Health fair benefits community, students

More than 50 vendors from health and wellness related businesses in the area gathered March 25 in Mayborn Campus Center Arena for the 12th annual UMHB and Community Health Fair, known as Health Quest. With a variety of exhibits, the fair offered information and demonstrations for students, faculty, staff and the public. Campus Nurse Debbie Rosenberger is in charge of the event and works yearlong to ensure that it provides the campus and community with access to the important healthcare information and services available to them. “We do the health fair for a couple of reasons,” Rosenberger said. “One is to increase health awareness. Also, it is to be a resource to students.” Rosenberger said the vendors from the free and reduced-cost clinics in the area, as well as free services offered throughout the day, are some of the most valuable aspects of Health Quest. “We have a pretty good component of our students who don’t have health insurance, and we want to give an option,” she said. Other represented  businesses included Belton Eye Center, Fitness Equipment Unlimited, Scott & White Hospital and many more. “Vendors vary from year to year,” Rosenberger said. “I think people have been pretty happy with what’s been here, and there’s been a wide variety of things folks can do.” The Central Texas Council on Alcoholism and Drug Abuse was one organization present to inform and educate the public. Felix Rubert, the representative from CTCADA, hoped that by attending the event, he could help bring awareness to students in a relaxed environment. “We don’t want to force it on you not to do drugs,” he said. “But, you can come over to look at our things, and if you have questions we can provide answers.” Rubert thinks that the key to the organization’s mission is education, which is the purpose for attending. “You’re going to make a choice one way or the other. If you learn enough about it, you can make an educated choice,” he said. Along with information, the event also offered exercise demonstrations, free massages and smoothies and door prizes. Sophomore business major Michael Murphy was enticed to come to Health Quest after attending last year and hearing about this year’s big give-away, a Kindle. “I came last year, too, and it was fun. And, when I heard they were giving away a Kindle, I came,” he said Sophomore psychology major Kristina Zufall is a student worker for counseling and health services, which puts on Health Quest, and thinks the event was successful. “We had a bunch of students come in, especially around lunch time,” Zufall said. “It’s been really awesome.”...

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Candidates try to stand out peers

The posters have all been up, the debates have been held, and after two weeks of campaigning it is finally time to start voting for the next student body president. On  March 11 the results of the election will be announced in an e-mail sent out to students. Along with meeting the minimum requirements to run for office, Director of Student Organizations and adviser for Student Government Kristy Brischke stressed that it will take many things for the candidates to fill the role of president. “They’ve got to have the ability to work with administration … as well as students, command respect, and empower the senate and executive cabinet,” she said. Junior international business major Tobin Davies may know a little bit about the job of president, as he currently fills the position for the junior class. As a candidate for student body president, Davies is running on a platform centered on communication. During his time with the Student Government Association, he has seen the opportunity for growth in communication between SGA and the student body, as well as with administration. “There are a lot of times when the student body doesn’t know what’s going on with SGA. If they knew, they’d be able to give more feedback,” Davies said. As roommate of current Student Body President Tommy Wilson, Davies realizes what kind of commitment the position will require. Another candidate wanting to bridge the gap between administration and students is junior philosophy/ theology and history double major Tyler Potts. “Truly being a representative for both is the ultimate job,” he said. Potts currently serves as the director of spiritual life for SGA, and thinks that as student body president his experience would help him to continue the work he and his fellow SGA members have already begun. “In order for that vision to grow, you have to have somebody who has already bought into it,” he said. The vision Potts speaks of is one of a community in which every student is involved.. “It’s clear that if we are a Christian school, we should be about uniting the church, and every person is a piece of that puzzle,” he said. “We have a core of 300 to 400 students who are involved, and they’re great, but it’s not reflective of our student population.” Serving on SGA since his freshman year, sophomore Christian studies major Ryan Murphy thinks the Lord has been preparing him for the coveted position of student body president. “I’ve always felt a calling into a leadership position, and running for student body president, in my opinion, is the ultimate way to submit to that calling,”...

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The frill of the hunt
Mar08

The frill of the hunt

Though some may consider hunting a “man’s sport”, it’s not just boys enjoying the thrill. From the rifles and bows to the early mornings, girls are doing it all, and proving they can hang with the guys. For as long as she can remember, junior exercise sport science major Amber Sherman, along with her sister, has been hunting alongside all the men in her family. “When we were born my dad had hunting knives made for us,” Sherman said. At 7-years-old she began practicing with her first BB gun, shooting tin cans in the backyard and receiving the nickname “Amber Oakley” from one of her uncles. It was with her father and uncles on an old rice field just outside of town that Sherman developed her love for the sport. She said, “I always felt like I was a big girl going on an important hunt.” Sherman describes a typical day of hunting as waking up early, grabbing some coffee and heading out. “We’re in the stand before the sun comes up, and we stay until we get hungry; usually around noon,” she said. Though she enjoys all of her hunts, the most memorable happened three years ago. “It was my first time to shoot with a bow,” Sherman said. “It was a perfect shot.” Sophomore social work major Kristen Kimmel recently experienced her first real hunt. Though she has mixed feelings about the expedition, she gained a new appreciation for hunting and hunters alike. “It’s more of a sport than I thought. I thought it was just people walking around, but there’s an art to it,” Kimmel said. Growing up in a small town, Kimmel saw many of her female friends going on hunts with their dads and wanted to finally see what it was all about. After hours of sitting in the stand in the cold, Kimmel walked away from her first hunt empty handed but happy to have had the time to bond with her father. “I enjoyed going with my dad to see him do something he enjoys,” she said. While hunting is something she has always enjoyed doing, Sherman does admit that as a female hunter she is often  teased by the guys who participate in the sport and feel that girls cannot perform as well. “I think they just want to be the ones to teach the girls how to do it,” Sherman said. Kimmel has found that there is often the misconception that hunting is just for guys, but has seen this trend begin to change. “Hunting is stereotyped with boys, but I think it’s cool to see more girls doing it....

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