Bond film celebrates “gold” anniversary
Oct02

Bond film celebrates “gold” anniversary

Fifty years ago, an iconic legend burst onto the big screen. On Oct. 12, 1962, the first James Bond movie, Dr. No, premiered. Ian Flemings’ character, James Bond: 007, was modeled after Merlin Minshall, who worked for Fleming as a World War II spy. But the name “Bond” Fleming took from a Caribbean bird expert and ornithologist. And now this name is a legend. Although Dr. No is not considered the greatest Bond film, another stands out that was made two years later: Goldfinger. With fast cars, double-crossing women, slick gadgets and outrageous power-hungry villains, James Bond makes Goldfingerthe most essential of all the films. In Dr. No, Bond goes to Jamaica to investigate the death of a fellow British agent. Soon he is led to the underground base of Dr. Julius No, who is plotting to disrupt an American space launch. Of course, scantily clad girls are in the movies. Ursula Andress co-stars in Dr. No as she Honey Ryder. Often referred to as the “definitive” Bond Girl, Andress’ appearance made her the first in a long line of actresses to add the “Bond Girl” status to their resumes. The first Bond, Sean Connery, set the tone for the hero in six of the films through the early 1960s to the early 1970s. Roger Moore, who played the hero for seven movies, was a little more comic and lighthearted. Timothy Dalton brought the character down to earth, making him a relatable character for two films. Pierce Brosnan played the agent four times and brought charm to the character. Daniel Craig, the current secret agent, brings back the Sean Connery days to the character. Craig has starred in Casino Royale, Quantum of Solace and Skyfall which will premiere Nov. 9. Agent 007 is a legend and will be remembered for his charm, tough appearance, cars and martinis, shaken, not...

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Forgive and Forget

“If it’s a legitimate rape, the female body has ways to try to shut that whole thing down,” Missouri Republican Representative Todd Akin said of a rape victim’s chances of becoming pregnant. Since the comment, a volcano of criticism has erupted all over the country. People, women in particular, were offended that Akin would say such a thing since he is a man. They asked themselves how would he know what a woman could do in that situation. Akin, a six-term congressman running against Democrat Sen. Claire McCaskill, was asked in an interview Aug. 19 in St. Louis if he would support abortions for women who have been raped. Forty-eight hours after the initial storm, he acknowledged that he “misspoke” and added that he understands that women can indeed get pregnant by rape. After he ignited such a political fire storm with his remarks, many Republicans want to eject him from the race. Despite many phone calls to pull out, including one from Republican vice president candidate Paul Ryan, Akin said that he would stay in the race against Democrat Sen. McCaskill. But let’s think about this. Akin isn’t the first politician to stick his foot in his mouth. What about Vice President Joe Biden, Republican Senator from Idaho Chuck Winder or former Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi? None of them stepped down from their positions. One of them though who utters thoughtless words is Biden, who once suggested that Republicans would usher in a return of slavery. “They’re going to put y’all back in chains,” he said to a Virginia audience. Back in March, Winder suggested that women might falsely use rape as an excuse to obtain an abortion. “I would hope that when a woman goes in to a physician with a rape issue, that physician will indeed ask her about perhaps her marriage. Was this pregnancy caused by normal relations in a marriage, or was it truly caused by a rape? I assume that’s part of the counseling that goes on,” Winder said. When Pelosi spoke about the new health care law, she said, “We have to pass it to know what’s in it.” Former Chair of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee Martin Frost said, “It’s very hard for party officials to force someone off the ballot. When I was chair of the DCCC, we always tried to encourage people to run, but once they won the primary, that was it. We never tried to force nobody off.” At some point there may be reason to remove someone from office or for them to step down because they really go overboard by saying mean and...

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