New manager brings changes
Sep28

New manager brings changes

Published in the Sept. 28, 2016 issue of The Bells In the few years that Bawcom has been open, there have been vast changes to try and appeal to the comfort and accessibility of the students and faculty. The new building, a building, which opened in 2014, was not only closer to/attached to the stadium, but also more spacious and allows for more people at one time to study and hang out. Former golf coach Mr. Doak Flemming has been the assistant director of Bawcom for the past year, and is seeking to make Bawcom even better than it already is. “You know, taking over a brand new building, there’s not a lot of changes. The building had only been open a year when I took over, and so we’re looking to make some improvements, such as furniture. We’re working on a project with that,” Flemming said. “We’re consistently working with food services to improve quality, cleanliness, and those kinds of things. Aesthetically, we work with the design team of the university to see if there’s anything we can add to the building. Flemming is working on a project with the Physical Plant to possibly create storage for items such as skate boards and scooters, seeing their vast popularity around campus. Many students come to Bawcom to study or eat with friends. “Bawcom is where I come to study,” freshman pre- physical therapy major Bryan Buckberry said. “It’s nice to know that someone is looking to improve what’s already a pretty nice place.” Students congregate on all three floors of the building, and are excited to see changes. “I think new furniture would be amazing,” Buckberry said. “I’m in here all the time and I know that comfier furniture for the first floor would make it easier to stay for longer periods of time and study.” Flemming also said that he has worked to make the building only accessible to students and faculty during football games. Being selective about who enters Bawcom allows students who need to study to still feel included in the football experience. These changes have not gone unnoticed, and many have taken advantage of the opportunity to stay inside the building. In the two years it has been open, Bawcom has become a local favorite, a building both accommodating and appealing on the inside. And if Flemming has anything to do with it, it’ll only continue getting...

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Misrepresentation on campus
Sep28

Misrepresentation on campus

Published in the Sept. 28, 2016 issue of The Bells In the last year, there have been numerous events surroundng people of color. From the deaths of Terrence Crutcher and Philando Castle to the brutal murder of teachers and students in Ochoa, Mexico who were asking for a better education reform, to Donald Trump‘s degradation of Muslims and Hispanics. Although these event’s are hot topics for American citizens, they seem to pass under the radar here at our university. It feels as if the community of minorities go unrepresented. As a Hispanic woman attending this university, representation means a lot to me. Learning about events such as what happened in Ochoa, or the Black Lives Matter Protest in Charlotte, North Carolina, I expect fellow classmates to feel the same pangs of confusion or hurt that I do, or to at least care to discuss them. Unfortunately, it seems as though these conversations I seek only happen in passing; a name thrown out here, disapproval there. The conversation only goes as deep as conservative values allow, and that doesn’t seem very far. What many of my classmates do not understand is that these names represent so much more than just the unjust system we are under. These names and places represent me. And as a student at this university, I should have the privilege to feel represented like everyone else. The university is a predominantly euro-centric and conservative community, which explains a portion of the reason minorities feel unrepresented. But the school has so many various groups of people (such as the international students) that make up a large part of our community, yet they seem to be disconnected from the larger university population. The Association of Black Students is gaining a lot of speed here on campus, and their main focus is to bring more culture here. The Association has been invited to attend events at Baylor, due to the lack of interest of hosting these events on our campus. Just last week, a peaceful protest was held in front of Bawcom for students in support of the Black Lives matter movement. So how do we fix things? How can we, as a campus, include everyone into the conversation and make sure everyone feels properly represented? Start a conversation. Around campus, it shouldn’t feel wrong to have an open conversation about social issues. Being open about the ideas that others possess can impact us as a community. Host events and seminars. Learn how to be an actual inclusive group. This is how things will change. By sitting and doing nothing, we leave a whole community of people without a...

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Judicial system fails sexual assault victims

Published in the September 14, 2016 issue of The Bells Three months. Three months is how long it takes Mercury to orbit the sun, how long it takes to get over a broken heart (scientifically speaking), how long it takes to create a new habit, and how long we get for summer vacation. Three months is approximately 90 days, 2190 hours, or 131,400 minutes. Three months is NOT a long time. And yet, according to our judicial system, three months is enough time for rapist Brock Turner to learn his lesson. Given the name “Stanford swimmer” in the news, each article contained a picture of a smiling young man, seeming to be an upright citizen. On January 17, Turner took advantage of a girl who was intoxicated, assuming that her lack of a voice was consent. After what his father called “20 minutes of action out of his 20 plus years of life,” Turner left the girl when two students approached. The two men then chased and apprehended Turner when they realized the girl was unconscious. Since then, the case has turned into a circus. After an eye-opening and very personal statement from the victim, much of America watched in horror as the proceedings continued on. Hoping for the longest sentence for such a crime we watched as the media portrayed Turner as an innocent kid, who had simply made a mistake. Butthat is not what he is. On pins and needles leading up to the final decision, I strongly opposed leniency for Turner. How could one use the excuse of intoxication as to why they “messed up” when no consent had been or could have been given? And yet, as I watched the proceedings, I continue to see a picturesque depiction of him as the typical “stand up guy.” And while all that happened over the course of this summer, it seemed as though he was the only one depicted in such a manner while his crimes were far more severe than others portrayed in the media. And when the judge’s final judgement came out, I lost my breath. I lost my breath for every victim, every mother and daughter and sister out there that had ever felt the emotional sting of sexual assault. He was given just six months of jail time, because Turner was “just a kid.” And then as if that wasn’t bad enough, Turner was let out three months early because of “good behavior”. And here I am, like all other media outlets, focusing only on Turner himself. What about other victims who are too scared to come forward, who are now being shown...

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Cru football makes final preparations for the 2016 season

Published in the Aug. 24, 2016 issue of The Bells Fall weather is the beginning of many things: cooler weather, flannel shirts, and football. The team has been practicing since late this summer, honing their skills and preparing to make a run at the championships. “We play three teams ranked in the top 25,” says Head coach, Pete Fredenburg. “..so it gives us a great opportunity if we can win those games. It’d be really special, but we also know its a huge challenge. We’re just trying to maximize their potential.” Strategically, Cru Football plans to open up their offense. The key to this move is their wide receivers, whom Fredenburg has said are “very talented.” “We’ve got to put the ball into their hands,” he said. Defensively, Fredenburg is looking for consistency and a more aggressive approach to covering their opponents. Cru football is notorious for being exceptionally good, but that doesn’t mean the boys don’t work for their wins. “It’s a grind everyday,” said sophomore running back, Braden Murphy. “It’s just like having a [real] job. It’s like anything else in real life, it teaches you a lot of discipline. You [have to] get up every morning and be ready to give your best.” Sophomore quarterback Holten Einkauf said the team isn’t satisfied with average. “If you’re satisfied with average, then that means you aren’t willing to get better,” Einkauf said. Everyday you wake up, and you want to get better and better than the day before. Once you realize that, you’ll be successful.” Fredenburg mentioned several players worth keeping an eye on this season. “Blake Jackson is going to be our starting quarterback, and I think he’s developed into an outstanding player and leader. It’s been fun to watch him grow and develop. He also mentioned that junior linebacker Matt Cody has also established himself as a real positive leader. Fredenburg thinks both will represent the program well.” Fredenburg is going into his 19th season with the university, and hopes that being here has left a lasting impact on his players. “I think they’re very dedicated to this program and to the team and the university, and that’s the special [thing] about playing here. The guys really take a lot of pride in representing the school and doing it in a real special way,” Fredenburg said. Our boys uphold the tradition of faithfulness and devotion, both on and off the field, giving school spirit to all they encounter it. Coming off of an impressive 11-2 record in the 2015 season, the boys of fall are back in action on Sept. 3 facing off against Ohio Wesleyan...

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Crusaders build playhouses for military families
Apr20

Crusaders build playhouses for military families

The beginning of April brought not only April showers in preparation for our May flowers, but also CAB’s Cru Playhouses for military families. Each year, mulitple associations around campus make a playhouse for military families. The event was done the weekend before Reaching Out, in conjunction with the service event, and continued throughout the week. Students delivered the houses at the end of the week and then painted them with the families. This event not only benefits those receiving the playhouses, but those working on the projects as well. Each year, the event draws out both positive vibes and great times, for the participating families and students. “Cru Playhouse’s is something we do every year at the Campus Activities office,” said Victoria Fae, a senior cell biology major. “We purchase 10 to 12 playhouses every year, and different organizations sponsor each house.” Fae explained that the organizations help military families not only off campus, but also those on campus as well. “We build [the houses] during the whole week with the organizations. During the week leading up to [Reaching Out] we deliver the playhouses,” she said. Fae has participated in building playhouses since her freshman year. She enjoys impacting so many military families. “My favorite part is delivering the houses that Saturday with my organization,” Fae said. “It’s just really fun to decorate with them and meet the children, play with them, and give them something that’ll last for a long time.” The children that receive the playhouses get to play and hang out with the UMHB students and volunteers while they were painting the houses. Often times, the military families recieving the houses are also UMHB students. The playhouses are given to military families as an appreciation and gratitude gift from the school. “My favorite part was building the houses,” said freshman marketing major, John Merritt. “We build houses for the kids so that they can have fun and use their imagination.” This serves as a time for fellowship within the community and the campus. It brings students closer together with those currently serving in the military and those who are no longer...

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