession of X, was based partially on her travels with her husband. Wolfe’s workshop gave attendees tips and pointers regarding fiction writing. The second presenter was Amy Peterson. Peterson is a writer and an adjunct professor at Taylor University. Peterson’s works have been featured in a wide variety of journals and her book, Dangerous Territory: My Misguided Quest to Save the World. Peterson’s writing can be raw and honest, but it truly encompasses her Christian background.   See Festival, pg. 3          Her workshop specialized in nonfiction. The third presenter was Thom Caraway. Caraway is an associate professor at Whitworrth University. Caraway is also the editor-in-chief for Rock&Sling, a journal of witness. He also founded and publishes of Sage Hill Press. His poems have been featured in a many journals throughout the country and his workshop focused on poetry. His reading was interesting and kept the audience entertained as he read some of his best poems. Still on the Hill was the featured musical duo, which makes do with a wide variety of traditional instruments from the Ozarks, such as the banjo, fiddle and harmonica. Still on the Hill hosted a writing workshop as well as a concert on Thursday night.  The addition of music to the Writers’ Festival was a great touch. Many students enjoyed hearing the band play their unique style of music. A slew of writers from all over the country to serve as panelists. Authors included Elizabeth Dell, Chris...

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Things to consider before investing in a business
Feb09

Things to consider before investing in a business

Students in today’s world are always looking for money. A college education can be costly and finding a job that pays a decent amount is hard to do without a degree. Therefore, many students have turned to becoming distributors for companies that sell products such as cosmetics, jewelry or clothes. Many times students will invest in these companies because they think it is an easy way to make fast money. However, students tend to not do their research. When that happens, these “fast money” businesses can turn into money traps. This leads us to the question, “should students start a business while in college?” There is no easy answer to this question due to the incredibly complicated nature of these businesses. So here’s some advice that students should consider before they invest in a business. Make sure you understand what the business entails. Some of these businesses require a hefty fee to join. Others require you to order and sell a certain amount either monthly or quarterly and if you do not meet that amount you could lose your distributor status. Make sure you have the available funds it takes to start the business. Many of these companies advertise the best of the best success stories. They show the distributors that made $100,000 or more in their first year. What they don’t show is the amount that these distributors invested initially before they became successful. Make sure you have time to invest in your business. These businesses rely on a large social media presence. First you have to take the time to set up a social media page that is welcoming and informing. Daily posts, games, and giveaways are what will bring in the buyers. In addition, you will have to take time to host parties and demonstrations online and in person. Investing your time and money to be a distributor can be a good thing for college students. However, to be successful, one must consider the pros and cons of a business venture. If one of these businesses appeals to you, remember to do your research and talk to other distributors before taking the plunge into the business...

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Reaching Out helps community, encourages students to serve
Nov16

Reaching Out helps community, encourages students to serve

Reaching Out is an event that allows students to serve alongside one another, and give back to the community around them. While this event has been a tradition for many years, this November 4th marked the first year students have had the chance to be involved in planning the event’s service activities. Sarah Herbsleb, a sophomore who participated in Reaching Out last year, was eager to apply for the newly-formed steering committee. “Reaching Out is one of my favorite events at UMHB. It has impacted my life simply by the people I have been able to serve through it.” When Hersleb heard that Reaching Out would have a steering committee she knew she wanted to be a part of it. “I saw how big this event could get and how much more of an impact we could have on the Belton and Temple community,” she said. As this tradition grows, faculty and students are hoping to not only touch the lives of more people in the community, but encourage more students to give back. “I want to see Reaching Out become an event that the campus and the community gets excited about,” said Reaching Out co-director, Nathan VanDolzer. “One thing that we are excited for is letting people sign up together. and bond through service.” Most student-led activities on campus have their own steering committee to plan out every aspect of the event. Director of student organizations, Tiffany Wurdemann realized that events were more successful when they had a separate committee. So even though Student Government Association (SGA) hosted Reaching Out in previous years, Wurdemann knew a steering committee would provide more opportunities for more student involvement. “We decided to give it a try and take it out of SGA. Since then it has truly flourished,” Wurdemann said. She is hopeful that these changes will impact the campus and community in a positive way. This year, around 250 people gathered together on a Saturday morning to participate in Reaching Out. These volunteers helped out at Feed My Sheep, a soup kitchen for the homeless,helped with demolition at a boy’s shelter, and visited senior homes in the area to play games with the elderly. Leah Smith, sophomore public relations major, and a director for Reaching Out said, raking leaves and picking up trash might seem like a small act of service, but it can mean a clean yard, a new start, and a fresh look at life for the recipient. “My favorite part of Reaching Out is hearing from the sites after everything is done and hearing how much of an impact the students have made,” she...

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Men and women’s basketball begin 2017 season
Nov15

Men and women’s basketball begin 2017 season

As the football team prepares to enter the playoffs, the men’s and women’s basketball teams are preparing for their opening games. This year should be a good season for both teams. As the football team prepares to enter the playoffs, the men’s and women’s basketball teams are preparing for their opening games. This year should be a good season for both teams. Last year, the men’s basketball team finished the season with a record of 16-10. They won all of their games at home. This year they are coming back with a more experienced team. The men only lost three seniors from a roster that included 11 freshmen in the 2017 season. This year they have fewer freshmen and more people with experience. According to Aubrie King, a senior education major who is starting his second basketball season with the Cru, the team’s biggest rival is Hardin-Simmons. Last year the Crusaders lost to Hardin-Simmons 112-120 in double overtime and 76-77 in their second meeting of the season.  The team will face-off against the Cowboys Jan. 11 and Feb. 3.King admits that Hardin-Simmons isn’t the only team they’re hoping to beat this season. “Honestly anyone who beat us last year, especially on our home floor, is someone that we could consider a ‘rival,’ if for no other reason than that we just really want to beat them,” he said.The men’s basketball team is focused on their team motto, “win the next game,” so right now they are looking forward to the season opener at Shreiner Wednesday, Nov. 15. While the men’s basketball team is relying on experienced players, the women’s basketball team is hoping to gain momentum with some new players. They lost four seniors from last year and only have two seniors on the roster this year. The team also has a new assistant coach. Niya Johnson, a former member of the women’s basketball team at Baylor University, is hoping to help head coach Mark Morefield capture the coveted championship win. Last year, the team finished the season with a record of 18-9, winning 11 of their 12 home games. This year, they hope to improve their record even more. The women’s basketball team will host Texas Lutheran University Thursday, Nov. 16 at 7...

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