Ultimate Cru hope to be ranked
Nov15

Ultimate Cru hope to be ranked

Under the shining lights of the intramural field, students toss the disc around and play Ultimate Frisbee late into the night. Come rain, shine, sleet or snow these men and women are more dedicated to Ultimate Frisbee than the postal service is to delivering mail. Ultimate Cru was chartered five years ago, and the current captain is junior biology and chemistry  major Quy Nguyen. There are roughly 40 members of the Frisbee club, Ultimate Cru, but Nguyen said only 20 are actually committed players. The club hosts practices, which are pick-up games, at 9:30 p.m. Tuesdays and Sundays. Practices are open to anyone who has an interest in Frisbee. This year Ultimate Cru participated in two tournaments. Their goal is to become certified by the Ultimate Players Association so they can be ranked and compete regularly. Before coming to UMHB, Nguyen had never played Ultimate. He was drawn to the spirit of the game. “I actually hadn’t touched a Frisbee until I came here. I started out playing during Welcome Week. I liked it, so I kept playing. I played twice a week or more for the last two years.” The most recent tournament for Ultimate Cru was in mid-October in Houston at the Houston Amateur Sports Park. Different teams from around Texas participated, including Texas A&M, the University of Texas and Rice University — to name a few. At the tournament, Ultimate Cru’s record was 1-5. The only team they beat was Rice. Despite their lone victory, Nguyen was proud of the team. “The tournament was super fun. It was a great learning experience for those who came and a great time spent with other people who just love Ultimate. We had a lot of rookies — about half of the team,” he said Freshman nursing major Nick Cruz said, “Once you start playing, it is like a drug. You love it, especially when people start encouraging you. When you get encouraged,with Frisbee, you want to get better so you can get that same encouragement because it feels good to get good at something.” Nguyen thinks Ultimate Cru is still in its beginning stage. In order to increase the team’s level of competition, he plans to start running drills during some practices. His goal is to be UPA certified by the spring semester. “We are going to start practicing. Most of the team decided we want to start practicing and get better, especially if we want to actually be ranked as one of the top schools in our division,” he said. Ultimate is a unique sport because it has neither officials nor referees to call the game. Instead,...

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Hollywood remakes: Flukes and fakes

This years national film attendance has dropped about five percent. It is easy to blame the economy, but statistically recessions do not affect cinema attendance. The decline in cinema-goers is caused by customer dissatisfaction. Average movie-goers may have enjoyed Red Dawn when they first saw it, but they will probably not be too pleased when they see trailers for the movie again. Every year Hollywood dispenses remakes, reboots and rip-offs at an alarming rate. The Mechanic, Rise of the Planet of the Apes and Don’t be Afraid of the Dark are only a few of the examples of remakes produced in 2011. They were not successful in the box office and did not receive critical acclaim. Remakes often ruin classic films. An example of this is Alfred Hitchcock’s Psycho which was remade by director Gus Van Sant in 1998 and stared Vince Vaughn as Norman Bates. After DaVinci finished the Mona Lisa, Rembrandt did not paint his own version. He produced original work. It is not too much for Hollywood directors to show some creativity. If producers are not out spoiling a good film, they are rooting through the refuse pile of old, washed up  and terrible movies. One of the worst films remade was Rollerball. First filmed in 1975, the movie was about a dystopian future where the most popular sport was the violent Rollerball, a bizarre sport that added a motorcycle and the outrageous antics of professional wrestling to a Roller Derby. The film was a complete failure. By some fluke a remake was produced in 2002, and to no surprise the movie tanked. Even video games are being remade. Classic Nintendo 64 game, Golden Eye, was remade for the Wii, and The Legend of Zelda was remade for the Nintendo 3DS. It is cheaper for video game companies to do remakes because much of the groundwork regarding the story is done, and in some cases game play and graphics remain the same. Film companies must also buy into the notion that remakes are economical, but the current trends show that most remakes rarely break even, and most don’t make their budget. The propensity to recycle material found in the entertainment industry is an attempt to be economical. Fans do not want a reprocessed script shot with the newest acting sensation. Their desire is to be more than entertained. The Oscar-winning film The Departed is a remake of a Hong Kong film Infernal Affairs, and cult classic The Magnificent Seven is a remake of Akira Kurosawa’s Seven Samurai. These movies are not complete remakes but adaptations. The bottom line in Hollywood is sales. If producers can be...

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Campus has Perry taking presidency

Would you vote for Jesus if he were a Democrat? What if he were a Republican? In a recent Bells straw poll there were two write-in votes for Jesus — one listing him as a Democrat and  the other indicating he is a Republican. In the non-scientific poll that sought to provide a snapshot of what students are thinking, The Bells surveyed 475 students, asking them to choose their presidential candidate and also three significant social or political issues that would affect their decision in the 2012 election. With 43 percent of the votes, Texas Governor Rick Perry was the top choice. Coming in at second with 22 percent of student support was President Barack Obama. The national polls vary from the campus poll. When polled against Obama, Perry was behind him by nine points according to an AP survey. But according to national Republican candidate polls, Perry lags significantly behind the two front runners Herman Cain and former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney. Much as it was during the 1992 election, the chief issue in this election is the economy. The stakes are much higher now. In the ‘90s, unemployment was just over six percent and not on the verge of double digits as it is today. Another economic issue is the national debt. In 1992 it was just above $4 trillion. Today it is more than triple that amount at $14 trillion. Many students think Rick Perry will be able to improve the economy because he has handled Texas well by creating jobs. Junior studio art major Kate Winchell said, “I would support Rick Perry because of what I have seen him do in Texas with the economy. Moving from California to Texas was a huge eye-opener with jobs. Now that Obama is bringing the troops back, I feel that Rick Perry would be a good follow up.” Some students think Obama could benefit the country with another four years in office. Freshman sport management major Diop Johnson said, “I support Barack Obama because I feel that when he was elected in 2008, he put together some reforms in the economic system that are going to take at least eight years to develop.” Herman Cain currently leads in the Republican national polls, but on campus he only has seven percent support. Sophomore chemistry major Jason Aleman has been keeping up with the Republican debates on television. He said, “I am leaning more towards Herman Cain because I have noticed during the debates when someone points out when he is wrong, he admits to his mistake. He says he must have spoken out of error while the other candidates...

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Fitness challenge gets students involved

Campus Recreation and the staff of Mayborn teamed up to bring the campus the Fright Night fitness challenge in the gym. Twelve Students competed for a Subway gift card and the glory of being an exercise champion. The challenge happened Oct. 26  and was a 10-minute competitive workout based on the CrossFit principle, which  is a strength and conditioning regimen used by athletes. Competitors were divided into male and female groups and by classification. In ten minutes each participant was expected to perform a workout routine. Each round consisted of 10 pushups, 20 air squats, 15 sit ups and five burpees. Junior elementary education major Meredith Davis said, “I thought it was going to be easy. It just didn’t seem like there was to be a lot to do because there were only four things. Whenever you actually got into it, it got really tough, and it wore me down real quick.” The arduous workout left the competitors breathless and sweaty. The students were evenly matched and all completed five or six rounds in ten minutes. Senior exercise sport science major Logan Chaney said, “I had seen the workout on TV so I do know it was tough. Those guys pace themselves, so I went in and paced myself. … It was rough, though. I was just as tired after 10 minutes as I am after a 45-minute workout.” The challenge was meant to test participant’s fitness levels, but winner of the senior bracket public relations major Sam Williams thinks his mental toughness was also crucial to his success. “It was a test of mental strength along with your physical strength. It always helps to be fit. You just have to be tough on all aspects. Motivation makes me tough,” he said. The participants enjoyed the competition. The staff of Campus Recreation and Mayborn wanted to promote healthy life styles by making workouts fun. Director Sue Weaver said, “This gives the students an opportunity to work towards a goal, showcase their talent and compete to see how they stack up.” A very important goal of Fright Night was to instill community. Assistant Director of Mayborn campus center Stephen Morton said, “It is a fun event to get people to compete and a different kind of workout. … We are just trying to create things for students to do and get involved. I see it as an event promoting community within the campus and fellowship and, of course, incorporating fitness into it.” Before the Thanksgiving holiday staff members of Campus Recreation and Mayborn are planning a contest called Holiday Hoops. Morton said, “Holiday Hoops is a three-point shoot out kind...

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CFO offers financial advice to lower income families in community

Helping Hands Belton has many different programs that provide clothes, food, household items and some financial assistance. One program that is a recent addition is a budgeting and finance class, which is taught by the university’s Collegiate Financial Organization. Associate Executive Director Rucker Preston said, “In this case with the business school coming, they are specifically meeting a need. They are not just dropping off food. Not to say that is not needed. But they are coming to help clients in a specific way that is needed.” CFO is a student-led organization and is available to accounting, finance, economics and international business majors and minors. The focus of the organization is preparing members for the business world and facilitating a unique ministry to the poor. Dean of the College of Business Dr. Jim King said, “Broadly speaking, I feel that they represent us very professionally…They also portray us as having a heart because of their service mentality. I think it is important that businesses be seen as being engaged in the profession, but also having a heart for those in need.” Once a month, CFO members volunteer at the Helping Hands food bank and teach a budgeting and finance class. Students who are involved have received positive feedback from those enrolled in the class. The group’s president senior accounting major Christine Snodgrass said, “We put together our pilot program last year. We taught our class on personal budgeting, loans, retail scams and credit reports. Last semester we taught three separate classes. It was so successful that they went before the board of Helping Hands and said we want to do this all the time.” Instead of merely redistributing wealth, CFO in a way is redistributing education.  Senior accounting major Bob Beckworth is convicted about working with the community. CFO’s involvement with lower income families in Belton is what prompted him to become a member.   He said, “Last year they started working with the community with Helping Hands. Once they started to get involved, I really wanted to be a part and help out wherever I could.” Continuing in the trend of charity, the annual CFO Christmas party will include wrapping gifts for children.  CFO is dedicated to training members to be strong and professional business students. It is also equally dedicated to serving the poor through teaching. Faculty sponsor Tiffany Mitchell said, “We are developing and growing and open for ideas. I like the fact that it is student led. I like that they are taking initiative to go out and fulfill the mission of our...

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