Cru Culture: Learning your vocab
Oct23

Cru Culture: Learning your vocab

A guy you met just last week walks up and asks you if you want to go to the meth house with him. Instead of letting your jaw drop at the audacity of a stranger suggesting you head over to the local drug headquarters with him, there’s a few things you might want to know.   With half a semester under your belt, or your graduation gown in this case, you’re probably into the swing of things on campus. But there may be some UMHB terminology you’re still unsure of, and to avoid the embarrassment of some upperclassmen jeers, it’s time you read up.   The Meth House   Contrary to the obvious, this isn’t a sketchy building for buying illegal substances. When you hear students on campus throwing this phrase around, hold onto your books — it’s not what you think. Christ United Methodist Church in downtown Belton serves free lunch for college students on Wednesdays from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. It’s a weekly occasion most Crusader veterans frequent. Make sure you to throw a few bucks into the donation jar on your way out to keep the tradition alive. The meals change each time, but it’s always home-cooked and delicious.   The Thursday Chick-fil-A struggle   In case you’ve been living under a rock or in a single room in Stribling, Chick-fil-A in Temple serves discounted meals for college students on Thursdays. Showing your Cru Card grants you two magical things — free waffle fries and a free drink. What more can you ask for?   Norts, Chacos and Crunilla   You’ve probably heard at least one of these slang words thrown around in normal conversation. If someone mentions their Norts, it’s not a cheap kind of candy or an eclectic hipster name. Instead, this term refers to the Nike shorts that unfortunately fill most college students’ closets.   Then there’s the infamous Chaco footwear. These outdoorsy shoes are great for adventuring around Lake Belton and accompanying almost any outfit — or so they say.   If you’ve been to a Cru football game and not had Crunilla, you’re missing out. This purple Bluebell ice cream was made specifically for UMHB and will change the life of your tastebuds forever. Don’t ask why, but it’s better than the homemade vanilla, probably because of the color, but mostly because of the Cru spirit.     Now that you’ve learned all the terminology, been dubbed a Crusader forever, made it to class without getting lost, and realized that parking on campus isn’t worth a ticket, welcome home,...

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Cru Culture
Oct14

Cru Culture

If you’re not “yaking,” your social game is lacking — at least that’s what creators of the latest social networking app, Yik Yak, are hoping.   Though it’s not a game in the traditional sense of the word, it’s a social experiment for the honest, the bored and the nosy. Essentially, Yik Yak has become a back and forth game of secrets and blackmail, taking over college campuses one by one.   Upon downloading, users assume anonymous identities, literally invisible to participants. With such secrecy, writers can post anything they want. And I mean anything.   Restricted by location, your feed of posts differs depending on where you are at the moment. For example, students using Yik Yak on campus will only be reading UMHB gossip.   The app also allows “peeks,” where users can look at feeds from other universities, literally reading the dirty laundry of places like Stanford and Baylor.   Crusaders have taken to this free speech forum to express all sorts of sentiments, whether it be their frustrations with the university or their personal problems. While it can be as innocent as posting jokes or Monday encouragement, there’s a darker side to this conversation free-for-all.   Unfortunately, the yaks have turned into negativity and hatred, earning users Yakarama points, giving them no reason to stop.   Freshmen, overweight students and even the kid in the library playing his music too loud — these are just a few of the people being attacked by users of the app. Flaws are being exposed, and controversial opinions are being uploaded by the second. It’s like a public condemnation of sins, and stones are being thrown from countless users.   Many Crusaders have expressed their unhappiness with Yik Yak and the aftermath of its contents, so the university responded by blocking yaks on CruNet.   But nothing can be done about using cellular data for spilling secrets. The face of the app, the little mischievous Yak, will continue to spin as posts load on campus.   For those that are tired of reading and hearing these terrible things, delete the application — it will save you a lot of time and hurt.   Yakers, you may not be able to control what people say about you, but you do have the power to say, or not say, cruel things about...

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Students Skype Ansel Elgort
Sep17

Students Skype Ansel Elgort

Crusader siblings Victoria and Alyssa Fahy weren’t expecting the surprise of a lifetime this summer, and they definitely weren’t expecting to become friends with one of Hollywood’s hottest stars after an online chat.   But that’s exactly what happened when freshman exercise physiology major Alyssa Fahy received news from Ansel Elgort, the star of Divergent and The Fault in Our Stars, that he would be calling via Skype later that evening because she had won a giveaway.   “I didn’t really know who he was…. Victoria bought the song that entered me in the contest,” Alyssa confessed before her sister, junior cell biology major Victoria interrupted, “She won, and I didn’t.”   The youngest sister, 15 year-old Briana, was in on the deal too. The three made a pact that if any of them won, they would share the spoils. Or in this case, the screen time.   Elgort charades as a disc jockey under the name Ansolo, and he presented a contest to fans via Twitter to promote his music. By purchasing Ansolo’s latest track, “Totem,” Alyssa was entered into a raffle and ended up joining a handful of other lucky fans who came face to face with the celebrity thanks to modern technology.   When he called, the girls waited to see one of the most famous faces pop up on their laptop. The Divergent star sipped organic chocolate milk, sporting his famous white t-shirt and nonchalant attitude when the time came.   Before the conversation, Alyssa expected a “movie star-ish” man to be on the other end of their Skype call. But after talking to Elgort for just a few minutes, she tested the waters with some sarcasm and the 20-year-old answered with personality of his own.   “Did you guys all see The Fault in Our Stars? …. Have you seen any movie I’m in?” Elgort asked the girls, greeted by giggles.   During their 30 minutes, the actor shared information about himself with the Fahys, revealing a little bit about his chaotic schedule and hopes for the future.   “I think EDM is our generation’s style,” Elgort said in reference to being a DJ. “Before us, there was hip-hop. Before that, there was rock and roll…. Electronic dance music is taking over.”   He believes that a lot of the chart-topping songs have electronic undertones, and that it’s defining the industry. The scene as a whole is something he wants to be a part of.   “It (Totem) would never play on mainstream radio. It’s not that kind of track…. It’s unique and there’s not a lot of tracks like it out there, and...

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Letter from the editor
Sep17

Letter from the editor

Words are so powerful. That’s not something new to me. But these past two weeks have  reminded me just how much the things we say and do effect other people. The power of the tongue, whether in print or through word of mouth, can change someone’s day.   After running “Gay: Not the New Black,” last issue, a barrage of social media posts have been directed at this publication and staff.   First, I want to thank everyone who commented and shared the story — Thank you for illustrating the powerful impact of free speech. While going to UMHB has many perks, exercising the ability to express myself on a lot of different platforms is one of my favorites.   Many terrible things have been directed at me and the people I care about because of one writer’s opinion. To answer any doubts, yes I love the Lord with all my heart and would not want to compromise my love for Christ by allowing something hateful to be published, which brings me to my real point.   The previously published article did not, seek to condemn or disapprove of any people group. Instead, it sought to present a comparison brought up by publications like The Huffington Post. Comparing gays and African Americans did not start with The Bells. It’s an old and unfair weighing of two very different struggles, brought to our writer’s attention by larger media outlets.   The point of “Gay: Not the New Black” was not to deem either struggle as right or wrong. It wasn’t to question or mock any group of people. The only wrongness pointed out was in reference to the comparison of these two very real struggles. The writer provides his own opinion via his commentary, stating that he believes the physical violence inflicted on the black community cannot be compared to that of the LGBT community. Not to say that both groups haven’t suffered terrible, unfair and unnecessary hurt — they definitely have.   Yes, I believe in treating every single human being with kindness and courtesy. And even more so, I love this university and would never do anything to make people think otherwise.   It saddens me to hear that some alumni are ashamed to be affiliated with their alma mater because of one opinion piece.   Whether it’s a Facebook group or a comment, rather than lashing out at the people who published a sensitive story, I think we should all take a step back and remember what matters, and why so much disagreement has arisen.   Love. We should love each other. I don’t care who you...

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Cru Culture: Tinder
Sep17

Cru Culture: Tinder

Can you really swipe left or right to find true love?   Tinder, a “meet new people” app, seeks to do just that. The program has had an impact on college students everywhere, and UMHB is no different.   The application counts on the fact that people really do judge a book by its cover. When you sign on, you create a profile of pictures and a short biography of yourself. Then, Tinder technology takes over and provides you with profiles of the opposite sex that live within a certain distance of you.   If you like what you see, you swipe right and hope the other person does the same for your profile. If it’s a match, a conversation can be started from either end.   But if you swipe left, neither person ever knows and communication can’t be made in any way. Seems pretty simple, right?   Wrong.   There are always do’s and don’ts in the dating world, but how can you navigate the uncertain waters of this unconventional social site?   To all the men out there looking to find Mrs. Right, start with removing pictures of you with your exes and other random women. No matter how pretty the leading lady standing next to you in your photo is, it doesn’t make viewers of your profile jealous. It just makes them think you’re a player, and probably won’t get you many “right swipes.”   Then there’s the issue of starting a conversation. The guy should definitely make the first move and keep traditional chivalry as alive as possible in such a modern situation.   “Hey” just doesn’t cut it. In fact, a corny knock knock joke would be a better way to get a woman’s attention. She will probably have an inbox full of hellos. If you want to stand out, be original.   To the women, keep your biography simple. Telling the whole world you want to be a cat lady or that you frequent Starbucks just makes you look like everyone else, too.   Whether you’re new to an area, looking for love, or just searching for new friends, make your intentions clear in your profile, and you can save yourself some trouble.   All that to say, happy...

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