Give without prejudice
Oct13

Give without prejudice

“Hey man, you got some change? It’s a real hot day, and I could use a drink.” Expectant eyes look into mine as I reach for my wallet. My conviction to be generous wrestles with my doubt: could I be helping quench this man’s thirst for Dr. Pepper, or for something far more destructive? How am I to know how this stranger will spend my three dollars? As he disappears around the corner, I consider the situation, which reminds me of a Kendrick Lamar song. In “How Much a Dollar Cost,” Lamar describes a scene nearly identical to what I had just experienced, but different in one important detail: Lamar denies the homeless man a single dollar. After a brief conversation with Lamar, the man reveals himself to be Jesus Christ, telling Lamar that the price of the dollar was his place in heaven. As a commentary on greed, “How Much a Dollar Cost” encourages listeners to think not of panhandler’s plans for their money, but rather of the bigger picture: their duties as human beings to take care of each other. By extension, Lamar appeals to Christians to be Christ-like in our treatment of others, to give without hesitation. In a train station, I find myself able to, although unsure of his motives, do my best to make a positive impact on the man’s life in the only way I can. I do not believe that we should always assume the best, but to make a positive impact on others; it is necessary to suspend disbelief and listen to God. How unfortunate would it be to deny a brother or sister in Christ a few dollars out of distrust or a lack of understanding? Using common sense is still important. We can trust God to use our money for His good, while keeping an eye out for obvious warning signs that something is not right. Certainly there are situations where a handout will perpetuate a problem instead of alleviating it. At the end of the day, I believe it is always best to give to the needy, unless I see overwhelming evidence that I will do more harm than good. When on the fence about it, I find it best to trust God and let Him use my pocket change to touch another’s life. The homeless man returns and sits down a few minutes later, change from the vending machine in one hand, and a Dr Pepper in the...

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Fantasy Football: Bringing Crusaders together
Sep28

Fantasy Football: Bringing Crusaders together

Football season is in full swing, and many UMHB students are making the most of it by getting together with their friends to play fantasy football. Fantasy football aficionados select professional football players in a draft at the beginning of the season. These chosen professional players make up a fantasy football team, which they pit against the fantasy teams of others in their league. Each week, teams earn points based upon the performance of professional players in NFL games, and the teams with the most points emerge victorious. Players earn six points for each receiving and rushing touchdown, four points for every passing touchdown, one point for every 10 rushing or receiving yards, and one point for every 25 passing yards that their professional players accrue each week. Teams also earn points for defensive efficiency and scoring. Bragging rights are the most common prize for fantasy football victories. UMHB students, like freshman accounting major Tyler Mora, feel motivated to play fantasy football for a variety of reasons. “I play because it allows me to both enjoy the sport of football and to make friends all at once,” Mora said. “I love the atmosphere of friendly competition.” To freshman psychology major Ryan McKissick, developing relationships through fantasy football is also important, but not paramount. “I play because my friends are playing,” McKissick said. “But I really like winning.” Other students, like freshman biology pre-med major Megan Skains, are new to fantasy football and are trying it out for the first time. “I heard people in my Cru group talking about it and it sounded like fun,” Skains said. “It’s been a great experience so far.” “Fantasy football requires attention to detail, patience, and a basic knowledge of professional football. At the same time, it is an excellent way to discover more about the game,” Mora said. “I’d recommend it to anybody who wants to learn more about football,” Mora said. “It’s a good gateway for anybody who doesn’t know much about the sport.” Last week, Mora suffered a loss by an extremely small margin. He is now 1-1 (one win and one loss) in his league, but is glad things are staying interesting. “My season started off well,” Mora said. “But the competition is rather stiff in my league, so all the games have been close.” McKissick is also hopeful for his season. Despite having drafted a solid team, he fell to Mora in week one, but remained unfazed, and bounced back for a victory the following week. Others, like Skains, have had less luck. She starts the season 0-2, still looking for her first victory. “My season isn’t starting...

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Cru kennels Bulldogs 50-7
Sep28

Cru kennels Bulldogs 50-7

UMHB administered a Saturday-night beatdown to the Texas Lutheran University Bulldogs, outscoring their opponents by 43 points and improving to 3-0 on the season. The Crusader defense held TLU scoreless until the final seconds of the game, when a garbage-time touchdown preserved a little of the bulldogs’ dignity. UMHB started the game by making a statement. After the Cru forced a Bulldog fourth down on their opening possession, TLU took a chance and attempted to continue their drive. Junior linebacker Santos Villarreal had other plans, and intercepted the fourth down pass, crushing the Bulldogs’ hopes of a productive opening drive. “I read the O-line and saw it was going to be a pass,” Villarreal said. “The quarterback threw a funny ball, and I knew I had to make the pick.” This takeaway set the tone for the game, and gave the Cru excellent field position, which they capitalized on, scoring their first points of the game a few minutes later. After a fourth down conversion from junior running back Markeith Miller, junior quarterback TJ Josey threw a laser, hitting senior wide receiver Bryce Wilkerson in the end zone for 6 points. For the rest of the first quarter and throughout the second, the Crusader offense continued to be efficient, never missing an opportunity to score. Senior kicker John Mowery hit two field goals, and sophomore quarterback Kyle Jones orchestrated a spectacular touchdown drive. Jones went 4/4, passing for 84 yards on the drive, before Miller took a direct snap at the Bulldog 2-yard line and punched the ball into the end zone for six points. Quarterbacks Josey and Jones both had a favorite receiver Saturday night — sophomore Jonel Reed. The receiver had a monster game, including hauling in a third quarter touchdown from Jones and catching back-to-back passes during Jones’ prolific second-quarter drive. One play from that drive turned many heads. “I lined up to run a post route,” Reed said. “I watched the corner turn his hips, and I knew he w as beat. Then I just had to get the ball.” Reed hauled in the pass, giving the Cru excellent position to finish the drive with a touchdown. The Crusader defense looked frightening, recording five takeaways. In addition to Villareal’s interception, freshman safety Jefferson Fritz and senior cornerback Reggie Wilson picked off the TLU quarterback once apiece. Junior safety D’Andre Jackson recovered a fumble to start the Bulldogs’ second possession, ending it after a single snap. Finally, sophomore defensive end De Jackson recovered a strip sack in the fourth quarter and returned it for a touchdown. Those points would be the last of many nails in...

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UMHB opens season with Sul Ross win
Sep14

UMHB opens season with Sul Ross win

Crusader Stadium was electric as the reigning national champions took the field Saturday evening. Fans packed the stands and the stadium rumbled with excitement at kickoff. Cru football looked solid during their 23-7 victory against the Sul Ross State Lobos. The Cru offense made a statement early, turning their first possession into a seemingly effortless three points. UMHB’s defensive unit kept the intensity high, forcing three straight 3-and-outs on successive Lobos possessions. Freshman safety number 43 Jefferson Fritz played a key role in one of these stops, anticipating the third down pass and stopping a Sul Ross receiver cold. “It was fun and really exciting getting to go out there and finally play,” Fritz said of his first collegiate game. “In college, the game is much faster-paced, and the guy are faster and bigger too.” Fritz seems to have made the transition from high school smoothly and is already contributing to the team. The Cru defense dominated the first half of the game, allowing no points. They gave up just one first down, and collected a turnover in the red zone, which the offense then converted into three points. Senior cornerback number 2 Kris Brown looked particularly comfortable on the field. “It felt good to be out there just flyin’ around,” Brown said. “I felt fast and healthy, and it was good to see the guys flyin’ out there too.” Brown helped spearhead an impressive defensive performance by the Cru, who allowed Sul Ross to score on only one of their 11 possessions. Crusader offense played a solid game, scoring a touchdown in each half after senior kicker number 13 John Mowery put UMHB up 9-0 with a flurry of field goals. Mowery was a perfect 3/3 on the night. Senior wide receiver number 1 Bryce Wilkerson made it look easy, expertly weaving his way through defensive traffic for a 25-yard touchdown reception with 3:54 left in the second quarter, increasing the Cru lead to 16-0 after the Mowery extra point. Freshman wide receiver number 19 Isaiah Townes dazzled onlookers with his debut score, a 9-yard touchdown grab, midway through the third quarter. Senior quarterback number 10 TJ Josey passed Townes a dime on a corner fade route, and Townes came down with the football in the end zone despite jarring contact with a defender. These were the final Cru points of the night, further increasing their lead to 23-0. “TJ told me in the huddle that I was getting the ball,” Townes said. “This opportunity was a long time coming, and when it was my time to do my job, I went up there and made the play.”...

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QB Josey: season-ready
Sep08

QB Josey: season-ready

A good quarterback is the glue that holds a football team together. He sets the tone of the entire game, orchestrating drives for the offense and giving the defense key minutes of rest between possessions. He is the face of his team, and despite his crucial role in gameplay, he is first and foremost a leader. To nobody is this more apparent than junior TJ Josey, who is starting his first year at quarterback for the Cru. “The most important thing to me is being the very best leader I can be,” Josey said. “It’s my job to put the team into a position where we can win. The goal is to be 1-0 every week.” For a player relatively new at the position – Josey was a quarterback in high school, but has predominately played wide receiver for UMHB – he is quickly developing the traits required to bring him and the team success. Head coach Pete Fredenburg feels confident in Josey, and expects excellence from him all season. “[Josey] really went to work on his leadership,” Fredenburg said. “He has really embraced his new role, and he gets a little better every day. I look forward to seeing him develop as the leader of our offense.” Josey’s ability to lead by example impresses his teammates daily, as does his energy and willingness to communicate. “He keeps everybody hyped and full of energy,” freshman offensive lineman Azaviar Carter said. “He values communication, and holds himself and his teammates to very high standards.” Freshman defensive end/tight end Jaeron Minnieweather echoes Carter’s sentiment. “When he gets going, it really motivates the whole team,” Minnieweather said. Not only is Josey a capable helmsman for the UMHB squad, but he is also a fantastic athlete. His natural athleticism, high football I.Q., and knack for seeing opportunities to scramble up-field all combine to make him a deadly dual-threat quarterback. “He’s very good at running the ball,” Coach Fredenburg said. “When he runs the option, he’s absolutely lethal.” Sophomore offensive lineman Noah Stebens admires Josey’s playmaking ability. “He’s very smart and can think on his feet,” Stebens said. “He communicates well in in-game situations, and when the time comes to make a choice, TJ is decisive and committed. He does an especially good job with calling audibles and keeping the offense moving.” So often, such talent comes packaged with arrogance, but despite his abundance of skill, Josey is humble and down-to-Earth. He is polite and soft-spoken, and according to Coach Fredenburg, a pleasure to coach. “He’s extremely coachable,” Fredenburg said. “He’s a great team player and is always ready to work.” Although Josey does...

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