McLane Thanksgiving fundraiser a success
Nov16

McLane Thanksgiving fundraiser a success

The season of thanks and giving is in full swing, and with UMHB’s win against ETBU Saturday came one more thing to be thankful for. The men of McLane Hall pledged to donate a Thanksgiving meal for each touchdown scored against ETBU. These meals will be distributed to local families in need before Thanksgiving. The Cru football team scored four touchdowns in their 31-21 victory over the ETBU Tigers, the tenth win of their undefeated regular season. However, McLane Hall raised over $135, enough money for six meals, so they will be donating in surplus this year. Daegan Fletcher, a sophomore Christian studies major, was one of the RAs responsible for gathering donations. Fletcher enjoyed the open-handed spirit of giving displayed by the hall’s residents. “It’s good to see a bunch of guys in the dorm come together for a good cause,” Fletcher said. “I hope our small donations will fill both the hearts and the stomachs of the needy this Thanksgiving.” Sophomore business major Taylor Billingsley was another RA impressed by the willingness to give shown by the McLane men. “It’s actually quite touching to see how much these guys care,” Billingsley said. “Watching broke college guys go through their wallets for spare change, just so others can enjoy Thanksgiving is what this holiday is all about.” Billingsley appreciated how much his fellow students care for their community. “This event always shows how much McLane hall cares about the people of Belton,” Billingsley said. “What better way to spread Thanksgiving joy than with the gift of a good meal?” This is the sixth year McLane Hall has held Turkeys for Touchdowns. In that time, the residents of the hall have provided more than 35 families with Thanksgiving meals. Additionally, they have donated over $1,400 to Helping Hands Ministry of Belton. Last year, Helping Hands donated 1,678 meals to the needy during the holidays. McLane Hall looks to continue their tradition of generosity for years to...

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Cru tames Tigers, 31-21
Nov15

Cru tames Tigers, 31-21

UMHB emerged victorious from a well-fought battle with the ETBU Tigers on Saturday. With this, their tenth win, the Cru ends the regular season with their 15th (13th consecutive) ASC title and a perfect 10-0 record (9-0 conference). UMHB came out of the gates hot, their defense getting a stop, and their offense striking quickly to put six points on the board. On just his second snap of the game, quarterback Carl Robinson connected with a wide-open TJ Josey for a 44-yard score. The John Mowery extra point was good, putting the Cru up 7-0. The Tigers capitalized on a Carl Robinson interception during UMHB’s next possession, immediately connecting on a long touchdown pass of their own, tying the game at 7 apiece. After an ETBU three-and-out, which defensive tackle Brazos Fuller capped off with a 9-yard sack, Bryce Wilkerson returned the punt 40 yards to score UMHB’s second touchdown of the afternoon. On the Tiger’s next possession, defensive tackle Joey Longoria stopped a run cold, then imposed his will on ETBU quarterback Brian Baca, not only recording a strip sack, but also recovering the fumble for the Cru. The Cru offense failed to capitalize on this turnover, punting the ball back to the Tigers, who then drove 80 yards downfield to score as the second quarter began. UMHB blocked the extra point, keeping the score at 14-13, Cru. For the remainder of the first half, UMHB’s offense stalled, failing to produce any substantial drives. In the closing minutes of the second quarter, the Tigers’ offense drove into the Cru red zone, but failed to score, due to a key third-down stop, followed by a blocked field goal attempt by special teams player Jordan Millar. UMHB received the second half kickoff, but immediately turned the ball over to the Tigers on an overthrown pass from Robinson. Sensing the change in momentum, linebacker Tevin Jones took matters into his own hands. “You get into the zone and start seeing yourself making plays,” Jones said. “It all just starts to feel natural.” To say that Jones was “in the zone” would be an understatement. The junior linebacker broke up a pass on first down, then made two consecutive tackles to force an ETBU three-and-out. With his stellar play, Jones almost singlehandedly gained back the momentum for the Cru. He finished the game with a career high 19 tackles. This impressive stop was seemingly all the UMHB offense needed, for quarterback Kyle Jones found Wilkerson for a 13-yard touchdown. The Tigers immediately responded with a scoring drive of their own, taking advantage of UMHB’s struggle to contain Baca, who repeatedly rushed for...

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Taking a stand by taking a knee
Oct26

Taking a stand by taking a knee

As the NFL season enters its seventh week of play, no storyline is more controversial and emotionally charged than players’ pregame protests. Over the course of the season, some players have used the time during the national anthem to protest racial inequality and police brutailty by taking a knee or raising a fist. This collective outcry of players has divided the nation. One side asserts that the NFL or team owners must discipline players for disrespecting the anthem and the flag of their country. The other camp praises the players for using their presence on national television to increase awareness of the issues at hand. I find the entire situation perplexing. I understand the players’ desire to see change in their country, and acknowledge and fully support their right to lobby for that change however they see fit. If they wish to act in a manner that many believe disrespects the flag, they are exercising the very right to free speech guaranteed to them by the First Amendment, protected by our military, and represented by the flag. The idea that the powers that be should prevent players from protesting in this manner is unconstitutional, and defies what the flag represents more than the protests themselves. Although players can protest in this manner, they should not for two reasons. First, and most importantly, kneeling during the national anthem polarizes their audience. The group that ardently supports what the players stand (or rather, kneel) for generally will approve of their method of protest. On the other hand, those who disagree with the players’ pregame demonstrations of discontent will accuse them of disrespecting the flag. This effectively closes the minds of the group of people the players strive to impact before they are able to convey their message. Second, kneeling for the anthem is so controversial that it distracts from the issues the players are attempting to address. The entire uproar in the media has been with regard to the protests themselves, with next to no coverage devoted to police brutality and racial inequality. The protesting players drown out their own voices when they choose to demonstrate in such a controversial manner. NFL players have a large fan base and can speak at events, organize city council meetings and encourage others to raise awareness on social media, all without removing the public’s attention from their cause entirely. That way, many Americans would not have to choose between supporting a vital awareness campaign and respecting their country. The two must not be mutually exclusive in order for change to occur....

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Give without prejudice
Oct13

Give without prejudice

“Hey man, you got some change? It’s a real hot day, and I could use a drink.” Expectant eyes look into mine as I reach for my wallet. My conviction to be generous wrestles with my doubt: could I be helping quench this man’s thirst for Dr. Pepper, or for something far more destructive? How am I to know how this stranger will spend my three dollars? As he disappears around the corner, I consider the situation, which reminds me of a Kendrick Lamar song. In “How Much a Dollar Cost,” Lamar describes a scene nearly identical to what I had just experienced, but different in one important detail: Lamar denies the homeless man a single dollar. After a brief conversation with Lamar, the man reveals himself to be Jesus Christ, telling Lamar that the price of the dollar was his place in heaven. As a commentary on greed, “How Much a Dollar Cost” encourages listeners to think not of panhandler’s plans for their money, but rather of the bigger picture: their duties as human beings to take care of each other. By extension, Lamar appeals to Christians to be Christ-like in our treatment of others, to give without hesitation. In a train station, I find myself able to, although unsure of his motives, do my best to make a positive impact on the man’s life in the only way I can. I do not believe that we should always assume the best, but to make a positive impact on others; it is necessary to suspend disbelief and listen to God. How unfortunate would it be to deny a brother or sister in Christ a few dollars out of distrust or a lack of understanding? Using common sense is still important. We can trust God to use our money for His good, while keeping an eye out for obvious warning signs that something is not right. Certainly there are situations where a handout will perpetuate a problem instead of alleviating it. At the end of the day, I believe it is always best to give to the needy, unless I see overwhelming evidence that I will do more harm than good. When on the fence about it, I find it best to trust God and let Him use my pocket change to touch another’s life. The homeless man returns and sits down a few minutes later, change from the vending machine in one hand, and a Dr Pepper in the...

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Fantasy Football: Bringing Crusaders together
Sep28

Fantasy Football: Bringing Crusaders together

Football season is in full swing, and many UMHB students are making the most of it by getting together with their friends to play fantasy football. Fantasy football aficionados select professional football players in a draft at the beginning of the season. These chosen professional players make up a fantasy football team, which they pit against the fantasy teams of others in their league. Each week, teams earn points based upon the performance of professional players in NFL games, and the teams with the most points emerge victorious. Players earn six points for each receiving and rushing touchdown, four points for every passing touchdown, one point for every 10 rushing or receiving yards, and one point for every 25 passing yards that their professional players accrue each week. Teams also earn points for defensive efficiency and scoring. Bragging rights are the most common prize for fantasy football victories. UMHB students, like freshman accounting major Tyler Mora, feel motivated to play fantasy football for a variety of reasons. “I play because it allows me to both enjoy the sport of football and to make friends all at once,” Mora said. “I love the atmosphere of friendly competition.” To freshman psychology major Ryan McKissick, developing relationships through fantasy football is also important, but not paramount. “I play because my friends are playing,” McKissick said. “But I really like winning.” Other students, like freshman biology pre-med major Megan Skains, are new to fantasy football and are trying it out for the first time. “I heard people in my Cru group talking about it and it sounded like fun,” Skains said. “It’s been a great experience so far.” “Fantasy football requires attention to detail, patience, and a basic knowledge of professional football. At the same time, it is an excellent way to discover more about the game,” Mora said. “I’d recommend it to anybody who wants to learn more about football,” Mora said. “It’s a good gateway for anybody who doesn’t know much about the sport.” Last week, Mora suffered a loss by an extremely small margin. He is now 1-1 (one win and one loss) in his league, but is glad things are staying interesting. “My season started off well,” Mora said. “But the competition is rather stiff in my league, so all the games have been close.” McKissick is also hopeful for his season. Despite having drafted a solid team, he fell to Mora in week one, but remained unfazed, and bounced back for a victory the following week. Others, like Skains, have had less luck. She starts the season 0-2, still looking for her first victory. “My season isn’t starting...

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