Graduates Share Keys to Their Success in Business
Oct22

Graduates Share Keys to Their Success in Business

Each year, a new class of Crusaders crosses the stage to face life’s next challenge: What’s next? Often, alumni pave the way for students. Some continue their education; others apply for jobs. Many start businesses, crediting their alma mater for life lessons that shaped their careers. Alumnus Luke Nunnally, ’07 business management, founded Squeaky Wheel Marketing out of a class project. He credits Dr. Barbara Dalby for sparking his interest in starting a business. “I thought I was going to work in some sort of management, like a real estate type deal,” he said. “She’s really good at inspiration and trying to give people an idea.” During an entrepreneurship class, Nunnally learned about using website grids to sell advertisements to local businesses. He seized the opportunity and bought a domain on his iPhone during class. Nunnally and a friend sold spots on their website around Belton and tasted the excitement of running their own business. “We presold … seven to eight thousand dollars in that November to December timeframe,” he said. “If you get eight grand in college off a project, you’re pretty pumped.” Today, Squeaky Wheel Marketing provides website designs and social media management as well as operating several boards across the state. While Nunnally ended up in the business world he studied, 2008 theology/philosophy alumna Haley Ogle followed a different path. “I was one of those students who had no clue what I wanted to do when I entered college,” she said. “I changed my major almost every semester until I was in my junior year.” Ogle decided it was better to invest in something she was passionate about than something “practical” she would never use. After graduating, Ogle enrolled at the Culinary Academy of Austin and earned a Pastry Arts Certificate. She now runs The Garden Market and Bakery in Brenham. Starting a business can be challenging, but Ogle says it’s all about perspective. “Running a business is full of ups and downs,” she said. “The key is perspective and being able to laugh at yourself and all your stupid mistakes at the end of the day.” 2008 social work alumna Jade Pierce combined her passions into a photography business. The idea formed while working at a non-profit organization with special needs children. As Pierce got to know the families, she began capturing their stories with a camera. Though she considered it a hobby, Pierce began wondering if her photography could blossom into more. “After our daughter Gemma was born, it was like I could see time passing before my eyes. Moments were literally flying by me,” she said. “I started to feel the desire to...

Read More
Generation Y: Following Drug Culture
Oct09

Generation Y: Following Drug Culture

Since the early days of pop culture, the public has idolized the celebrity lifestyle. Stars set the standard for fashion and politics. But with great power comes great responsibility, and media influence is not always good. The problem of substance abuse is a societal behemoth, and celebrities are not exempt. Artists sing about getting high, athletes get busted for steroids, and dozens of actors spend time in rehab. By standing on America’s pedestal yet making poor life decisions, what example are celebrities setting? Young people tend to model their behavior after superstars. Does seeing Zac Efron or Michael Phelps with drugs influence them? Some of the greatest entertainers have prominently dealt with addictions. Stars like Ben “Macklemore” Haggerty, Robert Downey Jr. and Eminem have undergone rehabilitation for substance abuse. Others have died from overdosing and alcohol poisoning, leaving fans to mourn the loss of talents like Amy Winehouse and Heath Ledger. On July 13, Twitter flooded with reports that actor Cory Monteith was found dead in a hotel room. While the official cause was not immediately released, speculations were that he fatally combined alcohol with heroin. Monteith’s demise came after years of battling addiction, leaving fans to question what went wrong and Glee producers scrambling to write his character out of the show. Dr. Aida Sapp, a professor in the College of Nursing, uses stars like Monteith for mental health lectures. “He struggled, and he was so transparent about it,” she said. “Little did we know he was in the process of leaving a legacy for himself. He talked about how hard it was and how he just failed time and time again.” The public’s view of celebrity addictions is mixed. While some appreciate the authenticity of stars addressing their struggles, others grow tired of the constant coverage of hot messes like Miley Cyrus. Some have argued that when a celebrity overdoses, he or she is viewed as a “tragic hero,” but when an average Joe faces the same struggles, he or she is labeled a junkie who had it coming. Dean of students Ray Martin believes celebrities serve as a warning for young people rather than an example. “Who wants to have happen to them what’s happened to Lindsay Lohan?” he asked. “It’s just amazing what she’s thrown away.” Often, celebrities are sent to rehabilitation centers more resembling a beach resort than anything else. VH1 featured a television show called Celebrity Rehab, highlighting the lack of severity in dealing with addictions. Campus police Chief Gary Sargent finds that in many cases, A-listers’ behaviors desensitize the public to the consequences. “They don’t see the homeless person out on the street because...

Read More

iOS Update: Seventh Heaven or Major (Apple) Malfunction?

Apple fans across campus recently updated their iPhones to iOS 7. While some are left with a bitter taste, general campus consensus approves of the fresh look. Senior psychology major Jason Aleman was one of the first to receive the new update for his phone. He has owned each edition of the iPhone and its software since the first generation. “I heard about it during the summer, and when I found out it was coming out this fall, I was so excited,” he said. Apple Inc. officially announced the software’s release Sept. 10, and a week later students were eager to get their hands on the product. So far, the smallest details have proved to be the biggest hit. The upgrade features a whole new layout for the iPhone. Apple did not skimp on details, as even the menu colors are designed to detect each phone’s wallpaper and match. Junior nursing major Deanna Dawdy downloaded iOS 7 on her iPad and iPhone and has enjoyed exploring each new element. “I spent like three hours last night playing with it,” she said the day after upgrading. The notification center is improved, a flashlight is now located on the control panel and many major apps including Facebook and Twitter have reformatted their designs specifically for the new look. The iPhone’s multitasking capabilities are better than ever. Even Siri got a makeover; the voice assistant now includes a male voice option. Junior social work major Payton Pierce said, “It’s the little things” that make iOS 7 special. “I love, love, love the control panel. I don’t have data, so whenever I go off campus, I can just swipe up, click Wi-Fi button, close it back down, and I’m not wasting battery on Wi-Fi,” she said. “You don’t have to go into settings to change the brightness. So if you’re in a movie, it’s easy.” One highly anticipated feature was the iTunes Radio app. Described as the latest rival to Pandora, the Apple-style Internet radio allows users to create stations, stream music and purchase tracks all on one device. On the dark side, updating to iOS 7 is like biting into the forbidden fruit; once users upgrade, they will be unable to downgrade to the previous software. Some have found the new layout to be overly colorful and childish. Others have claimed it resembles the look of a Windows phone. The most common annoyance among Crusaders is setting a wallpaper using iOS 7. “Whenever you try to set a picture as your wallpaper, it zooms in, and you can’t unzoom,” Aleman said. “It’s everyone’s biggest complaint right now. … I think it’s a...

Read More
Room Checks: to clean or not to clean is the main question
Sep10

Room Checks: to clean or not to clean is the main question

Knock, knock. Who’s there? RA. It’s time for room check! When it comes to life on campus, room check is probably not at the top of students’ list of favorite things. In fact, most students groan at the thought of a resident assistant checking to see if they vacuumed the floor, cleaned the microwave and took out the trash. “This is college,” students think. “I don’t live with my parents anymore, so why should I have to do chores?” Believe it or not, room check is the perfect opportunity to spread one’s wings of independence. It may forever be a mystery how the messes materialize out of nowhere, but RAs are here to help students conquer clutter and keep their spaces tidy. Room check is also a great opportunity to impress your RA by leaving a gift. It’s also a time to play a prank or showcase eccentricities. Just ask your RA; room checks offer some of the best behind-the-scenes stories imaginable. Senior psychology major Tiffany Williamson is an RA at the Garner apartments. During her two and a half years on the job, she has experienced a wide variety of room check shenanigans. When working in Burt Hall, Williamson had a few resident pranksters. Their jokes included taping paper arrows all over the hallway, hanging various undergarments from the ceiling and setting a creepy doll in corners just to scare the neighbors. Along with the pranks, Williamson witnessed other quirks while conducting room checks. “I had two girls who had a stuffed animal cat in their room. It had a bed and name and everything,” Williamson said. “It gave me a little mini heart attack every time I went in.” When junior nursing major Britni Marburger worked in Stribling Hall, one resident would leave presents. Each time room check was scheduled, Marburger would find a small white board set out on the bed with a piece of candy. “Halfway through the semester, I went to her room and read the note,” Marburger said. “It said ‘Britni, I hope you have a wonderful day today. Sorry, I don’t have any candy. I’m just a poor college student. However, you are more than welcome to an apple that is in my refrigerator,’” she said. “I thought it was funny that she was offering me fruit because she couldn’t afford to get candy. Life of a poor college student.” Senior psychology major and former RA Lauren Rodriguez worked in Burt Hall and Garner for several semesters. One of her best room check stories occurred when she knocked on the door and her resident called out, “Go away. I am too tired...

Read More
Bringing home royal baby
Aug27

Bringing home royal baby

Once upon a time—July 22 to be exact—people around the globe rejoiced at the birth of a prince. England gained a new heir, and the world fell in love with a tiny baby. His Royal Highness Prince George Alexander Louis of Cambridge is just over one month old, but the infant has already changed history. The baby’s arrival meant that, for the first time since 1894, three generations of direct heirs to the throne are alive at one time. Thanks to the increase of social media, His Royal Highness had the most anticipated birth in recent history. How many people get their own Wikipedia page before their first birthday? It all started when the fairy tale romance of Prince William and girl-next-door Kate Middleton swept fans off their feet. By the royal wedding in 2011, a generation was captivated as history was written before their eyes. UMHB junior English major Sarah Tipton spent seven weeks in England this summer. She recalls witnessing the nuptials on television. “I remember getting up at four or five in the morning with my mom and sister to watch the royal wedding,” she said. “I watched the entire ceremony with so much anticipation.” The moment William and Catherine tied the knot, excitement for the birth of an heir commenced. When the news broke on Dec. 3, fans of the couple rejoiced. Estimates for the due date, name and sex of the child were speculative. People began placing wagers on everything from the birth date to the baby’s future career. British bookies brought in well over $1 million. The traditional royal birth announcement was displayed on an easel outside Buckingham Palace, but the baby’s arrival was officially declared first in a palace press release á la 21st-century. Gun salutes and the ringing of bells filled the country. Iconic landmarks lit up blue to signify the birth of a boy. Photographers staked out St. Mary’s Hospital waiting for the picture-perfect moment. While she appreciated the excitement surrounding the prince’s arrival, Tipton found the media obsession a bit extreme. “Every news station wanted to be the first to catch a glimpse of HRH and it became a bit of a circus,” she said. “But I did enjoy how people celebrated the royal baby.” Two days after the birth, William and Kate selected their son’s name. While designating a princely name seemed notable, it is the smaller decisions William and Kate make that will likely infl uence others. The royals will certainly be scrutinized as they raise their son. “I think Will and Kate’s parenting choices are already having an impact … Doubtlessly many mothers will take into...

Read More