English club hosts the Poe-fect Halloween party
Nov13

English club hosts the Poe-fect Halloween party

On Monday evening, Oct. 29, students and faculty members gathered at Luther Memorial for the annual Edgar Allan Poe Party. The evening was filled with food, trivia contests, Halloween music and a reading of “The Raven.” Students also had the chance to participate in the “Faux Poe” contest, where they wrote a parody of the first two stanzas of “The Raven.” Prizes were awarded for Most Humorous and Most Twisted submissions. This year marked the 25th anniversary of the first Poe Party. It is hosted each October by the UMHB English Club, a group that strives to promote literacy and a love of reading in the community. In addition to the Poe Party, the club sponsors a semi-annual book club, Shakespeare by the Pond and various community service events. However, the Poe Party is not just for English majors and members of School of Humanities. Students from every department on campus are welcome to attend the fun-filled evening. Associate Dean of Humanities and English professor Jacky Dumas has been in charge of organizing the event for the past 8 to 9 years. “I think it went well,” he said. “We had 38 total [people] in attendance throughout the night.” Senior Jesse Cade is a double major in English and history, and he serves as president of the English Club. For the party, he dressed up as a humorous depiction of the capstone to the English major class. “I enjoyed the Poe Party because we got a lot more people to come than [in] previous years,” he said. “It was also fun to see people dress up and go all out for their costumes. Someone came as a cactus. It was pretty great.” One student who attended the party is Miracle Gant, a junior English major and fine arts minor. She performed a dramatic reading of “The Raven” at the event. “I love the Poe Party because it’s a concrete example of how we can make literature real to readers. Edgar Allan Poe doesn’t have to stay in the back section of our American literature books if we don’t want him to—we can bring him out and invite him and his scholarship into our existing conventions if we so choose.” Students who missed out on the Poe Party this year don’t need to worry—it will be held again next year just in time for the Halloween...

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Crusader soccer seasons going strong
Nov13

Crusader soccer seasons going strong

Both of UMHB’s soccer teams have had an amazing season so far, and as the season comes to a close, the teams continue to succeed. So far, the men’s team has won eleven games, lost three and tied one. The women’s team has nine wins, four losses and two ties. The men are currently ranked second in the NCAA Division III West Region poll. In addition to the great team records, players from the men’s and women’s teams have had many personal achievements this season. Senior goalkeeper Travis Aday was named the American Southwest Conference (ASC) Defensive Player of the Week for the last week of August. He has played over 1,300 minutes this season, and he has had 32 saves. “This season has been great so far,” Aday said. “One of our major themes has always been about working hard every game for 90 minutes and building on our performances. We want to be playing our best soccer when November rolls around for post-season play, and a large part of that is fighting for the guy next to you at every opportunity and taking responsibility for your own actions. As long as we do that and everyone does their job, we are a great team.” Junior forward Chelsea Graham was named ASC Offensive Player of the Week for the last week of September. She has played over 930 minutes this season and has scored 10 goals. “I love soccer at UMHB because our team is all so close,” Graham said. “We are a family and we play together very well because we play for each other. There’s something different about playing for a team that is all so close because you are always having a fun time and practice seems like two hours of hanging out and playing with your best friend¬¬s.” On Monday, Oct. 22, both the men’s and women’s teams played home games at UMHB against Hardin-Simmons University. The women’s team lost 0-1, and the men’s team won their game with a 1-0 shutout. Each team will have one more season game at Sul Ross State University in Alpine on Saturday, Oct. 27. The women will play at 1 p.m. and the men will play at 3:30...

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Nursing program still growing
Nov13

Nursing program still growing

It is impossible to think about UMHB without thinking of the nursing program. This major has a higher enrollment than any other program on campus, and if you aren’t a nursing major yourself, you definitely know one. One of the most familiar sights on campus is the iconic purple scrubs that the nursing students wear. In 1903, a school of nursing was founded at Scott & White Memorial Hospital in Temple. The program was later transferred to UMHB, and in 1970, it became a baccalaureate degree program. In 1972, the first group of nursing students graduated from the program with 28 students in the class. Since its beginnings at UMHB, the nursing program has earned accreditation from the Texas State Board of Nurse Examiners, the National League for Nurses and the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education. The Scott & White School of Nursing currently has 23 faculty members as well as 57 adjunct faculty members. As of fall 2017, the program has 699 enrolled students, making it the largest on UMHB’s campus. The nursing program is housed in the Isabelle Rutherford Meyer Nursing Education Center. The state-of-the-art building is over 76,000 square feet and contains a simulation hospital, clinical labs, offices, classrooms, a chapel and other rooms that help nursing students prepare for the workforce. Junior nursing major Emily Crowson loves being a part of UMHB’s nursing program. After graduation, she hopes to work as either a labor and delivery nurse or a nurse in a neonatal infant care unit (NICU). She says that the best part of the nursing program is clinicals, where students get to practice a real-life application of their skills. “Clinicals [are] awesome. That’s my favorite part.” One of the most life-changing experiences she has had as a nursing student was witnessing and assisting with the birth of a baby. “That was the most amazing experience…I’ve ever witnessed in my life…I think that’s what made me want to try to do labor and delivery.” In addition to offering undergraduate nursing degrees, UMHB offers masters and doctorate degrees within the program. Dr. Lynn Heise serves as an assistant professor and the Interim Director of Doctor of Nursing Practice. She says that the best part of the nursing program is the simulation labs. “The faculty [members] that work in simulation are very supportive of us. The [undergraduates], before they actually get into the hospital, have already learned the skills on mannequins…so it’s not quite as frightening.” Not all nursing programs have simulation hospitals for their students to use, and by providing this for the students, UMHB has given the nursing students a competitive edge in the workforce....

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New faces on campus
Sep12

New faces on campus

Every year, UMHB excitedly welcomes new faculty members to campus. This year, the school hired 16 new members including professors and instructors. In addition to the new hires, some faculty members were promoted and given new titles. One new faculty member is Dr. Jerome Lockett, the new assistant professor in the Accounting, Economics and Finance Department. Originally from Gary, Indiana, Lockett lived in the Chicago area before coming to UMHB. He said that his favorite part of UMHB is the students. “The students brought me here…I think [the school] has one of the best student bodies I’ve ever taught.” Lockett is excited to experience UMHB traditions for the first time, especially Texas football with the Crusaders. A professor who received a new title this year is Dr. Rebecca Peterson, who is in her 14th year teaching at UMHB. In addition to being a professor in the History and Political Science Department, she is now the Interim Dean for the College of Humanities and Sciences. Her position involves overseeing the associate deans of the Schools of Humanities, Social Sciences, and Natural Sciences. She said that the best part of her job is “being able to help people as they’re planning,” as well as the opportunity to help others solve problems. Peterson also enjoys the fact that her job allows her to get to know professors and instructors in other departments that she would not otherwise have the opportunity to interact with. With the addition of the 16 new faculty members, UMHB now has 180 professors and instructors, with 23 in the McLane College of Business, nine in the College of Christian Studies, 12 in the College of Education, 58 in the College of Humanities and Sciences, 55 in the Mayborn College of Health Sciences, and 23 in the College of Visual and Performing Arts. Every class is taught by one of these talented faculty members, providing students with the quality education they deserve. Most importantly, each of the professors and instructors are followers of Christ. According to UMHB’s website, “faculty members must have not only outstanding professional credentials but also a proven commitment to teaching and mentoring students.” Using these criteria, the school carefully hires teachers that truly care about passing on their knowledge to students and helping them succeed. It is evident that the faculty members at UMHB care deeply about their classes and the students, which is one of the many reasons why the university is such a great place to go to...

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Freshman year: Overcoming hardships
Aug29

Freshman year: Overcoming hardships

Freshman year of college is one of the most unique times in a young person’s life. For the first time, they are able to leave high school, move away from home and experience a sense of independence unlike ever before. However, this transition is not complete without its own set of challenges. Mental Health America addresses some of the top issues that college students face in their first year, including schoolwork, roommates, sleep issues and homesickness. It is no secret that college is harder than high school. The classes are more intense and the course material is more in-depth. Many students find that the pressure of college classes are unbearable at times compared to high school. Sophomore criminal justice major Benjamin McCauley says that college is more challenging because “it involves teaching yourself a lot of material, while in high school, a lot more is just given to you.” Before college, most students lived at home with their parents, and may not have had any experience living with a roommate. Sharing a small space with another person can be difficult, and in order to avoid conflict and maintain a good relationship, it is important for a student to establish rules and expectations for their dorm with their roommate. Mental Health America recommends that college students get at least eight or nine hours of sleep each night. For a student that wakes up at 8 a.m., this means going to bed at midnight or earlier, which many students find difficult when they need to finish homework or are spending time with friends. “The amount of sleep I get now is much less than what I got before…it has definitely affected me negatively because I wake up more tired,” sophomore finance major Steven Neaves said. By getting enough sleep, freshmen are able to boost their energy levels, stay healthy, maintain good grades, succeed in classes and participate in extracurricular activities. One of the most common issues that freshmen experience when starting college is homesickness. For most students living on campus, going to college means that they will be living away from home for the first time. Instead of coming home at the end of the day to their house, family and pets, they come home to a small dorm room and an unfamiliar roommate. One good way to combat homesickness is to keep in touch with family and friends from back home. Additionally, by joining a club or organization and reaching out to new people, a student can make new friends and gain a sense of belonging in their new environment. Freshman year of college can feel overwhelming at times, but...

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