Summer break ideas
Apr24

Summer break ideas

Summer is almost here, so get ready to set aside those textbooks and have some fun in the sun. Whether it’s hanging out with friends or exploring someplace new, this is a great time of year to get out and try something different. You might be one of the many people who are stuck without summer plans, or maybe you just don’t know what to do yet. However, don’t be alarmed because there are many fun and adventurous activities out there for you do, and many of them are right at your finger-tips. 1. Take a road trip. Gather some friends together and explore a new city or town. Texas is known for many things from the Austin hill country to fascinating historic monuments, and there is always something new to discover here. Not only that, but there are also many other states just waiting to be explored. After all, there is nothing quite like taking a drive on an open American road. 2. Have a bonfire. Summer is a great time to gather around the camp-fire and spend the evening singing and roasting s’mores. Playing games is also a popular bonfire activity, and it will ensure that everyone has a great time. Having a bonfire is a great idea for bonding with the family. It’s also a great way to reconnect and spend time with the ones you love. 3. Take a trip to the zoo. Take a day out the house to go visit some furry friends at your local zoo. Most zoos even offer annual passes which include year-round admission. Besides that, what’s cooler than seeing lions relaxing in the sun or a bear drinking from a stream? 4. Attend a festival. Do you enjoy live music, fun contests and food trucks? Summer festivals offer every one of these things and are always full of excitement. They are also a great way to meet new people and learn about different cultures. Typi-cally, they go on for sev-eral days at a time, which guarantees you plenty of time to have tons of fun. 5. Spend the weekend camping. Camping is a great way to have fun and get in touch with nature for a few days. Whether it’s jumping in a lake, go-ing for a hike or relaxing by the fire, this option will allow you to enjoy the great outdoors and wind down for a bit. So what are you waiting for? Find your sleeping bag and start...

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Students honor Month of the Military Child
Apr02

Students honor Month of the Military Child

The month of April is known for numerous holidays such as Easter, April Fools’ Day and Earth Day. However, what many people don’t know is that April is also the Month of the Military Child. This is a special time of the year dedicated to honoring the children of military parents all over the world. UMHB takes great pride in recognizing students who fall into that category. There are approximately two million military children all over the U.S., ranging from newborns all the way up to 18-year-olds (sheerid). Their lives seem to be no easy task, as many of them endure lots of challenges such as anxiety, separation and relocation. “One of the most challenging things about being a military kid is moving around,” said Micki Hutchins, a freshman social work major. “I learned to only make surface-level friends because moving away from a best friend after two to three years over and over again became too painful. However, I have a great relationship with my immediate family because of this.” Many organizations around the world take advantage of the month and hold events to honor those who are children of military parents. The Department of Defense Education Activity and The Department of Defense team work together to encourage schools to plan events dedicated to the Month of the Military Child. Operation Megaphone is a worldwide event dedicated to connecting military teens around the world and helping them discuss everyday issues that they face. Many group seven hold specific days for  people to wear purple in an effort to show their support. A lot of organizations also hold events such as contests and festivals. Senior filmstudies major Viranda Brooks described events that she has participated in. “When I was younger and lived on a base in Germany, they had a big carnival with free prizes and food,” she said. “It was a lot of fun.” While their parents are deployed in other parts of the country, many dependents have to find ways to cope with the fact that their parents are gone. Some children do not understand why their parents have to leave for such long periods of time, and this can make them angry. Being able to communicate is one of the most important ways children of military parents can deal with their parents’ absence. Writing letters is one of the main ways they communicate, as many people in the military do not have access to cell phones or other communication devices. It is also important for people of authority such as teachers, counselors and non-military parents to be as helpful and supportive as possible. “I would always go to my mom and see...

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Dr. Joey Tabarlet: Professor and friend
Apr02

Dr. Joey Tabarlet: Professor and friend

UMHB’s Communication and Media Studies Department chair Dr. Joey Tabarlet has been inspiring students on campus since 1995. Tabarlet is also a movie buff, cat lover, dad-joke comedian and guitarist. Besides teaching, his research explores major historical events in mass media and moral depictions in film. He has also been involved with curriculum development and assessments. Tabarlet has been president of the UMHB faculty assembly and served on the Promotion and Tenure Committee, the Honors Committee and the Nominating Committee. He also founded the Central Texas Film Society. “I thought he was a very interesting professor to have,” freshman film studies major Sarah McGirk said. “He had a lot of interesting stories and real-world information that made the class easier to understand and relate to.” McGirk said that she felt challenged by the assignments he gave, and she noted that he always made sure to give feedback for improvements. Anytime she did not understand a topic, she said that he was very helpful in explaining things. “As a freshman, I found it refreshing to have a professor who treated his students like adults and let us talk and work at our own pace. While the class did require work, it felt accomplishable. I really loved having Dr. Tabarlet and hope I get to take another one of his classes sometime in my college career,” McGirk said. Tabarlet earned both his Bachelor and Master of Arts degrees from Louisiana State University. His doctorate is from Florida State University. He taught at Wesleyan College in Georgia for three years before coming to UMHB in 1995 as the chair of the Speech and Drama Department, which would later become the Department of Communication and Media Studies. Since then, Tabarlet has taught many courses including Introduction to Mass Media, Film Studies and Public Speaking. He credits his interest in the communication field to his experiences in high school and college. “I was on the speech debate team in high school and college,” Tabarlet said. “That was a turning point because that really determined what I wanted to do.” It was there that he found his love for speech and debate. “I’ve taught public speaking a lot,” Tabarlet said. “This semester is the first semester in 10 or 15 years I haven’t taught Public Speaking, so I really miss it.” Tabarlet’s colleagues are also appreciative of his contributions to the school. “I’ve worked with him for a number of years in the Honors program,” said English professor Brent Gibson. “I enjoy working with him and he’s been very helpful in the Honors Seminar. I really appreciate him as a colleague and enjoy his...

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Faith in Action hosts Arise awareness event
Mar20

Faith in Action hosts Arise awareness event

Domestic violence is something that no person should ever have to face. It happens not only here in America, butin many different countriesand cultures as well. To help address this issue, Faith in Action, a student group sponsored by the Baptist Student Ministry, featured this subject at Arise, an event they held in McLane Great Hall on Thursday, Feb. 28. Their mission was to break the silence and address important topics happening in our world today. Members of Aware Central Texas, a nonprofit organization dedicated to preventing child abuse and family violence in and around the Bell Country area, participated in the event. Blanca Ortiz, the group’s family violence case manager, was one of the first speakers of the night. She discussed some facts about domestic violence and what people may not know about it. “Female victims are more likely to report than males are,” Ortiz said. “It’s something that’s very serious and needs to be talked about.” There are many different forms of domestic violence, including not only physical abuse, but also verbal, emotional and sexual abuse. Unfortunately, many people don’t leave the situation in hope that the abuser may soon change. Some victims also fear that telling authorities will only cause bigger problems. However, Ortiz advised that calling the police will not result in trouble. Aware Central Texas provides many resources for domestic violence victims, some of which include clothing, shelter, and a 24/7 support hotline. They also offer many different services such as safety planning, danger assessments and support groups. Shortly after Ortiz’s speech, Briana Frederickson, who is serving as the current Miss Mary Hardin-Baylor, came onstage to deliver her testimony and talk about her personal connection with domestic violence. “Through all of it, I cycled between feeling broken and lost, to angry and cynical, to numb and apathetic,” Frederickson said. “I tried to make sense of everything that was happening but could not find the answers. So for the most part, it was easier to just shut off my emotions and my thoughts. That way, I didn’t have to deal with it.” Though Frederickson faced many trials and tribulations, the things she endured only brought her closer to God. As a social work major, she uses her strengths and what she went through to help others who may be dealing with similar situations. “If I could encourage others to seek help, I would first like to say something to them personally,” Frederickson said. “For those of you still trapped in darkness, those of you who can’t get to the surface, you are doing so well. You are holding on and you are fighting so well. Your time for...

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Student organization BRIDGEs the gap

UMHB held its second meeting for a new organization on campus called Cru Bridge on the third floor of Bawcom Student Union on Thursday, Feb. 14. Cru Bridge is a multicultural club that is meant to celebrate diversity and emphasize internationality. The club is encouraging people to join, explaining that it is educational while allowing students to experience cultures that they may have never been exposed to before. “I’ve noticed a lot of people from UMHB tend to be homeschooled or from small towns, and growing up in those environments doesn’t really allow people to taste different cultures,” freshman Bridge Club President Cecilia Nguyen said. “This club will allow for that to be accessible and fun.” “I love the idea that emerged from the creation of the group itself,” Dat Nguyen, a freshman biology pre-med major, said. “As you know, the United States is a country of immigrants. There are so many different ethnicities and cultures existing here where we live. And Cru Bridge is a place where we can be exposed to and learn about different people with different backgrounds. I’m excited about the knowledge that I can gain, the people that I can meet, and a chance to show new people the wonderful things of my culture as well as the common culture on the U. S.” The club was brought about when three students, Vydia Lu, Tu Le and Cecilia Nguyen came together, wanting an organization dedicated toward international students. After much consideration, the students took the idea to the Student Government Association in the fall. They went through the required steps for approval, leaving many of the SGA members fascinated with their topic and goals. The organization was soon approved, and Cru Bridge held their first meeting on Jan. 31. Cru Bridge plans to be involved in many upcoming activities, including a multicultural festival in March. This festival will be held in collaboration with the Association of Black Students and the Hispanic Student Association. Some of the many activities that may be included in the festival are a Tai Chi demonstration, Chinese calligraphy and a Folklorico dance show. In April, Cru Bridge also plans to collaborate with the Psychological Science Club and have a panel of students of color talk about their experience with UMHB. “We just want to be a bridge for multiple different people or groups, including people who grew up in different cultures,” Cecilia Nguyen said. The club wants their meetings to include activities that represent the idea of internationality. “We want to have cultural games that people played as children and introduce those to people,” said the Cru Bridge adviser Dr. Haedy Liu. The next meeting will be held on Feb. 28 in Conference Room A, located on the second floor of Bawcom Student Union. All students are invited and encouraged to...

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