The Bells Podcast – February 4, 2016
Feb04

The Bells Podcast – February 4, 2016

Produced by Cody Weems and Jigar Bhakta Music by “OctoBlues” Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ “I’m a Believer” by The Monkees played in accordance with Fair Use and Copyright...

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The Bells Podcast – February 1, 2016
Feb01

The Bells Podcast – February 1, 2016

Produced by Cody Weems and Jigar Bhakta Music by Enrize Studios “You’ve Got That Lovin’ Feelin'” by The Righteous Brothers played in accordance with Fair Use and Copyright...

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Oscar discrimination arguement is not consistent with historical data

The landscape issue of racial diversity has been one of the longest running issues in the United States. And now we’re seeing that topic being raised in the film industry. But is it really a problem? The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences have been around since 1927. It is one of the most prestigious organizations in Hollywood, and it is now being defamed for its lack of racial diversity. I really don’t think it’s the lack of diversity in the Academy as it is the lack facts regarding the subject. News and media outlets have made it extremely difficult to filter out statistics and facts from opinion and fluff. For example, in the 1940s, the United States Census Bureau released data showing that 89.8 percent of the U.S. population was White and 9.8 percent was Black or African-American. In 2010, the Black or African-American population accounted for 12.6 percent of the American population. According to a study conducted at the University of Southern California, 14 percent of movies show Black actors at or within two percentage points of the U.S. Census. So there is a correlation between actor roles and general population. More so, out of the 200 nominations for actor roles at the Academy Awards, only one nominee was Black between 1940 and 1949. Between 2000 and 2009, 16 nominees were Black out of the 200 nominations. From 2010 to present day, 7 nominations went to Black or African-American actors. Statistically, the Academy Award nominations have been getting more and more diverse. This year seems to just be an anomaly or an outlier from previous years. I won’t disagree with how Selma got snubbed in last year’s nominations. The film was truly powerful and emotionally moving and was unlike any movie that had come before it, but that doesn’t mean its snubbing was somehow racially influenced. According to several prominent, large-market film critics, had the number of nominations for Best Picture increased from eight to 10, the largely talked-about biopic of the year Straight Outta Compton would have most definitely been number nine on their personal list for this year. But stories like those told in movies like Straight Outta Compton and Selma are distant from the normal narrative film styles, they’ve gained more attention from younger audiences. So, #OscarsSoWhite is a blatant lie. Films are becoming more and more diverse through generations. It’s just taking a bit longer for change to take place. The people in the Academy will always change with newer, younger and more experienced generations. It will just take a bit longer for change to...

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