Study abroad program plans potential trips

Many students may not have the money or time to travel internationally during their college years, but the university offers them a chance to do just that while getting class credit. The study abroad program provides students the opportunity to experience parts of the world that they might not see otherwise. Several study abroad programs are short-term trips, but others require spending an entire semester in another country. For example, this coming spring semester, 10 students from UMHB are going to London along with nine from Howard Payne and nine from Hardin-Simmons. Professor of history and political science Dr. David Holcomb is in charge of the London Studies Program. He said, “Students will take a full load of classes from both American and British faculty. Classes meet Monday-Thursday with Friday reserved for field trips to places such as Hampton Palace, Canterbury, Bath, Cambridge, and other places in and beyond London.” They will also take a nine- day coach tour of northern England and Scotland in the middle of the semester. The College of Business is offering a spring semester abroad trip to Bangkok, which is sponsored by the Consortium for Global Education. This is the first year that the school will be taking the trip as it was canceled last year due to flooding in that region. Students can also take a trip to Israel through the College of Christian Studies during the winter term with Dr. Stephen Von Wyrick. A trip is being planned for Peru during the 2013 May term said Dr. Jim King with the College of Business. Some trips are still in the works, like a trip to Argentina during December with Dr. Michelle Reina in the College of Business. The College of Education, College of Humanities, College of Christian Studies, and the Department of Exercise and Sport Science are all planning trips for next semester. They will take place in the May, spring break or summer term. Students wanting information can contact the college. King said, “I think that the way it’s looking …right now, we could have 15 different trips that students could go on if you include graduate trips and undergraduate trips during the academic year.” For the fall semester, four students are currently in Central America in the Latin America studies program, which is through another consortium. Senior finance and accounting major Taylor Barnard traveled with the College of Business to Costa Rica last December. Before Barnard left, he and other team members went through several weeks of preparation with classes and coursework. He said, “The course was intended to familiarize ourselves with the culture so that we could better analyze...

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Cru leaders engage in peer mentoring

Welcome Week at the university is an exciting time as freshmen and transfers are welcomed onto the campus by their Cru Leaders, but their job doesn’t stop at the end of the week. Kristy Brischke, director of Transition Programs, is in charge of the peer mentoring program, the CLs and their jobs. “They serve as Welcome Week leaders as well as the big part of the peer mentor program. They continue on into the freshman seminar classes with their Welcome Week groups,” she said. CLs participate in the freshman seminar class with their students for the first eight weeks. They must keep up with their students, engage them in the campus community, encourage them and provide any resources that students might need. Welcome Week leaders return to school a week early in the semester and attend the training camp. “It’s a long five days, but I think they’ve really enjoyed it,” Brischke said. Junior education major Chad Manns, a Welcome Week steering committee member this year, thinks peer mentoring is profitable for incoming students. “This program is very beneficial because coming to a new school without family around anymore can be very stressful. This program helps the incoming freshmen know that they have someone that will be there for them and will always be available to help out in any way possible,” he said. Sixty peer mentors were a part of the program this year. Ten of them were returnees. “The CLs themselves, I think, have really enjoyed their time in pouring into students,” Brischke said. Sophomore English major Sarah Tipton and junior elementary education major Kathryn Cielonko were peer mentors for a group of freshmen this year. “Just getting to meet all the new freshmen and transfer students and helping acclimate them to the campus was the best part of it for me,” Tipton said. The training week consisted of sessions on understanding college students, role playing, team building and conversation starters. The leaders put much time into developing relationships with their students. “It seems really easy how to start a conversation, but it’s also one of those things that you kind of have to have practice on how to take it to the next level,” Brischke said. Manns said, “The peer mentors have put in a lot of time to spend with the freshmen and to really get to know about them personally as well as spiritually. It gives mentors the chance to be a great model spiritually for the freshmen to see and know that they are loved by someone.” . Something new for next year is a group of six former Cru leaders, called CL...

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Baptist denomination a key influence in American culture

UMHB is a Baptist university, but many students do not know the history of this denomination and how it has affected America and still impacts culture. The Oct. 12-13 university conference, “Baptists and the Shaping of American Culture,” analyzed the place of Baptists within the broader currents of American religious history. In 1850 there were a million Baptists, but by 1996 more than 35 million Americans identified themselves as Baptists. Professor of Christian studies, Dr. Carol Holcomb’s goal for the event was to have an insightful discussion on the Baptist denomination. “The purpose of the lecture was to bring together scholars from all over the country to discuss the role Baptists have played in American culture,” Holcomb said. Junior Christian studies major Sarah Stadler attended the lecture because Holconb asked her Introduction to Church History class to assist in welcoming the speakers and helping to check in guests. “Students should attend lectures like this because it challenges them to think on an intellectual level. It gives the student a broader knowledge of the subject because there are multiple sides to a topic,” Stadler said. One lecture “Baptists and Race,” sought to explain how Baptists have molded the country through all races and genders. Dr. Adam Bond is the assistant professor of historical studies at Samuel Dewitt Proctor School of Theology at Virginia Union University. Bond, along with Holcomb and Dr. Pamela Smoot of Southern Illinois University, served on a panel to share their thoughts on Baptists. They discussed how the denomination is ethnically and culturally diverse. “I came because I am very interested in helping to create an environment in which we can have a much broader conversation about Baptist history and Baptist life than the ones that I’ve experienced in different settings,” Bond said. African-American Baptist leaders were one focus of the lecture hosted by the College of Christian Studies. “Being here is the opportunity to represent a tradition that I study, the African-American Baptist experience,” Bond said. Baptist history is not something that students take the time to actually study, but according to Bond, it is essential. “One of the reasons that I believe Baptist history, in general, is important for students to know is because the Baptist story is very American. You talk about the early Baptists in places such as Virginia being persecuted for their beliefs, being considered outsiders, and their move to becoming prominent participants in the American story. That’s a big part of the American experience,” Bond said. Stadler thinks that Baptists should take the time to fully understand what they actually believe. She said, “I think that just like students living in...

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American icon going European

The well-known Ford mustang is possibly getting a European style makeover. While still only a concept, it is scheduled to arrive in 2014 at the New York Auto Show as a 2015 model, which is coincidentally the 50th anniversary of the pony car. According to autoguide.com, Ford said that the Mustang will be more modern because of the previous announcements about their One Ford global model policy. This means that the Mustang will be exported to markets outside of the U.S. Ford has been tight-lipped about the new pony, but the rumor mill is flooded with insider reports that it will be smaller, lighter, more fuel efficient and feature less of a retro look than the current car. Foxnews.com said that Ford is so diligent about its overseas expansion that the company will even offer a right-hand-drive version of the two-door coupe in the U.K. Some fans aren’t sure, though, that going global is a good idea for Ford. “It doesn’t seem like it’s an American-made car anymore, and that’s what people want. And that’s what I would think about when I heard ‘Ford Mustang,’” sophomore Christian studies major Ryan Morris said. The European style is very different and unique from the “classic” Mustang, and yet, it is high-class. Ford seems to be marketing to the upper class and not as much to the younger generations. As for the body of the car, junior nursing major Tim Phillips knows about the body of the muscle car. “The new style is interesting. Like so many other car manufacturers, they are trying to be on the brink of innovation and style. And the Mustang being the original pony car, they are not about to be left behind in this race. It is simply put a slim and sleeker body than the current models. They say it may end up a little shorter than current models as well,” he said. No doubt the Mustang has come a long way since 1961 when Lee Iacocca, vice president and manager of the Ford division came up with the idea. In 1964 the first Mustang rolled off the assembly line. The biggest change to the car; a new fastback model was made in 1965. It became the basis for Carroll Shelby’s GT350. The Mustang is, of course, one of Ford’s most classic and well-known vehicles, making it an American classic. Ford seems to be going over the top with this new design, possibly to compare to the new style of cars that are beginning to evolve, like the Fiat. With the new European look to correspond with the rest of the world, it is possible...

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Family continues tradition of attending UMHB
Oct02

Family continues tradition of attending UMHB

The seventeenth member of her family to attend UMHB, senior international business major Bethany Greeson has connections to the university going back to the 1920s. The first family member to attend was Flossie Stack Hudson in 1923 when UMHB was an all-girls school, and the family has followed in her footsteps. In the subsequent years, aunts, uncles, cousins, siblings and in-laws have attended the university. Originally, Bethany was unsure about continuing the tradition, but after coming to visit her older brother, alumnus Dennis Greeson, she changed her mind. “At first I did not want to continue the tradition, but after I visited the campus and spent the night with my now sister-in-law in Burt and got to be a part of Play Day the next day, I fell in love with the campus,” Bethany said. Her parents, Kevin and Holley, are both graduates of UMHB as well. Kevin was an English and history education major while Holley majored in business administration. “I loved the small classes and the personal attention that I got in the business school,” Holley said. “I loved campus life and all the different activities and the opportunity to be involved in different ministries.” Like her mom, Bethany also likes the size of the campus, as well as many other aspects of the school. “I grew up going to small private international schools, and so I really like having a smaller campus and classes. I love that UMHB has held to their values very tightly and that the professors actually care about you,” she said. Bethany went to Grace International School in Chiang Mai, Thailand, during high school. “There are so many different cultures, and I mostly attended Christian international schools, and the teachers didn’t get paid. They were volunteers who taught in the states. They really poured into your life and cared about you, your education and your walk with God,” Bethany said. Her brother and sister-in-law, alumni Dennis and Audrey Chumchal Greeson, both attended UMHB and graduated in 2010, Dennis with a degree in outdoor recreational leadership and Audrey in biblical studies. Throughout the years, the Greesons have all been involved on campus. An event that the Greesons have in common is Easter Pageant. Kevin directed it in 1984. Dennis played Jesus his senior year, and Bethany has been a cast member. Bethany is in the Miss UMHB pageant this year, an event that her mom co-directed in 1983. Her sister-in-law, Audrey, was Miss UMHB in 2007 and directed it her senior year. As teenagers, Kevin and Holley were in the same youth group back in their hometown of Portland, Texas. Kevin was two...

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