New faces on campus
Sep12

New faces on campus

Every year, UMHB excitedly welcomes new faculty members to campus. This year, the school hired 16 new members including professors and instructors. In addition to the new hires, some faculty members were promoted and given new titles. One new faculty member is Dr. Jerome Lockett, the new assistant professor in the Accounting, Economics and Finance Department. Originally from Gary, Indiana, Lockett lived in the Chicago area before coming to UMHB. He said that his favorite part of UMHB is the students. “The students brought me here…I think [the school] has one of the best student bodies I’ve ever taught.” Lockett is excited to experience UMHB traditions for the first time, especially Texas football with the Crusaders. A professor who received a new title this year is Dr. Rebecca Peterson, who is in her 14th year teaching at UMHB. In addition to being a professor in the History and Political Science Department, she is now the Interim Dean for the College of Humanities and Sciences. Her position involves overseeing the associate deans of the Schools of Humanities, Social Sciences, and Natural Sciences. She said that the best part of her job is “being able to help people as they’re planning,” as well as the opportunity to help others solve problems. Peterson also enjoys the fact that her job allows her to get to know professors and instructors in other departments that she would not otherwise have the opportunity to interact with. With the addition of the 16 new faculty members, UMHB now has 180 professors and instructors, with 23 in the McLane College of Business, nine in the College of Christian Studies, 12 in the College of Education, 58 in the College of Humanities and Sciences, 55 in the Mayborn College of Health Sciences, and 23 in the College of Visual and Performing Arts. Every class is taught by one of these talented faculty members, providing students with the quality education they deserve. Most importantly, each of the professors and instructors are followers of Christ. According to UMHB’s website, “faculty members must have not only outstanding professional credentials but also a proven commitment to teaching and mentoring students.” Using these criteria, the school carefully hires teachers that truly care about passing on their knowledge to students and helping them succeed. It is evident that the faculty members at UMHB care deeply about their classes and the students, which is one of the many reasons why the university is such a great place to go to...

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Freshman year: Overcoming hardships
Aug29

Freshman year: Overcoming hardships

Freshman year of college is one of the most unique times in a young person’s life. For the first time, they are able to leave high school, move away from home and experience a sense of independence unlike ever before. However, this transition is not complete without its own set of challenges. Mental Health America addresses some of the top issues that college students face in their first year, including schoolwork, roommates, sleep issues and homesickness. It is no secret that college is harder than high school. The classes are more intense and the course material is more in-depth. Many students find that the pressure of college classes are unbearable at times compared to high school. Sophomore criminal justice major Benjamin McCauley says that college is more challenging because “it involves teaching yourself a lot of material, while in high school, a lot more is just given to you.” Before college, most students lived at home with their parents, and may not have had any experience living with a roommate. Sharing a small space with another person can be difficult, and in order to avoid conflict and maintain a good relationship, it is important for a student to establish rules and expectations for their dorm with their roommate. Mental Health America recommends that college students get at least eight or nine hours of sleep each night. For a student that wakes up at 8 a.m., this means going to bed at midnight or earlier, which many students find difficult when they need to finish homework or are spending time with friends. “The amount of sleep I get now is much less than what I got before…it has definitely affected me negatively because I wake up more tired,” sophomore finance major Steven Neaves said. By getting enough sleep, freshmen are able to boost their energy levels, stay healthy, maintain good grades, succeed in classes and participate in extracurricular activities. One of the most common issues that freshmen experience when starting college is homesickness. For most students living on campus, going to college means that they will be living away from home for the first time. Instead of coming home at the end of the day to their house, family and pets, they come home to a small dorm room and an unfamiliar roommate. One good way to combat homesickness is to keep in touch with family and friends from back home. Additionally, by joining a club or organization and reaching out to new people, a student can make new friends and gain a sense of belonging in their new environment. Freshman year of college can feel overwhelming at times, but...

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