Men’s golf team dominates competition
Oct26

Men’s golf team dominates competition

Published in the Oct. 26, 2016 issue of The Bells Ranked number two in the nation with fewer than ten players, the men’s golf team has been busy making a name for themselves. Led under Coach Jordan Cox, the men playing under the title have been recently ranked as the second leading team in the nation. The team is rooted in good values and hard work ethic, priding themselves on knowing each other’s weaknesses and strengths. “I think it’s helped that we’re all so close now,” said senior engineering major, Jarrod Brown. “It’s helped us to push each other. When we slack off or don’t try hard as individuals, it hurts us as a team. So being able to push each other and work together has played a major impact in our success. “ Leading first out of 13 teams in our own UMHB Fall Invitational, second out of 14 teams in the Al Jones Memorial and fourth out of 18 teams at the NCAA Fall Preview, the team has been out for the kill since the beginning. “It’s all about practice,” said junior communications major, Zach Daroowala. “Practice really does make perfect. It helps us to see what improvements we need to make. And when we compete, we see how others play, and it helps us figure out how to make ourselves better players.” As far as national success, the team has made a name for themselves there as well. The team has racked up countless titles and high rankings over the years, and dominates the competition at every turn. The team continues to strive for even more achievements by practicing constantly and improving their already successful...

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Interesting Places to go around the Central Texas Area

Published in the October 12, 2016 issue of The Bells Around campus, it seems as though students are left doing the same old same thing. From movies to going to the lake, to bowling, students are faced with ultimate boredom and longing to go home to do something new. But there are things around the Central Texas area that many don’t know about that could keep locals entertained all year around. 1. Local Pumpkin Patches With the fall season embracing Texas with its slight change in leaves and light breeze, pumpkin patches and Christmas tree farms will be popping up all over. Locally, we have a few pumpkin patches open for business, The Robinson Family Farm and Silo Christmas Tree Farm. They each have various attractions, including mazes and hot chocolate. And theri pictureesque surroundings make them great places for perfect photo ops. 2. Topsey Exotic Ranch In Copperas Cove, this drive-through safari includes various animals ranging from deer to giraffes. For 10 dollars a person and 1 dollar per bag of feed, it’s a great way to spend a day. But be warned, the animals can be quite large, and the trail is quite long. So go with a full tank of gas and preferably in a large vehicle or truck. 3. That Art Place/Arusha’s Looking for an experience closer to campus? That Art Place in Belton or Arusha’s Coffee Shop are great to visit. That Art Place is a local art studio where patrons can take art classes to learn how to paint canvases, work with glass, and paint pottery such as mugs and figurines. These items will be glazed and fired for you and available within a couple of weeks, and will be food and drink safe. Arusha’s is a great hangout if one is looking for somewhere to chill out and listen to some local bands and drink something locally-brewed. 4. Drive-In Theater In Gatesville, for a small fee of 10 dollars per carload, a group can see a movie and enjoy popcorn from the comfort of their car. New releases are shown and the theater is open seven days a week, featuring two movies a night. There are many hidden treasures around the Central Texas area that students have yet to discover. So keep these in mind the next time you feel the need to venture off campus looking for fun and...

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Feminism: more to the word than we think

Published in the October 12, 2016 issue of The Bells Feminism—a word that sends men running and women rolling their eyes. The word was created in the 60s and 70s, during a time when women wanted equality. But since its birth, feminism has elicited a rather negative conotation, even though it means great things. Feminism, you see, is more than not wanting a man to open a door for me or “the death of chivalry.” Feminism, by definition, is the advocacy of women’s rights on the grounds of political, social, and economic equality to men. Women in America seem to forget that we make up the majority of the population. As one of the 63% of women aged 16 and up, I know we can make a change if we stand together to make it happen. A unified front could bring about so much change like closing the wage gap. Women get paid less for the same job a man does for the simple fact that their genitalia is different. Being a descendant of various ethnicities increases said gap even further. But even in best case scenarios every woman makes 78 cents to the Euro-centric man’s dollar. Now, I’m all for sugar and spice and everything nice. But when faced with this information, I’m left wondering, where oh where, did my 22 cents go? But feminism is for more than just American women. Feminism is for women across the globe, young and old, who have been treated unjustly. There are young girls in other countries without the proper education they desire because educating women is deemed unnecessary. With the growing number of female college graduates here in the States, it’s a wonder why more educated women haven’t taken up arms for social change when it comes to our foriegn sisters. Lastly, feminism is important due to the rape-culture we have grown up in. When it is not okay for a woman to go topless in public, but it’s okay for a man to buy a magazine of a topless woman on any corner, there is a problem. Women are seen as a commodity, we are mocked for the anger attributed to our menstrual cycles, we are asked not to wear anything that might provoke an attacker, and young girls are married off at unspeakably young ages.  This is what feminism is for. Feminism is for equality. It’s for the equal treatment of women, not only here, but everywhere. But the stigma associated with being a feminist holds a negative connotation. When I tell a date that I believe in the equal treatment of women, suddenly men see that as...

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New manager brings changes
Sep28

New manager brings changes

Published in the Sept. 28, 2016 issue of The Bells In the few years that Bawcom has been open, there have been vast changes to try and appeal to the comfort and accessibility of the students and faculty. The new building, a building, which opened in 2014, was not only closer to/attached to the stadium, but also more spacious and allows for more people at one time to study and hang out. Former golf coach Mr. Doak Flemming has been the assistant director of Bawcom for the past year, and is seeking to make Bawcom even better than it already is. “You know, taking over a brand new building, there’s not a lot of changes. The building had only been open a year when I took over, and so we’re looking to make some improvements, such as furniture. We’re working on a project with that,” Flemming said. “We’re consistently working with food services to improve quality, cleanliness, and those kinds of things. Aesthetically, we work with the design team of the university to see if there’s anything we can add to the building. Flemming is working on a project with the Physical Plant to possibly create storage for items such as skate boards and scooters, seeing their vast popularity around campus. Many students come to Bawcom to study or eat with friends. “Bawcom is where I come to study,” freshman pre- physical therapy major Bryan Buckberry said. “It’s nice to know that someone is looking to improve what’s already a pretty nice place.” Students congregate on all three floors of the building, and are excited to see changes. “I think new furniture would be amazing,” Buckberry said. “I’m in here all the time and I know that comfier furniture for the first floor would make it easier to stay for longer periods of time and study.” Flemming also said that he has worked to make the building only accessible to students and faculty during football games. Being selective about who enters Bawcom allows students who need to study to still feel included in the football experience. These changes have not gone unnoticed, and many have taken advantage of the opportunity to stay inside the building. In the two years it has been open, Bawcom has become a local favorite, a building both accommodating and appealing on the inside. And if Flemming has anything to do with it, it’ll only continue getting...

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Misrepresentation on campus
Sep28

Misrepresentation on campus

Published in the Sept. 28, 2016 issue of The Bells In the last year, there have been numerous events surroundng people of color. From the deaths of Terrence Crutcher and Philando Castle to the brutal murder of teachers and students in Ochoa, Mexico who were asking for a better education reform, to Donald Trump‘s degradation of Muslims and Hispanics. Although these event’s are hot topics for American citizens, they seem to pass under the radar here at our university. It feels as if the community of minorities go unrepresented. As a Hispanic woman attending this university, representation means a lot to me. Learning about events such as what happened in Ochoa, or the Black Lives Matter Protest in Charlotte, North Carolina, I expect fellow classmates to feel the same pangs of confusion or hurt that I do, or to at least care to discuss them. Unfortunately, it seems as though these conversations I seek only happen in passing; a name thrown out here, disapproval there. The conversation only goes as deep as conservative values allow, and that doesn’t seem very far. What many of my classmates do not understand is that these names represent so much more than just the unjust system we are under. These names and places represent me. And as a student at this university, I should have the privilege to feel represented like everyone else. The university is a predominantly euro-centric and conservative community, which explains a portion of the reason minorities feel unrepresented. But the school has so many various groups of people (such as the international students) that make up a large part of our community, yet they seem to be disconnected from the larger university population. The Association of Black Students is gaining a lot of speed here on campus, and their main focus is to bring more culture here. The Association has been invited to attend events at Baylor, due to the lack of interest of hosting these events on our campus. Just last week, a peaceful protest was held in front of Bawcom for students in support of the Black Lives matter movement. So how do we fix things? How can we, as a campus, include everyone into the conversation and make sure everyone feels properly represented? Start a conversation. Around campus, it shouldn’t feel wrong to have an open conversation about social issues. Being open about the ideas that others possess can impact us as a community. Host events and seminars. Learn how to be an actual inclusive group. This is how things will change. By sitting and doing nothing, we leave a whole community of people without a...

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