Red shirt and chicken giveaway
Feb25

Red shirt and chicken giveaway

THE BELLS — The Quality Enhancement Plan committee gave away free lip balm, soda, candy and pens that promoted the QEP Writing Cru in the Mayborn Campus Center Feb. 14. T-shirts went to the first 500 people, and they will receive Chick-fil-A coupons if they wear the shirts Feb. 25 and 26. “The QEP is one of the key elements of reaffirmation of accreditation under the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS),” co-chair of the QEP committee Dr. Brian Brabham said. “The QEP describes a course of action taken by a university that enhances the quality of the education at the university and has student learning as its primary goal.” The committee conducted a contest in which students, faculty and staff were asked to submit pre-proposals to determine where the emphasis would be for education enhancement. “We wanted as much campus involvement as possible. We determined that having a contest with a monetary reward would probably draw the most responses,” Brabham said. “Two proposals that dealt with writing were chosen.” The submissions from Dr. Judy Trotti, professor of education and Dr. Jacky Dumas, professor of English, stressed the need to improve writing skills at the basic level and writing skills specific to an individual’s major. “Most businesses or companies lament the fact that graduates come out and they can’t write,” Dumas said. “We need to make sure that we’re able to give them a foundation of writing, so that when students leave, they’re able to go into that vocation with a degree of confidence in their communication skills.” Since spring 2011, the committee has worked on the Quality Enhancement Plan, which was given the name the Writing Cru by alumna Sarah Norrell and senior education major Jacquelyn Jackson. The Writing Cru desires to make students competent in a writing style that is necessary for their future professions. “Everybody does some sort of writing in some facet,” Dumas said. “One of the major components of the QEP is that each major will require two writing intensive courses within the degree pathway.” The addition of a writing center on campus is one of the tools the Writing Cru will use as it works to improve student writing. The center will be located in the Mabee Student Center along with the Center for Academic Excellence, Career Services and Planning and other organizations for student support. Trotti said, “The writing center will be an asset to students as a place where specialists in foundational writing and disciplinary writing can collaborate with students as they write papers, reports, essays and other...

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Award-winning coach takes opportunity to give back
Jan29

Award-winning coach takes opportunity to give back

THE BELLS — After being awarded ASC Coach of the Year eight times and receiving the title AFCA Regional Coach of the Year seven times, head football coach Pete Fredenburg received the award of Coach of the Year for Division III football from Liberty Mutual Insurance Jan. 6. “Coach Fredenburg’s on-the-field success speaks for itself, but to have an award like this recognize the work he does in molding young men and serving the school and community is a great honor,” UMHB sports information director Jon Wallin said. Along with a trophy, Liberty Mutual presents a grant in the amount of $20,000 to the university alumni association the coach is affiliated with and gives $50,000 to recipients for the purpose of donating the funds to a charity of the coach’s choosing. “It was great to reach out to these charities and an awesome thing for Liberty Mutual to do,” Fredenburg said. He donated $12,000 to the Ronald McDonald House Charities of Temple, Texas. The nonprofit serves as a haven where families with extremely ill children can find the simple comforts of home, such as a hot shower and a peaceful place to escape the constant noise of a hospital, during difficult times. “The very generous donation will help us make some much-needed repairs around our 27-year-old house,” Executive Director Susan Bolton said. “The 11-year-old system is showing its age. There are many not-for-profit agencies in Bell County, all worthy of support, but there is a finite amount of money available to help all of them.” The rest of the funds will be distributed to Belton’s Helping Hands ministry, the McLane Children’s Hospital and the Wounded Warrior Project. “I have had involvement with all these organizations, and they all do awesome jobs for our communities,” Fredenburg said. “These are the charities I chose, and the checks have been sent from Liberty Mutual.” Candidates who receive this award are honored for their demonstration of responsibility, integrity, sportsmanship and excellence both on and off the field. “Coach Fredenburg is very deserving of this honor, for his work off the field and in the community as much as for what the Cru has done on the field,” Wallin said. “He has always had our student-athletes involved on campus and in community service because he understands how important those things are in forming good people and good leaders.” Fan voting decides the top 15 coaches from each NCAA division, and then an objective scoring model determines the top five finalists for Division III coaches. “My time at Mary Hardin-Baylor has been incredible,” Fredenburg said. “My success has been because I surround myself with great,...

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New Miss MHB crowned
Nov20

New Miss MHB crowned

Pageant. “You hear that word, and it’s kind of a negative connotation of like a Toddlers & Tiaras type thing,” junior public relations major and contestant Andrea Hale said. “But the Miss MHB pageant is so different because the focus isn’t on outer beauty. It’s more focused on personal growth.” When the crown was placed on the head of the 2014 Miss Mary Hardin-Baylor, senior music major Linny Mitchell, everyone in attendance learned how important and inspiring personal growth really is. Her talent was singing a mix-up of the songs “Titanium” and “Stay” while playing the piano. She is now focusing on enacting her platform of strengthening faith in family crisis. “I’ve learned so much through my own personal struggle that I’ve gained a serious desire to help others going through similar suffering,” she said. “I’m going to expose my own self. I’ve learned if you share, you can move on. If you hold it in, you can’t.” Using the analogy of a seed to represent how difficult situations can lead to positive outcomes, Mitchell has plans to reach all age groups as she implements her platform and tries to make a lasting impact on the community. “I’m trying to cover the whole spectrum because family crisis affects everyone,” she said. “There’s a huge majority of people who’ve suffered … but no one’s open to talk about it because they feel embarrassed. I want to just be open.” Miss Freedom Movement Lauren Ribera won first runner-up. Miss Junior Class Kayla Upshaw took second runner-up, followed by Miss Senior Class Alyssa Martinez and Miss Cru for Life Kelsey Kunk. Audience members were captivated each night by the 24 young women who competed in the pageant Nov. 8-9. Inspired by the encouragement from Matthew 5:16 to “let your light shine before men,” this year’s theme was Lumiere, meaning light. “It was an opportunity to embrace shining,” Hale said. “We may all be shining our lights in different ways, but we were all coming together for one purpose, which was through the weekend we wanted to glorify God.” Pageant is a seven-week commitment in which contestants represent a campus group or organization. Participants compete in four categories: evening gown, talent, platform speech and interview. “It will test you in the way you think about yourself and the way you present yourself to others,” senior Christian studies/art major Naomi Flores said. “Also, it’s the struggle of submitting yourself to Christ and saying ‘Lord at the end of the day, no matter where I rank, will I trust you in this.’” The first night audience members and judges heard the participants’ platforms and saw...

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Spanish Club celebrates Dia de la Raza
Nov06

Spanish Club celebrates Dia de la Raza

Colorful paper decorations hung from the ceiling. A festive photo booth sat outside the CAB office and lively cultural music played as the Spanish club celebrated Dia de la Raza in Mabee Student Center. “Spanish Club is just a group of people that are excited about Spanish and its culture, and are ready to celebrate it together,” senior Spanish major and president of the Spanish club, Kaitlyn Roberts, said of the Oct. 26 event. “We do activities together that are fun, and we get to learn more about the culture.” Dia de la Raza, also known as El Encuentro, is translated as the “Day of the Root” or “The Finding.” People in the Latin American and Hispanic culture honor Christopher Columbus’ discovery as an event that caused people of different races to interact and develop new relationships. “We make a party,” freshman psychology major Josseline Reyes said. “It’s something happy for us, even though the situation was sad.” In the United States, Columbus Day commemorates the travels of the Italian explorer and his discovery of the New World. While Columbus’ excursions brought disease, destruction and death to the land, members of the Latin American culture still celebrate the positive influences of the 15th century exploration. “It was kind of a discovery of a whole bunch of races and mixtures because there were so many people intertwining,” senior psychology major Kyoko Clark said. “It’s interesting to see ultimately now where we’re at—all the different cultures, and how so many people are mixed with different backgrounds.” To give other students the opportunity of participating in the Operation Christmas Child fundraiser led by the Spanish Club, toys and monetary donations were accepted in exchange for entry tickets to the party in the SUB. “That’s the key to it; we’re trying to get people motivated to give,” Roberts said. “In November, we’re going to be packing boxes and giving them to Operation Christmas Child.” The event served as a way for the public to be included in the activities of the Spanish Club and learn about an important holiday for the Latin American community. “Culture is so rich,” Roberts said. “This day is probably one of our biggest events throughout the year just because it’s incorporating people not in the club.” Organization members provided a variety of cuisines from different Spanish-speaking countries. Dancing instructors from In the Mood Ballroom and Dance Studio, located in Temple, taught guests salsa, merengue and other Latin-inspired dance moves. A Day of the Dead memorial displayed pictures of American pop star Selena surrounded by decorative skulls and flowers. “So many people don’t want to speak Spanish or embrace...

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Sheldon Jones Returns for One Last Year
Oct22

Sheldon Jones Returns for One Last Year

The Cru’s basketball lineup will have a valuable asset back in the action this season with the return of center Sheldon Jones. “Now it’s your senior year, and you know that after this year you’re not going to play again,” said Jones, a senior organismal biology major. “That’s what’s been on my mind lately. A lot of people really don’t notice that until it’s too late.” Jones approaches this basketball season with more urgency for making every moment count after tearing his right Achilles tendon last year at a scrimmage against the University of Dallas. “It was right before our first home game,” he said. “I thought somebody just kicked me at first. That’s what it felt like, and I tried to get up but I just couldn’t move my foot at all.” The team created new defensive strategies to compensate for the unexpected loss of its 6-foot-10-inch  center. As his teammates fought their way to the Division III National Championship, Jones directed his attention to recovering and passing his finals that were soon approaching. “The priority for me was my grades,” he said. “I really couldn’t mope around. I had other stuff to worry about. I had homework, and then I had to go to rehab. You have to take it day by day, and do what you can.” NCAA regulations allow student athletes to participate in a collegiate-level sport for a maximum of four years. Because Jones’ injury caused him to miss his senior year of the official basketball season, he was granted one more year of eligibility. And he plans to make the most of his last year. “To get Sheldon back is huge in my opinion. We now have that height down in the post, which helps the guard play which overall helps the team,” sophomore biology major Layton Zinsmeister said. “Sheldon is a hilarious guy who is always positive. He is also a great leader.” The process to appeal for Jones’ fourth year of eligibility was a team effort. The NCAA requested specific paperwork and documentation, and then it took nearly four months for them to confirm. “UMHB athletic department compliance officer Darla Kirby was terrific in getting the paper work complete, correct and filed on time that the NCAA required,” Head Coach Ken DeWeese said. “UMHB athletic trainer Amanda Riley was attentive and worked exhaustively getting the information necessary compiled and in correct order, and Dr. Derek Lichota was extremely helpful and patient in his role as UMHB’s medical officer.” Jones continues to strengthen his body for the upcoming basketball season. Working through intense team practices is another stepping stone he hopes to...

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