Daily deals sent to Groupon members

Social networking is rapidly moving along. Among the hundreds of popular sites, one stands among the rest. It is called Groupon. Launched in 2008, it is based out of Chicago but now is available all around the world. Groupon grew out of a website called The Point, launched in November 2007, that lets people start a campaign asking others to give money or do something as a group. It is a site where getting things on sale is an everyday occurrence, and users can pass those deals along to family and friends. Groupon offers several coupons a day covering many different types of products. For example, restaurants, gym memberships and entertainment.  Associate Professor of Business Marketing Dr. Chrisann Merriman, realizes Groupon is beneficial to students.  “Groupon is basically social buying,” she said. “Marketers love social buying because ultimately people will share what they bought.” Groupon began so people in large towns who run out of ideas on where to eat or where to shop can have a flow of new ideas every day. In some cases all they have to do is flash the coupon from Groupon to an associate, and the transaction is complete. However, it is not this simple for everyone. Groupon ,even with its millions of followers, is not widely available in small towns. Senior psychology major Lauren Rister said, “I’m from Houston, so I usually use (discounts) in Houston or Austin. Unfortunately for Belton, Temple and Killeen, there are not a lot (of Groupon coupons) available. Groupon needs to offer more discounts in small college towns where students are broke.” Groupon has a feature called match-up, which enables people to start groups  in which they all become members of that group and share their finds. Administrative assistant to the vice president for Student Life Jheri Lynn Smith likes the concept of Groupon.  “The site is very easy to use without a lot of clutter,” she said.  “You can easily make purchases to use in other cities in the U.S. with ease.” Not only can the coupons be used for yourself, but also for others. “One unique feature that I like is the option to purchase a Groupon service or product as a gift for someone,” Smith said. While Groupon is said to be going through some financial woes due to owing more money than they have, the company is expected to come out on top. Merriman  thinks Groupon has competition with social networking. She said, “Facebook is starting to do some small little things like Groupon in their Facebook marketplace, so they might start giving out discounts since Facebook does have a bigger name.” Overall,...

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Peace Day celebration to be held

Wednesday, Sept. 21 marks a day of cease-fire, both personal and political. Back in 1982, the U.N. established Peace Day in order to help make peace in relationships as well as in conflicts of the world. The BSM and UMHB art department are doing their small part of acknowledging the International Day of Peace by hosting a service in Manning Chapel at 5:15 p.m. tomorrow. One Voice, directed by Matthew Crosby, will perform. Dr. Jessica Hooten, assistant professor of English, will recite a reading and Dr. Shawn Shannon, director of the BSM, will lead a prayer. In preparation for this event, hand-painted pinwheels have been placed in the flower beds in front of the library. This is the university’s third year to participate in the peace project. Professor of art and co-organizer of Peace Day Helen Kwiatkowski helped initiate the Peace Day on campus as well as an off-campus festival. “It will be a way of offering our private hopes and collective prayers for peace,” she said. The art for peace festival  was created three years ago in order to raise money for the Children’s Advocacy Center of Belton by selling pinwheels. The third annual festival for the community was held Sept. 10 at Cedarbrake Retreat Center in Belton. The festival consisted of live entertainment, poetry readings, home-made snacks and the opportunity to purchase one of the hand-crafted pinwheels. Among the live music performed for the festival was one of Kwiatkowski’s good friends. Singer/song writer and entertainer Emily Kaitz said, “It was just overwhelming especially for this area. She has continued to do this…. I am very happy to be part of this.”  Senior fine arts major, Lauren Cross enjoys helping with the event. “This is the third annual Peace Day (for UMHB), and I’ve helped with all of them. Helen Kwiatkowski holds the festival every year and from the kindness in her heart, she takes time out of her own life and her own day to raise money for the Children’s Advocacy Center of Belton. The T-shirts were made by Pat Seals, and all the money goes straight to the kids to support them and to help them in whatever they need.” The Children’s Advocacy Center provides comprehensive services to enhance the quality of life for abused and neglected children ages 3-17 in Central Texas. Senior studio art and Spanish double major Ellen Buhrow realizes the importance of being at peace locally. “Normally, people think of war and peace, but (what)we’re doing here is more of a local peace. We’re helping kids who have really hard lives, so this goes towards helping them being able to have more...

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Reality of TV vs. real life professions

Everything on television these days is either over scripted or over dramatic. With today’s reality-based shows, it seems that the entertainment world is trying to get a better grip on reality, but what is the “real” reality behind all those over-the-top TV shows? When it comes to professionals such as policemen, nurses, or chefs, these are difficult to accurately personify on camera. The problem is  that they are serious occupations, but does TV take the right steps in portraying them as they really are? Cold Case, Blue Bloods, and Criminal Minds are only a few current shows featuring on-screen cops. But do these shows come close to the real life of an officer? Director of Public Safety and Chief of Police at UMHB, Gary Sargent, was actually led to his career by a TV show series called Adam 12. As an adult, he has become less involved in shows with police characters. Sargent said, “I have been doing this for 30 years, and there have probably been about two or three days of drama like you see on TV shows all combined together. Most of it is just daily doing the same things over and over again.” He explained that some people have been in law enforcement for many years and have never even had to draw their weapon. “It is kind of like being a fireman. When the bell rings, you have to be able to perform, but the bell does not ring that often. That is what it is no matter where you are at in your law enforcement career.What you see on TV is just not accurate portrayal.” Another profession that is seen frequenting the television screen is nursing. With shows like Grey’s Anatomy, Nurse Jackie, and HawthoRNe, nurses are on every channel. Coordinator of Health Services, RN Debbie Rosenberger, said, “Most of them are not portrayed very well. They show us not adhering to our scope of practice and not being very compassionate and pretty ditzy in a lot of them.” She adds that there are a few shows that portray nurses with morals and character, but not many. “I do take great exception when they portray us as not caring because nurses are held in one of the highest regards for our credibility and our compassion, and I dislike it when the media erodes that.” She said that nurses are supposed to be patient advocates and that she would like to be able to turn on a show where they act as such. Another on-camera profession that has grown in popularity is that of a chef. From shows like Hell’s Kitchen, Top Chef, and...

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New Farris apartments are student friendly
Sep13

New Farris apartments are student friendly

The construction on the new apartments has almost come to an end, and Farris Hall is currently housing students who seem to be satisfied with their surroundings. The structure is home to 163 students and sits behind where the new stadium is to be built. The apartments might seem far away, but they are as close to campus buildings as the other apartments. Resident Director Patty Wright said, “The students have been really excited about the apartments. They are really happy about the look of the apartments and the space of each of the rooms.” Wright explained the new landscaping for Farris. “It is going to be beautiful when it comes to the quad. There is a water feature that is going to be there, as well as greenery that is coming in.” Wright said, “The beautiful landscaping that UMHB does across the board will be done here as well and all around the front of the building also.” The outside of the apartments has not been completed, but Wright assures this will not be the case for long. “The new apartments are a good design with nicely sized bedrooms and closet space, open concept living and kitchen space, and the added benefit of not only having your own bedroom, but having your own bathroom as well.”   Donna Plank, associate dean of students and director of Resident Life said, “The location of the apartments provides a good setting in close proximity to the main campus and also provides some really great views. I think the students are going to enjoy living here.” On top of these added amenities, Farris will also feature several different ways to entertain occupants. “The building has some great features such as the fountain in the courtyard area,” Plank said. “Seating will be provided in the courtyard with tables and chairs, and there will be grills.There is a computer room and a really nice space that is being set up as a meeting/conference room.” Plank went into further detail about the new amenities residents will now be able to enjoy. “There will be a TV in the meeting room that will be Internet capable, so if a study group needed to access the Web, they could use the larger screen on the TV versus using their computers. On the fourth floor, we are creating a media room and have placed a 70” TV in that room along with blackout curtains for the windows. The furniture in that room will be a large sectional couch and two enormous body sacks for the floor,” she said. With many new places for students to study, there will...

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Stunt Night joins forces with Homecoming

It is the beginning of the school year and along with many long-time UMHB traditions picking up again such as football games and Homecoming, one more timeless Cru event is about to take place. Stunt night is coming Sept. 30 this year during Homecoming weekend at Walton Chapel. UMHB alumni will now have the opportunity to watch the skits put together by each class. Since Stunt Night is now a Homecoming event, the Homecoming court will be the hosts for the night. This will also give the campus a chance to get to know their nominees for Homecoming king and queen before voting. Tiffany Wurdemann, assistant director for student organizations and adviser for Stunt Night explained how groups will perform. She said, “Fifteen minutes will be given to each class to present their skit and dance, following the theme of their genre and ensuring that the skit is entertaining, fun and reflects the Christian values of this institution.” The four classes competing, will feature a skit and song to match the theme, Reality TV. Senior math education major Shaina Ryan is the program director. “Each class will have to incorporate two different genres of reality TV,” she said. From the broad category it will be broken down into subcategories such as wedding, dating, cooking, talent and fashion shows. There are two winning teams: the class choice and the judge’s choice. Practices have already begun, but it is not too late to participate. Check Facebook for your class group or ask a friend. Ryan said, “There is honestly a place for everyone: actors, directors, choreographers, musicians, promotions, backstage crew, ticket sales, audience. It is so easy to get involved with this event.” Stunt Night does not require auditioning, a nomination or even talent. “It is a chance to get together and laugh with your classmates and build friendships that you may have never had before,” Ryan said. Senior exercise sports science major Seth Dickinson enjoys the tradition of Stunt Night.  “I think it allows students to use their creativity, whether. … in dances, lines, or costumes,” he said. “It also is just fun to play a character different from yourself. Stunt Night just allows you to be something that you can’t be on an average day.” With the event right around the corner students will soon begin scripting their skits and making costumes. This is Ryan’s third year to participate, and she is looking forward to creating new memories, proud moments and sharing many laughs. She said, “Meeting new friends and getting to bond with them over ridiculous songs and dance numbers is something that doesn’t happen often on...

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