Students ‘Reach Out’ to help community
Apr20

Students ‘Reach Out’ to help community

The University of Mary Hardin-Baylor participated in a local volunteer program called “Reaching Out” on Saturday, April 2. The annual event is a student-led program run by the UMHB Student Government Association that helps local businesses and families through service projects. Registration for Reaching Out began at 8 a.m. and projects were completed from 9 a.m. until noon. An estimated 350 students, staff and faculty volunteered on Saturday around Bell County. Students from the Belton Christian Youth Center had students helped set up a game room. CAB and other on-campus organizations helped build and deliver playhouses. Some students cleaned up the Belton park, and the Astra organization helped with the Heart Walk registration. Students also helped assist with projects that benifited organizations like Feed My Sheep, Hope Pregnancy Center, and Habitat for Humanity. “Community service doesn’t fit into one mold,” said junior, political science major, Brodie Cutts.“Service comes in all shapes and sizes, it doesn’t have to be just picking up trash. It can be getting together with your co-workers and building a playhouse for a little kid who might not get one otherwise.” Cutts helped build playhouses for military families with the Residence Life group and said that not only did he enjoy helping the needy families, but he also enjoyed working alongside his friends and co-workers. “We got to joke around and get to know oeach other in a relaxed environment, which is always good,” he said. Shelby Rogers, a sophomore psychology major worked with Circle K, First Year Council, and the Lion’s Club on cleaning up the Belton Park for a BMX trail. “My favorite part was seeing how different [the park] looked before and after.” Rogers said not only did they make the park sparkle but she and her group also found a ton of useful items they never expected to find. “We found a living room set and an artificial Christmas tree,” she said. “We also found clothes, more furniture, and a ton of tires.” The Campus Activities Board (CAB) also helped deliver the playhouses for military families. “It was so fun getting to see the little girl’s face light up as we took the playhouse out of the truck and placed it in her backyard,” sophomore marketing major, Emily Parker said. After delivering the playhouse, the group helped paint the structure for the family. “It was wonderful seeing this little girl have so much fun.” she said. Reaching Out has helped many businesses and families around Belton, Parker said. It continues to build strong bonds between the community and UMHB...

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Career Services prepares students for graduation
Feb16

Career Services prepares students for graduation

“Start Early, Be Prepared Get Noticed!” That’s exactly what Career Services can help graduating seniors do. College students are all here for the same thing; to get an education and gain experiences that will help them attain future jobs. Finding a job before graduation can be a difficult task, but with the help of UMHB’s Career Services, the process can be easier. Career Services helps students create resumes, make connections in the field they’re interested in, and assist seniors in finding full-time jobs directly out of college. “We feel career planning is a four-year activity and students need to take advantage of their college years to explore and confirm career paths,” said Don Owens, the director of Career services. Owens said that the four steps to succeed in finding a job are: completing an interest assessment as a freshman and then at the start of junior year, start your professional career resume right away, review it every month to add skills and experiences that will be required for field work, complete three different internships, and build connections and a network. Career Services offers workshops throughout the year in addition to eight job fairs: the Senior Etiquette Dinner, Speed Interview Events, Mock Interview Appointments, Employer Information Sessions, and Employer Campus Interview Days. The department also actively partners with the Belton Chamber of Commerce to aid in the Apprentice Belton Mentoring program, and the Alumni Association to bring the Fall Homecoming Alumni Career Connection BBQ. “We will also partner with the Social Work Program to host the first Social Work Expo on March 4 and with the Modern Foreign Languages Program for Spanish in the Marketplace roundtable.” Jobs offered through Career services include off-campus, part-time positions, internships, and full time jobs. These job opportunities could be anywhere from local, regional, statewide, national, or even international positions. “I’ve been multiple times and they’ve given me great advice. [Career Services] Made me feel more secure about getting into the field I’m going into,” said junior psychology major Scott Carter. Career Services offers a program called “Cru Connection” which is a university career management tool. Cru Connection is used to link students and alumni with employers. Owens suggests that students, if available, bring a current resume to the meeting, if they have one available. If students do not have a resume available, then the Career Services staff, will gladly assist the student in developing their professional resume. Career Services is located on the second floor of Mabee, room 202. They will take appointments or walk-ins. For more information, call 254-295-4691 or send an email to careerservices@umhb.edu. Students can also find the Career Services page...

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Overcome the struggle for a new you in the New Year
Jan28

Overcome the struggle for a new you in the New Year

The start of the New Year has people doing what they always do, making New Year’s resolutions. This means there’s more people in the gym and less people on Facebook, for at least the first few weeks of the year. But having and keeping a New Year’s resolution with an old schedule is a difficult task that many do not make time for. One common New Year’s resolution that often gets ditched before the first freezing temperature is getting active and going to the gym. Chase McGhee, a sophomore criminal justice major and elite level power lifter said getting in shape requires more than just a gym membership. “New Year’s resolutions are always great to get back to being healthy, but to truly be healthy and fit, it has to be a life style change. It has to be something that you do continuously,” McGhee said. Here are some tips to making and keeping those elusive resolutions. Write the resolution into your schedule. If your New Year’s resolution is an activity, writing it down as a reminder and working it into your schedule can greatly increase your chances of sticking with it. Planning ahead can help you stay on track and make sure it happens at the right time. Think of your resolutions as something important, that has to be done. By not replacing or scheduling over it, it can get done. Get your friends involved. Doing a group New Year’s resolution can help everyone stay accountable and on track. Not only does it get you active, but it also gives you time with your friends. Nobody wants to be embarrassed by giving up in front of others. Whether it’s going to the gym or emptying out your closet, friends can push you to keep at it. Done the right way, group resolutions can help achieve goals. Do not give up. According to Today Health and Wellness, “For some people, the healthy habits felt automatic after just 18 days — for others, it took 254 days.” Pacing and keeping yourself on track can help you succeed. If you are trying to save up some money, put the same amount of money aside every paycheck. It will continue to grow every month and will be rewarding in the end. Viranda Brooks, a freshman film studies major says her New Year’s resolution is “focusing on taking care of myself, growing spiritually and mentally, and just figuring out who I am.”   Start simple Make your New Year’s resolutions something you actually want. Overwhelming yourself with ones you don’t want to do or too many resolutions can lead to stress. Once you’re...

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Campus discusses concealed carry
Dec08

Campus discusses concealed carry

The university hosted an open forum on Nov. 19 to discuss Senate Bill 11. The Bill states that anyone who has a Concealed Handgun License can open carry on campus. It is mandatory for public universities, however for private universities it is optional. UMHB has the option to completely follow the bill, partially follow it, or disregard it completely. The university currently allows handguns on campus if you have a CHL. However, it must stay in your car. Dr. Steve Theodore, Senior Vice President for Administration & Chief Operating Officer, and Gary Sargent, Chief of Police, held the forum in the Isabelle Rutherford Meyer Nursing Education Center. The rules of the forum? Raise your hand, use the microphone, introduce yourself, and address the panel. “This is not a debate between you and us,” Theodore said. “The administration has no opinion on it right now. Please state your opinion clearly, be brief, and be respectful. We’re all adults here.” The forum started off with freshman social work major, Grace Scott, mentioning the CHL process and what she has observed. “My father is a CHL instructor. [The CHL students] are there to protect themselves and their families,” she said “I don’t think we should put a limitation on this law.” Indy Henderson, a DPT major, took the mic and brought up the topic of police response time. “The average time for the police to arrive at the scene is three to five minutes,” he said. “A lot of people can die in that time”. Dr. Theodore responded to the student’s concerns by explaining the police force evaluation process and the presence level of police on campus. “We always evaluate our police department. We have 24/7 security or police on campus. Now are we going to have a police officer in every building? Probably not. But we do like to evaluate.” Soon after, Colton Hendrick, a junior church music major asked about the current safety regulations regarding tasers and pepper spray. Mediator’s explained that the UMHB Police offer self-defense classes, and mace, stun guns and knives (depending on the size) are allowed on campus. Hope Herring, a mental health graduate student, and a survivor of the Fort Hood mass shooting in 2014, spoke up about her experiences and what she has learned from them. “I’ve been a CH holder for four years and in the military for six years. It is vital for Senate Bill 1 to be at UMHB. I am a survivor from the Fort Hood shooting. The entire incident took 15 minutes. Three were killed, 15 wounded. Out of the 16 people who were military trained, only two had...

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University adds historic home
Nov19

University adds historic home

It’s big. It’s red. And it’s a new addition to the University of Mary Hardin-Baylor campus. The Curtis Mansion, also known as the Miller-Curtis House, was built in 1902 by William Ray Miller and his wife Ida. The house was built after the good cotton years left the family wealthy. In its architecture, Queen Anne features are mingled with Shingle style, which were popular in the eastern U.S. during that time. The design included fireplaces in every room. Fine materials and detailing inside and out gave elegance to the structure, according to uncoveredtexas.com. In 1914, A. Lon and Cora (Lee) Curtis acquired the property. For the next 59 years, the Curtis family occupied the mansion, thus earning the name of the “Curtis Mansion.” In 1977, The Curtis House became an official historical landmark, and received a medallion and plate on site. The recent owners, Richard and Pat Dale, former UMHB alumni, have owned the house for over 30 years. Dr. Steve Theodore, Senior Vice President for Administration & Chief Operating Officer, said UMHB has maintained a good relationship with the Dale family over the years. “It’s a beautiful home, and they’ve kept it immaculate…it’s in great shape, even for an old home” When the Dale family decided it was finally time to put the house up for sale, UMHB jumped at the chance to own the home in September of 2015. But despite the university’s eagerness to own the property, there aren’t any big plans for the house quite yet. Theodore said the University felt it was important, given the location, to purchase it. “We’re looking forward to doing something with it. We want to keep the house and keep it in its beautiful condition, and show it off. It’s a great place.” Several years ago, a cluster of rooms were renovated in the Curtis Mansion, but overall it still needs some work. “The house will need some upgrades like the air conditioning and probably a new roof. We’ve got some work to do to the house, but it’s a beautiful home.” As UMHB prepares to work in the Curtis Mansion, they know that changes will need to be made in order to make it appropriate for University usage. “As we use it for an institutional building, we’ll have to get it ADA (American Disability Act) compliant,” Theodore said. “We’ll have to have ramps, or possibly an elevator.” Students and those who grew up in the area are excited to see the building become a campus facility. “As a child, my siblings and I would always talk about living in the house and what it would be like.” said...

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