Mannequins bring nursing building to life
Feb15

Mannequins bring nursing building to life

“If you build it, they will come,” quoted the Dean of the College of Nursing Dr. Sharon Souter at the dedication and ribbon cutting for the school’s newly built nursing education facility. And while the grand structure bears little resemblance to a baseball field, the words appear to ring just as true for the Isabelle Rutherford Meyer Nursing Education Center, as a mass of students, faculty, staff, administration and members of the community gathered Feb. 8. “People will come here,” Souter said. “They’ll come to see how we do nursing education.” At more than five times the size of the program’s former facility, the new center boasts 77,000 square feet of space, filled with classrooms, labs, a chapel and a state of the art simulation hospital unit. The building is part of the Campus Master Plan, which was approved two years ago by the university’s board of trustees and represents their vision to become the university of choice for Christian higher education in the Southwest. President Dr. Randy O’Rear said at the ceremony, “Through our planning process, we identified that we needed a new facility that would not only allow our program to grow, but a facility where new technologies and the best practices could be implemented to continue our rich tradition of producing the highest quality nurses.” Two years after the university’s board of trustees approved the master plan that included the center, it stands completed and fully funded. The lead gift for the project was given by the Paul and Jane Meyer Family Foundation and was named for Paul’s mother, who was a nurse and an educator. “The journey to this fabulous dedication has been a fun one, and one where we have seen the hand of God all throughout the process,” O’Rear said. From the program’s roots in 1904, to the first 28 students enrolled in the Scott & White College of Nursing in 1968, to today, O’Rear said that the university has established itself as a leader in nursing education in the country, a legacy he hopes will continue with the new building. “This is a grand celebration, and we have a bright future,” O’Rear said. “Praise God from whom all blessings flow.” Senior nursing major Anna Burnstad expressed her sentiments and those of her classmates at the dedication. She said that nursing is more than merely a field of study. “It’s a calling from God himself,” she said. “The purpose of that calling is to touch other people’s lives in real ways. We feed the hungry, clothe the naked, comfort the lonely, rejoice in wellness, and most importantly, we heal the sick.” Burnstad believes...

Read More
Love endures winding road to recovery
Jan29

Love endures winding road to recovery

Less than a month after her boyfriend’s deployment to Afghanistan, a Facebook message brought junior political science major Loren Cowan news she didn’t expect to receive during a day at the mall with her mom. He was wounded. “I literally fell to the ground and was crying,” she said. “That’s all I remember.” Cowan met Spc. Michael Crawford in October 2011 through a friend, sophomore social work major Maelee McCalley. “They just connected,” McCalley said. “There was something about the other that they were drawn to.” In December, just weeks into Crawford’s deployment, a roadside bomb struck the vehicle he was traveling in, killing three, and leaving Crawford with a severe injury to his spinal cord, which threatened his mobility. Though Cowan received word from Crawford’s father, she knew little of his condition or what could be done. “This was all new to me, the whole Army thing.” She said. “I just didn’t know what to do.” And while their relationship was still new, Cowan didn’t considered giving up on it, before or after the injury. “I never knew how close we were going to get. I had barely known this boy, and then I felt like I was in this huge commitment, but never once in the entire thing did I ever feel like I was going to break up with him or leave him,” she said. “People were, like, you could have taken the easy way out and left because you’ve only known him for two months, but that never crossed my mind.” McCalley, whose husband was deployed with Crawford, admired this mindset in her friend. “They didn’t know each other for a terribly long amount of time, and in the Army it is common for a soldier to deploy and their significant other to leave them, but not Loren,” McCalley said. “She is a one of a kind girl.” On New Year’s Day 2012, Crawford returned to Texas to continue the road toward recovery in San Antonio, where Cowan traveled to be by his side nearly every weekend. Doctors had warned of potential paralysis, but even in the early days when little was known, Cowan remained hopeful. “They never said he was going to walk or not going to walk, but I felt like he would,” she said. Today, with the help of braces, Crawford is able to do just that in his therapy sessions. But even with the progress, the journey has been full of many ups and downs. “The recovery process has been just a roller coaster ride to say the very least,” he said. “There are some weeks that I progress very quickly,...

Read More

Art exhibit highlights Christian symbol

From a sixth century coin, to pieces from the Middle Ages and  Renaissance, to modern American works, the Cross/ Purpose art exhibit displays how artists throughout history have depicted the crucifix and cross in various expressive ways. The traveling show from Christians in the Visual Arts includes 49 artworks and is on view until Feb. 1 in the Baugh Center for the Visual Arts. An opening reception was held Jan. 10. Professor and Chair for the art department Hershall Seals said the exhibit complements the university’s values. “Since this is a Christian institution, we felt it was a really good fit to bring quality works of art that deal with our primary theological source, which is Christ,” he said. Though it deals with a religious theme, Seals believes it can be of interest to a wide audience. “The show is not only interesting to Christians who are more theologically  interested, but it’s also a show that appeals to fine artists who may or may not be that enthused about the subject,” he said. “What’s so interesting is the variety of art in it and the quality of the prints and drawings and paintings.” With pieces spanning so many time periods, the exhibit is also a lesson in art history and has received positive reactions so far. “People who have seen the show love it,” Seals said. “I think they can get a miniature art history overview…. You can see by looking from picture to picture to picture where that thing came from,historically speaking, by the way that image is drawn, the technique. To me, the takeaway is the beauty of the differences in the art historical time frame.” Sophomore graphic design major Brittany Davis found the etchings particularly  interesting. “They had so much detail on such a small amount of space,” she said. Sophomore fine arts major Sarah Wright was also impressed with the quality of the show’s pieces. “I really enjoyed looking at the old lithograph pieces that incorporated a lot of figures, symbols and beautiful details of the moment Jesus was on the cross. I also enjoyed looking at the abstract versions of Jesus’s crucifixion as well. The impact of the harsh lines and the use of colors emphasized the pain and suffering He had endured,” she said. Overall, Davis enjoyed the exhibit’s theme and the quality of the show and believes other students should take advantage of the opportunities to see such works. “UMHB chooses art exhibits that have a lot of meaning,” she said. “All art is meant to communicate to the viewer. That’s the point of art, to evoke feeling and emotion, so the...

Read More
Students give more than presents during Christmas break
Jan08

Students give more than presents during Christmas break

Having a parentless child cling to her side, calling her “mama,” may have elicited some tears from senior public relations major Bailey Starnes, but it also made her third trip to Moldova well worth it. She has spent part of her Christmas break each yearsharing Christ with orphans and putting a warm pair of boots on each of their feet. When Starnes originally sought out missions opportunities three years ago, she intended to go to Haiti. After a lot of prayer, she instead found herself in the Eastern European country, far from where she thought she’d end up, and she has returned ever since. “I keep going back because I can never stop thinking about the ministry I’ve been a part of there. Mostly, for three years, I haven’t been able to stop thinking about the sweet orphans in Moldova,” she said. Starnes and her team visited several orphanages a day, placing shoes on each of their feet. They would then gather everyone together, where a translator would help them tell the children about God’s love for them. She said that not only is the Boot Mission important for providing a physical need for the kids, but it also “shows the orphans of Moldova that someone cares about them, and, further, that there is hope found in the Lord.” Freshman education major Kevin Orr traveled alongside Starnes for the first time this Christmas break.Before looking at the list of places to serve through GoNow Missions, he had never heard of the country, but soon started seeing things about it everywhere. “I then began getting a passion for Moldova, and it was the only place I could see myself going,” Orr said. At each orphanage the team visited, children gathered to hear about Christ and were asked to pray silently to receive him in their hearts. “At the first few, I wondered if they even understood with the language barrier and doubted that many kids even became believers,” Orr said. However, at one orphanage, the speaker forgot to say to pray silently, and he heard the sound of small voices echoing the translator as they prayed the prayer of salvation. “It showed the power God has to bring people to Him even with the language barrier,” Orr said. Far from the freezing temperatures of Moldova, senior nursing major Ben Baecker served during the break in Beira, Mozambique. Friends of his returned from Beira after starting the nonprofit Little Changes International, and they urged Baecker to go. During his time there, he did a multitude of tasks, such as working in an OB clinic, visiting orphanages, shadowing a doctor and hanging...

Read More
Being too safe? Don’t be sorry
Jan08

Being too safe? Don’t be sorry

When parents tell you to do things like make sure the windows in your house are locked or to hide valuables under the seat when leaving them in the car, their suggestions often elicit a chuckle or an eye roll. The abundant amount of concern feels unnecessary and even seems to verge on paranoia at times. But after being welcomed back from the holiday break to find my house had been broken into, I realized just how valuable all of that “overprotective” advice really is. The old adage just might be true. You really can’t ever be too careful. While the intruder spent quite a bit of energy forcing his or her way through our back door, leaving its frame ripped from the wall, they left with nothing to show for it, all thanks to my roommate listening to her parents’ advice. In spite of teasing from friends and from me about being overly paranoid, she loaded up our flat screen television the morning before we left for the month-long break after her dad suggested it would be a smart idea to bring it home. We all scoffed at how silly it was. Who would come in and take it? But when I realized someone had been in our house during our absence, my response was how thankful I was that she hadn’t listened to us. I don’t know where our TV would be right now if she had, but I’m pretty certain it wouldn’t be sitting in our living room feeding our appetites for the mindless programming we’ve come to love so much. There’s a level of invincibility when you’re young and in college that causes us to throw caution to the wind because we don’t think certain things will actually happen to us. We go about our days, wrapped up in our classes and social lives with little thought to much else. Most of the time, that works out just fine, but every once in a while, you realize caution isn’t such a drag. Because of caution I’ll be watching Downton Abbey, Here Comes Honey Boo Boo and The Bachelor this week from the comfort of my couch. And for that, I am eternally...

Read More