Forced to be a pedestrian

With new parking standards having been in place for several weeks now, and students calves shaping up, the situation seems to be coming along nicely. There still seems to be reluctance from students to ride the shuttle. This may have to do with the fact that students fear the route it takes may not suit their schedule. Every time I have been a guest on the shuttle, which is when I can possibly catch it since I really hate walking, the sweet driver has always been more than happy to take me to wherever my class is; all you have to do is ask. The end of the complaining from students about having to walk a few minutes to class on our quaint, scenic campus should soon happen. However, it’s easy to understand how students could be upset at the fact that commuters can park in parking spaces at dorms and apartments, but campus residents can’t park in their spaces at classes and in parking lots. I envy incoming freshmen who will come onto our pedestrian friendly campus and will not know it as ever being anything different. Since becoming a recent commuter myself, I can honestly say, I wish this had happened while I was a freshman.  I would have grown some thicker skin for the winter and some better leg muscles for the summer. In the past, resident students have been guilty of driving just a few blocks to class. If this new rule had been enacted sooner, students would have saved a lot of gas. With new lots coming soon, hundreds of more parking spaces will be opening up for commuters, students and visitors. The university’s goal is to move parking to the perimeter of the campus and have the core be pedestrian-friendly, highlighting the landscaping and well-kept architecture. Parking lots will be constructed along a relocated Crusader Way that will be moved to ensure students do not have to cross the busy roadway to get to class. A commuter parking lot will be constructed between 11 Avenue and the railroad track. King Street is going to be made into a pedestrian mall of sorts that will go beside the stadium and can be resourceful during events. Overall, the campus is going to shape up to be a pedestrian-friendly campus that will be so beautiful and easy to travel to class through that students won’t even mind the distance....

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Looking into the lives of student teachers
Mar27

Looking into the lives of student teachers

We all start out somewhere, and students who are to lead start out as a student teacher to gain as much knowledge and foresight as they can before graduating to teach on their own. Student teachers have a major that is out of the ordinary in that they get to spend their last semester smack in the middle of the field where they hope to obtain a job. Besides getting firsthand experience in what they will be doing on a day-to-day basis in their field, all level student teachers are able to explore their teaching spectrum from elementary school, middle school and up to high school. Senior exercise sport science major Logan Chaney said, “They say you should start writing a book when you start student teaching, and you really should because it’s just the one-liners, the stuff kids say it just catches you off- guard and it cracks you up, and that’s every day.” Chaney is currently student teaching at Belton Middle School and similar to many other student teachers, he is pleased to be gaining confidence and a feeling of comfort in the environment where he hopes to be working one day soon. Department Chair of Education and Director of Field Experiences Carolyn Owens said, “Our role is to prepare them so that they have experienced as much as we can prepare them for concerning what they’re going to see once they start teaching on their own, so they’re comfortable that they know how to do that and they’re ready to start.” Recent chatter about teaching jobs being scarce has some aspiring teachers feeling concerned about searching for jobs. Assistant Professor of education, Dr. Joan Berry does not think the job market is in any more peril than other professions in today’s economy. “We see things cycle in and out. I think that the teaching profession will probably be a good field over the next few years. I realize that the last couple of years we had districts that were in financial distress, and so it looked like we weren’t going to have as big of a market for teachers. Berry explains why there will be more availability offered to student teachers. She said, “What’s happening is that the baby boomers are retiring, and they’re starting now to retire in greater numbers.” Alumnus exercise sport science major Ryan Tamez moved to Fort Worth after graduating to have a better chance at finding teaching jobs. “After I finished student teaching, I have been experiencing some problems getting a job but the odds of finding a job are in my favor. Chaney thoroughly enjoys student teaching. He said, “I’m...

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Recycling makes difference on campus
Mar27

Recycling makes difference on campus

As spring approaches and flowers start blooming, critters begin to run around and the grass begins to turn a brighter shade of green. During the process of taking pleasure in these refreshing moments, students and society as a whole could take a deeper breath of gratification to know they helped keep the earth beautiful and clean by taking part in the recycling efforts available to them. UMHB students currently have a wider variety than ever of ways to participate in recycling. Plastic, aluminum, paper and cardboard receptacles are all available. Many are familiar with the tall, black plastic trash bins located around campus that have holes on the top of the lid with instructions for plastic or aluminum. There are also receptacles for cardboard behind the library, at Facility Services and by the bookstore. There are paper disposals in the dorms as well; these accept any color or texture of paper and students can bring it from home too. The Environmental Concerns Committee, which  founded the campus recycling program in 1991 recently broadened their bins to include plastic bottles as well. With many new soda machines and the large number of water bottles that students discard daily, this decision desires the involvement of the entire student body in conjunction with the other recycling methods. Director of Science Education Resource Center, and Chair of the Environmental Concerns Committee Dr. Darrell Watson said, “We have recycling containers in all of the living places on the campus in the dorms and apartments. While students are participating to some extent, I know they could participate a lot more,” he said. “A lot of students don’t even realize we have a program.” Watson explains that although it is difficult to form a habit, people should adjust their routine to think about where the nearest recycling container is instead of where the closest trash can is. Professor in the College of Nursing and faculty member on the Environmental Concerns Committee Dr. Aida Sapp said, “Reduce, recycle and reuse and just really think … could it be repurposed or re-gifted or recycled? Think about ‘Does that really have to go to the landfill?’” Freshman exercise sports science major Diop Johnson said, “I love to recycle… It’s good for the environment …  I’m doing something beneficial for the school.” Johnson adds, “I think a lot of people just think there is  someone that does the job of sorting plastic and cans at the plant…. I think that is where people are a bit uneducated about recycling.”...

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Windows show significance of faith
Mar06

Windows show significance of faith

The Manning Chapel Lectures focus on outstanding people in ministry who have massively impacted Christian society. They are the inspiration for the stained glass windows in the chapel. This past lecture Feb. 21 was on Anne Luther Bagby and the life she devoted to missions. A lecture will be given each semester until all four windows have been discussed. A full conference over Baptist studies is in the plans for next fall. The window in the chapel that is devoted to Anne Luther Bagby has details within the colorful stained glass that are not noticeable to most people. If looked at closer, an outline of Texas can be seen in memory of how Texas Baptists supported the Bagbys throughout their mission work. Anne Luther Bagby, whose father was president of the school, and her husband, William Buck Bagby, were the first Texas Baptist missionaries to minister in Brazil in 1881 and were the longest serving Southern Baptists in history. They spent 60 years making a family and ministering to the locals. Associate Professor of Religion at Baylor University, Dr. Rosalie Beck, was the keynote speaker for the February lecture and inspired many with her knowledge and understanding of Bagby’s life and her passion  for missions. Beck researches missionary history and has written on Bagby. She said, “To me, Anne Luther Bagby is an inspiration and role model. Yet, she is also very human. She reminds me that God uses who we are to accomplish His divine will …. Her life encourages me to be persistent in following God’s will and to never forget that, for a believer, sharing the Gospel should be as natural as breathing.” Beck has been interested in Bagby’s life since she did a short biographical sketch of her for the Journal of Texas Baptist History. Beck talked of Bagby’s calling to become a missionary at age 19, the hardships she endured losing four children to various tragedies and the joy she must have had to see five of her nine remaining children become missionaries to South America. College of Christian Studies Professor Dr. Carol Holcomb emphasized the importance of knowing Christian history. “Knowing our past is key to knowing who we are. Knowing the stories of the people who’ve gone before us gives us meaning and definition and … purpose,” she said. Babgy also has a personal tie to the university. Beck said, “Annie Luther was an educated young woman from Kentucky when she and her folks arrived in Belton to work at UMHB. Committed to becoming a missionary, she wasn’t sure how that would happen because the Southern Baptist Foreign Mission Board did not...

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University hopes to enlighten students about health care

Health Quest will kick off its thirteenth year of educating students and the community about wise self-care solutions on Friday, March 23. The Mayborn Campus Center arena holds the event each year, nearly filling capacity with more than 800 people last year. Local vendors like dentists, health education companies and skin care representatives join to show students the best ways to maintain their health. “The objective is to provide a variety of free health screenings and information because information is power. Information alone is not going to change your behavior, but if I give you, through the vendors, great resources and more data, if you’re ready to make a change, then I feel like I’m enabling you,” said Coordinator of Health Services Debbie Rosenberger, who heads Health Quest each year. In the past, students have been amped about free massages, door prizes and being able to learn about local health care providers. This year, the door prize will be a Kindle, provided by Montgomery Chiropractic. Senior nursing majors Melissa Wade and Kelsey Anderson are part of a senior nursing student capstone group that will be in charge of welcoming the participants and vendors as well as gathering supplies and heading the student-nurse blood pressure table at the event. “I’m excited about the wide range of things that will be there. Hopefully, there will be something there that everybody can be interested in or find beneficial to them,” Anderson said. “There will be everything from mental health, because every college student is stressed and tired, to learning more about nutrition.” Anderson also explained there will be injury evaluation, where UMHB trainers will be on hand to look over minor aches and pains students may have they wouldn’t normally visit a doctor for. Another thing that excites the nursing students and Rosenberger is the brand new driving simulator. Rosenberger said, “We are having a simulator for texting and driving. So, to folks who think they can really pay attention to the road, I would highly encourage them to come. I think this will be very eye opening to the fact that they aren’t as tuned in as they think they are.” There will also be some basic investing information. Rosenberger calls this “financial health.” Economic advisers will  provide information over basic investments. Glucose screenings, “fatal vision,” walking the line with alcohol, blood pressure, body fat testing, spinal screenings and exercise demos are a few of the many other things that Health Quest will feature. King Street in front of Mayborn will be closed due to construction. Health Quest attendees will need to park across the street from Mayborn behind Johnson. Or,...

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