Male nurses learn to defy stereotypes

Men in the nursing field know how it feels to be the odd man out. After hearing some opinions from men in the nursing program, it is evident that it’s impossible to ignore the majority of women in nursing compared to men in the field. Junior nursing major Corbin Winkle explains the first time he experienced any tension in the nursing field with female classmates was during a viewing of a film called Perry Care.  The movie was an instructional  video on how to clean patients and administer care. Winkle said, “Having to watch that with girls on either side of me was pretty awkward. It’s a bit shocking. It goes away after a while, though.” Winkle also said he is one of only two or three other guys in most of his nursing classes, and several people call him and his fellow male nursing mates “murses.” The days of nurses being pretty girls in white dresses are quite over. The degree for a Bachelor of Science in Nursing is for both sexes. There isn’t a B.S. in Male Nursing. However, some may wish that there were. Junior nursing major Dan Black said, “A struggle is that you’re entering into a profession that has been dominated by women for many, many years. Currently there are about three million registered nurses in the United States and only about 6.2 percent are male, so that’s kind of what we’re going up against.” He said male nurses  bring great qualities to the table in the nursing field. “You’re going to get a lot of patients that aren’t exactly … light. Some men view this as bad because they feel that they’re the muscle in the job, but if I can help a fellow co-worker, then I’ll do that.” Many male nurses easily adapt to being around a large number of women because they all share a common goal  they are jointly working to achieve. Though they may come from different perspectives, it is still the same goal. Black said, “We take care of the patient not only physically, but we look at them as  needing holistic care, who they are and how they feel.” Black discuss the different mentalities both female and males bring to the field of nursing. “We do a lot of psychology with that. So the job description is the same, but men and women are just different, so, yes, we have the same job description, but sometimes I’m going to approach a situation differently just because I’m a male,” he said. One nursing student seems to run into the occasional problem of not even being identified as a...

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Twists to classics make opera a blast
Feb21

Twists to classics make opera a blast

The UMHB Opera performed Rita and Little Red’s Most Unusual Day Feb. 10. Music lovers gathered to watch the performance at the Cultural Activities Center in Temple. George Hogan, director of the UMHB opera/musical theater program, UMHB Opera Cru and an instructor of applied voice, directed the opera. The first performance was  a tuned-up version of Little Red Riding Hood, which was renamed Little Red’s Most Unusual Day by John Davies. The play was first performed by the opera students  to several thousand school-age children from the area for the Arts and Education Program put on by the Cultural Activities Center. Last semester, the Opera performed 10 shows in a week for the children. Freshman vocal performance major who played Little Red, Haide Gonzales, said, “My favorite scene to perform is when I realize my granny isn’t granny, but instead the Big Bad Wolf because the kids are more scared than I am. In fact, I loved every minute of it. When we did the production in the fall for the school district. It was amazing to see the kids get so into it. I loved when I had to say Dudley, the forest ranger (Ranger-Rover), ‘wanted to be mom’s boyfriend’ because the kids always thought it was so disgusting and openly expressed it.” An orchestra and a conductor were new additions that some of the cast had to adjust to. Sophomore vocal performance major, who played Mr. Bigbad (the Wolf) in Little Red and Gasparo in Rita, Josiah Davis said, “Working with the orchestra was definitely new because I have pretty limited experience working with an orchestra and following a conductor. I don’t think people understand how difficult it is to sing and act while you’re watching someone out of the corner of your eye who’s trying to tell you cues and stuff. So that was tough. By the time the performances rolled around, we got it together.” Rita by Gaetano Donizetti, is a play about an abusive wife who believed her husband, Gasparo, had drowned, while Gasparo thought Rita had died an unfathomable death as well. Beppe played by Matt Klepac is Rita’s new husband who puts up with her temper and abuse. Through a series of spectacular events, they all come face to face, and the laughs, exquisite sound and acting phone through. Junior vocal performance major who played Grandma Hood and Rita, Elizabeth Pasichnyk, commented on her most memorable moments performing Rita. The mood of the play holds much sarcasm when Rita antagonizes Beppe constantly by confessing her love for him and then snatching it right back. When he breaks a beloved porcelain cup, she...

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School organizations attend leadership conference in Dallas
Feb07

School organizations attend leadership conference in Dallas

Members of the Christian Association of Student Leaders joined together at Dallas Baptist University Jan. 26-28 for the annual conference that devotes three days to providing leadership insight for students in various positions of leadership at different Christian colleges around Texas. University Chaplain Dr. George Loutherback created the conference 14 years ago so growing leaders would be able to come from  Christian communities and learn more about becoming influential leaders in their area. Among the UMHB organizations to attend CASL were members from Campus Activities, Welcome Week, Student Government Association and Campus Ministries. The key speaker for the event was Tim Elmore. He wrote a book titled Habitudes, which teaches young students how to be authentic leaders. Director of Student Organizations Tiffany Wurdemann is on the executive committee for planning the CASL trips and hopes one day more students outside of school organizations who aspire to be leaders will be able to join in the events. Wurdemann said, “How can we continue to put others before ourselves and go the extra mile, from being on time and early, to honoring people in that way, to humbling yourself as a leader?” She continues to discuss the positive relationship between the staff and students. “As an administrator, that’s great when all your students want to do that. As a student, that’s great when your leaders above you what to serve you in that way,” she said. Part of the message of the conference was to encourage student leaders to choose wisely the number of responsibilities they commit to. Elmore spoke of being a river, not a flood. He compared students to being a flood if they are involved in too many things. They spend little time on them and end up being destructive, whereas, a student who is a river is effective and handles obligations appropriately. Student Body PresidentKassidy Harris returned to school with a mission of strenghtening relationships. He said, “At the end of CASL, you have college reflection, a time where you have your university come together and tell what you’ve learned. One of the biggest things from every single person in that room was that we wanted to come back and build a better community on campus and be reunited as a body of Christ. So we all broke up in our different sections, and we all prayed that it could be that way.” Harris and SGA have committed to start meeting weekly to pray for a revival and a stronger community on campus. While workshops and sessions were all a big part of CASL, attendees also heard a Phil Wickham concert and played games including a Family...

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Campus wide support for sanctity of life

Sunday, Jan. 22 marked another year of events recognizing the date when the American government began allowing women  the right to choose whether or not to keep their unborn children. It was also the anniversary of the famous Roe vs. Wade decision. Now, 39 years and more than 50,000,000 aborted babies later, this generation is a quarter less than what it could have been. It is during the spring semester that students and faculty begin to raise awareness to the ever-so-powerful political and social topic of abortion. This past Friday red flags could be seen across the quad, each flag symbolizing 50,000 aborted babies, enough placed in the ground to account for all 50 million. Students will duct tape their mouths honoring the unborn who could not speak for themselves, and a guest speaker will appear in chapel with a message about abortion. The passing of the sonogram bill in 2011 will be a major celebratory issue this year. It requires demands that every woman who enters an abortion clinic with intentions to have an abortion must first be shown a sonogram image of the child before any procedures take place. Statistics show that 70-80 percent of mothers who see the heartbeat of their unborn child decide not to go through with an abortion. With abortion being such a sensitive and controversial issue, University Chaplain and adviser of Cru for Life, George Loutherback, hopes that those who are pro-life will embrace it. He said, “I hope that people come away from this with a sense of conviction. Say, ‘I believe in this and I’m going to take a stand and I’m going to learn what I can.” With elections coming up, he wants students to become educated on this issue. Loutherback said, “I’m going to learn what I can about which political candidates are pro-choice and pro-life, and I’m going to use that as a bench mark of who I want to vote for.’ Be convicted enough to learn what you can so that you can take a stand and make a difference.” Between political talk about abortion and different opinions in society, it can be hard to pick one idea about abortion and stick with it considering the many beliefs that exist. But for one biologist, the issue  is all plainly spelled out. Chair for the Department of Biology Dr. Kathleen Wood,  said, “I just go with what I read and understand out of the scriptures. A human life starts at conception. There is no doubt about it that when you have an egg and a sperm come together, they produce life.” For anyone who has had an...

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Transfers pour into university
Jan24

Transfers pour into university

Every year, the university has around 300 transfer students from different campuses and walks of life. Some of them come searching for a better education than what they had experienced at their previous institutions, and some come for the specific things that UMHB offers. Normally in the fall, freshmen wave in and are introduced to the campus with Welcome Week, a dubbing ceremony and different chapel and university events set up especially for them. During the middle of the year, when some 150 transfer students are introduced to the campus, they have not been greeted in quite the same way until recently. Assistant Director of Student Organizations Tiffany Wurdemann explained that the need for a Welcome Week for transfer students became relevant to her when she created a survey and sent it out to 150 transfers. Twenty-five responded, saying they would be interested in learning more about campus life. From events including coffee houses and bowling trips  which are organized by Cru Cab, the transfers were able to enjoy their own mini-welcome week. They were invited to Vice President for Student Life Dr. Byron Weathersbee’s house for dinner and were also dubbed Crusaders. Wurdemann said, “The neat thing about that is they all brought their families, so it was very special.” Help for the event was provided by Cru Cab and the steering committee. Junior marketing major and logistics committee member Alex Ball explained that this year’s transfer students were able to get involved and meet other students by helping out in the local community. At one point during the Welcome Week for transfer students, they were able to help at the local Hope for the Hungry center by cleaning out storage space and general tidying up of the establishment. Ball said, “It was really great to work as a team, all working to further God’s kingdom through Hope for the Hungry. It was definitely a bonding experience among the transfer students.” Many of the students are former military members who have recently been sent back home and can now pursue an education. There is a smaller number of older adults and a greater  number of young adults transferring in from multiple community colleges. Wurdemann said, “When I ask people why they chose UMHB, I feel like it is a faith-based institution, and it is smaller. … They want that quality education, so that’s why they’re going to choose a college like UMHB.” Junior nursing major Kara Cornelio said, “The Welcome Week they have now for transfer students is a really good way to introduce transfers to the UMHB lifestyle. It introduces us to the school song and makes...

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