Editor-in-chief bids farewell
Dec08

Editor-in-chief bids farewell

It has truly been a pleasure serving as editor of the campus newspaper, The Bells. It has been stressful, but mostly fun. I know that most of this would be impossible if it weren’t for the wonderful staff I’ve enjoyed working with this past semester, along with the students, faculty and staff that not only read the stories we write, but contribute to them as well. The last three-and-a-half years at UMHB have come and gone, and it honestly seems like a blur now as I am finishing my last week. I remember coming to my first journalism class, Introduction to Mass Media, in the fall of 2012 and hearing some wise words said by Mrs. Vicky Kendig, former journalism professor and newspaper adviser. She recited John 1:1: “In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God.” After that, she proceeded to encourage us journalism majors, telling us that God had journalists in mind when that verse was written, and that our jobs were to write the truth and remain true to ourselves as Christian journalists. Wiser words were never said and I have never been more influenced by a single individual than I have been by Mrs. Kendig. My journey on The Bells has been a rollercoaster, but I wouldn’t trade my experience for the world. From starting out my sophomore year as entertainment page editor, to adapting to a smaller staff and paper, to working with our new newspaper adviser, Mrs. McClure, and building our staff from the ground up, it has been hard. But it has been worth it. In my time as editor and working on the paper in general, I have learned what UMHB is really about. I’ve had the opportunity to see the very best of this campus and take in the beauty it has to offer. A lot of my thanks goes to the UMHB Communications department, whose faculty has not only taught me everything I know, but has also given this student-run newspaper the support it needs to succeed. I would like to thank every person who works in Heard Hall. Sharing this home has its ups and downs, and our chaos inevitably becomes your chaos, but you don’t let that stop us from producing the paper. Your patience with the newspaper and staff is really appreciated. Lastly, I don’t think I can go without thanking the newspaper adviser, Mrs. McClure, my assistant editor, Cody Weems and the rest of the staff and writers. All of the hard work we have put in this semester has not gone unnoticed, and I genuinely cannot...

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Adele says Hello after three years with new album
Dec08

Adele says Hello after three years with new album

Adele said “Hello” to fans in a new way on Oct. 23 when she released her first single from her newest album, entitled 25. The full-length album was released not long after the hit single on Nov. 20. The album was much anticipated since her last album, 21, came out more than three years ago. Adele is known for naming her albums after the age in which she draws her inspiration. Now, at 27 years old, she is showing the world her emotions from 25, and they are, for the most part, heart-wrenching. Her new album is somewhat different from 19 and 21. Adele has called it more of a “make-up record” to herself, that was inspired by the time she lost between albums. “My last record was a break up record and if I had to label this one I would call it a make-up record. I’m making up with myself. Making up for lost time. Making up for everything I ever did and never did,” Adele said in a Facebook post on Oct. 21. Though it is drastically different from her previous albums, it does not lack that signature Adele passion. This album was overall really great, but that doesn’t mean that every song on the track list was worth a repeated listen. In fact, some of the songs really blended together, even the really good ones. And while a lot of them evoked strong emotions, it wasn’t as bold as 21, which was disappointing to long-time fans. If you want songs that will mend your broken heart, because if we are being honest, that’s what we all thought the entire record was going to do, then skip to track four, “When We Were Young,” track eight, “Love In The Dark,” or track 10, “All I Ask.” These love-filled ballads are the songs fans were hoping would shine throughout 25. “River Lea” is a song with no real meaning or emotion. It might actually be the only song lacking Adele charm on the entire record due to its annoying repetition. “Send My Love (To Your New Lover)” was filled with a sound that was very unlike Adele. It was more of a happy, fun song which shows a different side of the Grammy-winning artist. This album wasn’t the greatest one put out by Adele. In fact, it isn’t really comparable to the boldness of 21. It was missing the vocal strength fans are used to. However, it does have some noteable songs throughout the record that are well-worth the buy. You can purchase the album on iTunes or at Walmart or Target. If you buy the album...

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Cru Culture: Tips to help you finish the semester
Nov19

Cru Culture: Tips to help you finish the semester

The end of the semester is upon us, and with that comes a lack of motivation for most college students. Thanksgiving break is coming up and the final weeks of school are just around the corner. Before we know it, final exams, presentations and papers will be due and we can enjoy our month-long Christmas break in peace. But before we can make our trek to our comfy beds at home, the familiarity of our hometowns and catching up with high school friends, we must keep our eyes on what’s important so that we can prevent going home and crying in our comfy beds because we failed the semester. You see the light at the end of the tunnel. It’s bright. But you can’t get to it by trading your responsibilities for temporary happiness. Christmas break is great, but you want to be able to enjoy the month-long intermission of recuperation to prepare for the spring semester. So, don’t neglect your work and priorities now, because you’ll soon regret it. There are just a few weeks left of school, Thanksgiving break excluded, and there are a few things that students should keep in mind for these last few weeks so that they don’t end up regretting their bad decisions of skipping classes and not turning in final assignments. Here are some suggestions: Don’t wait until the last minute to work on a final project or presentation or paper. Everyone knows that procrastination does not produce the best work, and most final papers and projects are worth a lot of a final grade. Figure out the grading criteria and topic of each assignment and start now, because odds are you won’t want to start it during Thanksgiving break when you’re with your family. Keep going to class. It’s tempting to want to skip the last classes, but that won’t benefit you in the long run. Professors like to sneak in final exam questions and information during the last few class meetings because not a lot of students show up. Professors also have the tendency to give review days to the class, when attendance is optional. Go to the review. Take notes. Don’t skip. Relax. The end of the semester comes with great stress, but if you worry about it, it will only become worse for your sanity. Take your time to do class work and don’t forget to take care of yourself. If you can remember these tips, then the last few weeks of school should fly by, and you can enjoy your Christmas holiday without that guilty feeling in the back of your...

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Cru Culture
Oct29

Cru Culture

Most college students value sleep, but because they are often pulling all-nighters, hurriedly writing forgotten essays or just hanging out with friends until the early hours of the morning, they don’t often get the rest they need. This lack of sleep makes students long for the days when naptime was a scheduled part of the day. To combat this sleep deprivation, students are making sure that they get some Z’s throughout the day, through 30-minute nap breaks between classes, catching a few winks in their vehicles, or skipping meal times to catch up on rest. If only there was a class you could sign up for that condoned sleeping and gave you credit for doing so. Sleep has become essential to the average college student, but it is costly. Carving out time for a quick nap has almost become a game. When can I nap? Where can I nap? How long can I nap? But seriously, if you don’t have a list of the most comfortable spots on campus to sleep, are you even playing the game right? One of the biggest fears in the napping world is over-sleeping. It isn’t the same as turning your alarm off for your 8 a.m. class and accidentally rolling back over and missing it completely. No, sleeping too long during your nap is a different kind of terror that everyone knows about. You wake up from a deep sleep in a dazed-and-confused state. Was that ten minutes or ten hours? But don’t worry, there are ways to prevent this. Freshman who have not yet mastered the art of napping should take notes. If you know you are going to be up late cramming for a test, plan ahead for your nap. Even if it’s a small cat nap, anything will help to keep you running until the end of your day. Another great tip is to set multiple alarms. When you’re in such a deep sleep for such a short period of time, it’s easy to confuse your alarm for something in your dream. And you don’t want to miss reciting the speech you prepared all night for. It is also important to not sleep in your bed. It’s so temping to do this because it’s comfy and it’s yours. But it’s a trap. This is where you’re used to sleeping for long periods of time. Just skip the routine all together and opt for the couch or even the floor (if it’s carpeted, of course). Naps are a privilege, so don’t take advantage of them. Follow these rules and guidelines so that your social and academic life can continue to thrive...

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Semi-colon Project brings mental health awareness to campus
Oct29

Semi-colon Project brings mental health awareness to campus

Mental illness effects everyone, whether directly or indirectly. Depression, PTSD, ADD and ADHD are just a common few that are widely known around America, but those who suffer from them often go untreated. The numbers of those undergoing treatment for mental illness has dramatically increased in the last few years, even though awareness of these issues has not increased. According to the Mental Illness Research Association, in 2015, approximately one in five adults experienced mental illness. But many of these people continue suffering because of the stigma associated with these types of illnesses. The UMHB counseling center is trying to end that stigma around campus and encourages anyone who has thoughts of suicide or hurting themselves to come to their offices and talk to one of the available counselors. Director of Counseling, Testing and Health servies, Nate Williams said “The reality of what it is in the rest of the nation can happen here. The same things that touch other places will touch us. Any small thing that we can do to try and raise awareness and then offer our services to prevent things like this from happening, that would be why we do it.” After months of researching the Semi-colon Project, a worldwide brand that shares people’s stories, Willams decided that it was time for the campus to start something similar. “The Semi-colon Project is mainly about suicide awareness… and the prevention of suicide. We learned about it, and we liked the emphasis it made. It’s an easy symbol, so when you see the semi-colon, you know what it’s about.” Williams’ main goal is to let students struggling with mental illness know there are resources available on campus. “There’s a real need to reach out on campus and to show people that we are here,” William’s said. “We want to reach out to those who are struggling with mental illness or just with another type of problem.” Senior social work major Morgan Matous used to struggle with severe clinical depression. She said that it was hard for her to reach out at first because not a lot of people realize its severity. “Depression is difficult to understand if you haven’t been depressed before, mainly because many people think you are just sad. [People would say] ‘maybe if you would just socialize more’ or ‘you have nothing to be sad for, you have a good life,’” Matous said. “For me, it was a feeling of hopelessness, shame, unworthiness and rage.” She said that it was hard to get out of bed most days, and she slept anywhere from 12 to 18 hours a day. She contemplated suicide and even...

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