Seniors paint years of memories
Apr24

Seniors paint years of memories

From oil painting to graphic design, seniors Ellen Buhrow,  Abigail Davidhizar and Alec MacLaughlin have been working throughout their college careers to create a display for their final exam. Their exhibit will run April 30 to May 5 in the Tyson Art Gallery on the second floor of the Townsend Library. Their college pilgrimage comes to a close with their last art exhibit on campus. “The senior exhibition is the capstone event for an art major. After four years, we expect that they put together a body of mature work based on their interests,” said Ted Barnes, dean of the College of Visual and Performing Arts and who oversees the exhibitions every year. “I think you’ll see that it will be an interesting show.” Davidhizar is an art major with an emphasis in graphic design.  Because of her area of expertise, her work will range from wall-size murals she created for the new field house, to posters of the Miss UMHB Pageant last year. “I had to go back and, of course, tweak my work, but for the most part it’s been work that I’ve done throughout my classes, which is a relief when you think about doing all new work for a theme,” Davidhizar said. A cherished memory of her time at UMHB is the trip she  took to Paris last May. “My favorite part was just having a map in my hand and figuring out the city,” she said. Also exhibited will be Mac Laughlin’s digital graphic design work. Presenting alongside them is Buhrow, who created a series of paintings about love. Her idea was to capture the emotion between couples. “All of my work is of either engaged or married couples arranged in a way that you can see the intimacy in their eyes or in their touch. I also wanted to take it to another level with older couples who have passed that stage of being in love, but they still have that connection,” Buhrow said. Although she is recently engaged, she insists this had nothing to do with the theme she chose. “My fiance and I have been dating for three and a half years, so he’s been with me through the entire series. I didn’t think about it specifically, but I think that did help me understand what those couples were feeling,” she said. After graduation, Buhrow wants to become an art professor, hoping to glorify God through her work. She said, “It’s my favorite thing to be down in the middle of the night working on a painting. I think that has a lot to do with the support system that the...

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Help for the homeless
Mar27

Help for the homeless

With nearly 500 homeless men, women and children in the Belton area, organizations are surfacing to provide the  basic necessities taken for granted by those who have never wanted or lost, such as school supplies or shoes to wear to a job interview. Many homeless people, however, go undocumented in the system, largely because they are unaware or ashamed to ask for the services available to them within the community. For Rosie, who wished to keep her last name private to protect the interests of her family, this has been the case for the three years she has lived in Texas. She doesn’t stand out in a crowd. She’s well versed, nicely dressed and educated, a former teacher on the East Coast. But below her cool exterior, there’s something she keeps hidden. She’s homeless. “When my husband left me high and dry, I lost everything trying to divorce him. I have family in Texas, so I came here. I’d be on the street if it weren’t for them,” she said. After losing her job, Rosie found out her husband was involved in an extra-marital affair and that he had no intentions of dissolving the marriage. She spent her savings trying to divorce him. When it was final, she was left alone. Now she moves from place to place, living off the little money she is able to make working part time for general labor wages. From motels, rented rooms and family members’ couches, she has moved an estimated 16 times in the past year. “Where I live depends on how much money I make, which varies widely from month to month. You can’t get a job worth anything without a permanent address,” she said as she took another bite of her bread and turkey sandwich, the only substantial meal she would have all day. Like so many others, Rosie’s pride keeps her from accepting help from local organizations designed specifically for people in her situation. This is the behavior Director of Programs for Families in Crisis Suzanne Armour wants to change. “Whether it’s because of domestic violence or because you’ve fallen on hard times, there’s no stigma in asking for help. We’re all a part of the same community, and we’re just all here to help each other,” she said. At its core, Families in Crisis deals with domestic violence and provides the emergency safe shelter, offers rental assistance and transitional housing for those who wish to escape dangerous situations It is an environment where the abused and downtrodden can feel safe and, at the least, at home. Although facilities like this exist to help those who need it,...

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Wynne speaks on European economy
Mar06

Wynne speaks on European economy

A healthy-sized crowd welcomed Vice President and Senior Economist for the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas Dr. Mark Wynne to Manning Chapel Feb. 22. As a part of the university Honors Program, his lecture on globalization and the financial crisis of 2008 concerned a topic all too familiar to anyone living above ground since the recession began in 2007. Assistant Professor and department chair of psychology Dr. Trent Terrell found the topic of particular interest given the world’s current economic climate. He admits he didn’t know more than many others about the economic crisis but was interested in hearing from someone who truly understands the issues on a global level. “I thought he was incredibly knowledgeable,” Terrell said. “He managed to convey a massive amount of information in a way that a mixed audience could follow and understand.  I specifically appreciated how apolitical his talk was. So often discussion of economic issues is laced with political blame and agendas.  He described the data without editorializing, which was quite refreshing.” Wynne’s focus was explaining the concept of globalization and its driving factors, free trade and immigration and how they work together to intertwine the world’s different economies. Unity may sound like a pleasant idea, but when financial irresponsibility, excessive borrowing and consumption binges come into play, the term takes on a more ominous connotation. He began by saying that globalization has been around since the largest period of integration in 1913 during WWI and has played a major role in the most dramatic economic downturn since the Great Depression. The concept can be a mouth full for anyone without a mind for economic jargon, and sensing this may be the case, Wynne defined the term as “the increased interdependence of national economies as the result of the freer flow of goods, services, capital and labor.” “Nowhere in this definition,” he assured the audience, “does it mention someone in China taking your job.” The collective sigh of relief was hard to miss. During World War I, the U.S. economy sky-rocketed above the competition so much so that the rest of the world thought they’d never catch up. According to current trends, however, by 2015 China will surpass the U.S. to become the biggest economy in the world, ushering in one of the most significant fundamental changes in economic activity since 1913. Wynne explained that the more countries share with each other, the more intertwined their economies become, making each economy more vulnerable to negative impacts from misfortune and irresponsibility around the globe. Take for example Greece. The sovereign nation doesn’t have the best financial track record and has spent the majority...

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MIA: British star’s “attack” on Americans
Feb21

MIA: British star’s “attack” on Americans

Artist MIA’s obscene gesture during the halftime performance of Super Bowl XLVI raises questions of intended terrorism. There have been Janet’s boobs, Rosanne Barr’s desecration of the national anthem and a finger belonging to vocalist MIA that have upset the American public. MIA, born Maya Arulpragasam, looked into the camera and gave the middle finger during Madonna’s Super Bowl halftime performance Feb. 5. The gesture sent outrage and discomfort through enough of the 111.3 million viewers tuned in that night to issue dual press statements from NBC and the NFL. “The obscene gesture in the performance was completely inappropriate, very disappointing, and we apologize to our fans,” they said. Madonna weighed in on the ill-fated salute saying, “It’s such a teenager, irrelevant thing to do…. What was the point? It was just out of place.” She may have a point here, but apparently a portion of the viewers that evening believed her gesture was a direct attack on America, considering her self-described label as a supporter of terrorism and her affiliation with the Sri Lankan militant group, Tamil Tigers. While Madonna stuck to sex and sacrilege for her headlines, MIA is compelled by a violent separatist movement and the politics of resistance, although she lives a lifetime away in a plush home in Los Angeles. Her allegiances have fueled her music and rhetoric, and no defense she gives indicates that she wants it any other way. MIA’s affinity for the provocative has been her claim to fame since she went into labor while on stage during the 2009 Grammys with the likes of Jay-Z, Kanye West, T.I. and Lil Wayne present, but insisted on finishing the show and then proceeded to beg for attention for  her actions. In junior psychology and sociology double major Marisa Fannin’s mind, her most recent ploy for attention is basic marketing. “It’s obvious that sufficient buzz hadn’t been stirred up,” she said. “They needed something to talk about, and MIA provided them with just that.” Fannin didn’t witness the salute, but in the weeks since it aired, she has grown weary of the buzz. “There are so many other good things going on right now that I didn’t even notice this, and that’s exactly how the situation needs to be handled.” She has a point. Who, among the minimum wage, one-car, working class Americans without the luxury of a private jet, really cares? What’s one more middle finger in the midst of another performance that cost more than the income of 10 of the families watching the spectacle? In a society when the three most important things in life are what you’re wearing, who...

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Construction changes face of campus
Feb21

Construction changes face of campus

Once a well-kept secret in Texas, UMHB has grown into “the forefront of Christian higher education in the Southwest,” as President Dr. Randy O’Rear likes to call it. O’Rear, who is overseeing the current boom in construction on campus, graduated from UMHB in 1988 and became the first alumnus to serve as president. “The most fulfilling thing is the opportunity to enjoy relationships with students and getting to know them,” he said. “The thing that has never changed is the outstanding faculty and staff who invest in the lives of students. That’s the way it was when I was here.” His passion, stemming from his experience as an undergraduate, is rooted in the desire for students to form meaningful, professional relationships with professors, an aspect taken into serious consideration during the current significant growth period. While the physical setting has changed dramatically, the hallmark of the university remains the same, and O’Rear shared every faith that, as campus continues to expand, the commitment to faith-informed discernment will not falter. “That is what has always been so unique about Mary Hardin-Baylor,” he said. “Our school wouldn’t grow if faculty and staff weren’t making a meaningful difference in the lives of students.” When the campus somewhat begrudgingly went co-ed in 1971 just to keep its doors open, the future of the university was uncertain. But now, after years of strategic road mapping, keen leadership and an extensive four-year planning process, it’s time to begin work on the $100 million master plan, made possible largely by private donations. The transformation will include a 76,000-square-foot nursing education facility, 27,000-square-foot visual arts building, a stadium to seat upwards of 10,000 and a 107,000-square-foot student union building with several ancillary counterparts, all set for completion by the fall of 2013. Along with a performing arts center, set for completion by 2015,  these additions will add up to $75 million. “It’s not just important for us to keep growing. It’s necessary,” Chancellor and former President Dr. Jerry Bawcom said. He served as president for 17 years from 1991-2008, and when he spoke here for the first time in 1987, the campus left much to be desired. “Although it was a great institution and had great potential, it was a pretty dreary place,” he said. Bawcom’s tenure as president yielded several advancements, which added up to the most extensive round of rennovations in the 154-year history of the university, nearly doubling campus acreage from 150 acres to over 275. Without growth and an added student population, tuition would have to increase significantly, and the university’s facilities would become obsolete. Two ingredients are needed to maintain financial stability:...

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