Staff editorial: Turnitin.com
Apr02

Staff editorial: Turnitin.com

THE BELLS — Turnitin.com may not be convenient for students, but many professors view it as an effective way to prevent plagiarism. As long as students continue stealing others’ intellectual property, turnitin.com may be a burden that everyone must tolerate. The website could be a necessary nuisance. It’s a pain to have to go through the process of submitting papers through the site, but due to the dishonesty that is rampant at all levels of education, it may be for the best. Some believe students should embrace turnitin.com because it could encourage their creativity. The fact that professors can see how unique one paper is from another helps students try harder to be set apart from the pack before their papers are read. However, there are some inherent flaws to the system worth noting. Some users don’t experience problems, but many do. It can become incredibly frustrating, but still others believe it’s a good concept. A lot of people don’t like turnitin.com because it doesn’t detect whether a source has been cited, leading the site to assume that every student plagiarizes. The system could be updated so it recognizes that phrases in quotation marks are cited material. As for now, it’s an unneeded source of stress and aggravation, only adding to the tension students are already coping with. Another solution could be hard copies and a face-to-face turn in. It seems to eliminate a lot of possible technical problems by handing in a hard copy. What if the Internet crashes? Turnitin.com is a massive accident waiting to happen. Unfortunately, that’s already become a reality for some users. There are multiple accounts of students uploading their papers only to have them disappear into cyber oblivion, causing professors to give students zeros or late grades in return for weeks of preparation for papers and research projects. This is a problem that should be remedied. In addition, there is a moral and ethical problem with the website. One of its main purposes is to check for plagiarism. Making students upload their papers to a website to be checked for plagiarism before they’re graded is inconsistent with the American ideal of being innocent until proved guilty. By uploading work,  students have to prove themselves innocent to receive a...

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Annual event provides play through houses
Apr02

Annual event provides play through houses

THE BELLS — By Josh Bradshaw Reaching Out, a large service project that happens once a semester on campus, provided students with many of different opportunities to give back to the community recently. One opportunity was to take playhouses to military families living in the surrounding area. Students from different groups and organizations had been building the playhouses under the sponsorship of The Campus Activities Board. Sophomore exercise sports science major Alexa Billington had been looking forward to this opportunity for over a year. “My friends got to help take the playhouses to different families last year, and I missed out. I was super jealous because they got to actually spend time with the kids and play with them in their new house.” Elizabeth McNutt, a sophomore exercise science major, and Courtney Craig, a freshman nursing major, both work for the CAB and were able to see the service project through to the end. “It has been really fun spending my week helping to build the different playhouses, knowing that I would get to deliver them to a family at the end of the week,” McNutt said. She describes the special connection she has with the military families as her dad has served with the Army since before she was born. “My heart goes out to the different recipients as I know some of what they have gone through. It can be tough when one of your parents has to go to fight in a different country, and I’m glad that I have this opportunity to help give back to families like mine.” McNutt, Craig and Billington were in the same group and were sent to a family at Fort Hood. The mother and four boys “were so excited to see us,” Craig said. “They were running up and down the street and couldn’t contain the joy that was inside of them as we pulled up with their new house in the bed of our truck. I didn’t realize the significance of what we were doing until we saw the children’s faces.“ Once playhouse was lifted off the truck, the group planned out their strategy regarding how they would raise it over the backyard fence. All the while, the four boys, ranging from 2 to 7, could not hide their joy. “It was tricky trying to get the house into the backyard because the kids were so excited,” Billington said. “It really made us realize that such a small gesture could make such a difference.“ Billington’s group made the most of the opportunity. Armed with paint and paintbrushes, provided by CAB, the students helped the boys paint their new...

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Former students, current CAB
Mar27

Former students, current CAB

THE BELLS — By Josh Bradshaw The university tries to provide a sense of community in every area of campus life. The Campus Activities Board office is no different, as Mike McCarthy and Jeff Sutton, along with their student workers, are focused on trying to make the campus feel like home to the students. The CAB Office is unique. They are responsible for most of the student events that take place on campus, ranging anywhere from the Miss MHB Pageant in the fall to the Easter Pageant that is just around the corner. What makes CAB even more unusual, however, is that McCarthy and Sutton are both alumni of UMHB. McCarthy is the director of Campus Activities, and graduated from the university in 1999, with a double major in Christian studies and psychology. As a student, he anticipated going into Christian ministry. However, with no concrete job available upon graduation, McCarthy needed work and became a substitute. After working in this role for eight months, he became the assistant director for Campus Activities. McCarthy described the position as a perfect fit for him at the time. “When I came to work for Mary Hardin-Baylor, I still knew a ton of students that were here before I graduated. I also understood the culture of the school and the expectations of the job.” McCarthy believes he would not be as successful in his position if he were not an alumnus. His position requires a strong relationship with the administration office as they both need to be on the same page during the lead-up to big events. “One of the most helpful things about working at my alma mater is that I have fantastic relationships with the administration. I know them and they know me, which means that we can both understand and trust each other more,” he said. Jeff Sutton, Assistant Director of Campus Activities, said that working for his alma mater snuck up on him at a time where he least expected it. As a student, Sutton was involved in anything and everything. Whether playing the role of Jesus in Easter Pageant, or taking part in Stunt Night all four years to even being on the Miss MHB leadership team, Sutton extended himself to as many extracurricular activities as possible. Four months after graduation, Sutton found himself working in the office responsible for planning the events he was so involved with as a student, a position that he loves. “My job is a lot of fun. Getting to see people make connections similar to mine is always a really good feeling,” he said. McCarthy and Sutton have a huge amount...

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Cru softball back in action
Feb25

Cru softball back in action

THE BELLS — by Emily Steppick Last weekend, the softball team traveled to Clinton, Miss. for a four- game series against Mississippi College. The team played a double-header  and lost the first game 3-4 along with the second 2-3. The Crusaders played a second double-header Feb. 16. The girls lost the first game 1-4 and the second 0-3. Last season the team placed third in the tournament and finished 29-16. The women ended with a 17-7 record in conference play. Sophomore Kourtney Bevers said the team prepared well for the season. “As far as pre-season/fall ball, we did a lot of different training as far as conditioning to get us in better shape. We did CrossFit and a lot of circuits work in the weight room.” The Lady Cru have full potential to dominate ASC play adding new talent to the experienced returners. “We have a lot of freshmen that came in, so I think just the competitive atmosphere of our team has heightened because nobody’s spot is set in stone.” After pitching every game in her high school career, Bevers was recruited as a pitcher for the Cru. However, last season she started as a center fielder. Bevers said she chose number 10 both this season and last season because she likes to wear the same number in softball as she wears in basketball. The atmosphere of the softball program is one that allows the players to have fun and be competitive at the same time. “Softball honestly feels like a family here. There’s not a person I don’t get along with, and the coaches make the competitive environment a fun place. Another big thing I like is that we pray before every game and strive to reflect God in the way we play.” Bevers is working on a major in art and visual communications along with a minor in marketing. After graduation, she can see herself pursuing a career in sports advertisement logos or in interior design. Junior left fielder Janie Neyland agrees with Bevers. “The team went through hardcore workouts in the fall to prepare for this season,” Neyland said.  “This year there are a lot of freshmen, creating a very young team.” Before playing for the Crusaders, Neyland played softball throughout high school and played for a select softball team. So she knows what it takes to be successful in the sport. “The key to winning games this year will be having high intensity throughout the whole game and trying to string all our hits together.” The chemistry between the players is one that is hard to describe because even though some of them have...

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Students lead charge in war to end human trafficking
Feb25

Students lead charge in war to end human trafficking

THE BELLS — by Josh Bradshaw We live in a world where most people view slavery as a significant part of America’s history, something that has tainted this country’s past. However, according to The Washington Post, slavery is still a very real problem, with 30 million people trafficked today. The Freedom Movement, a campus organization, is doing its part to let as many people know as possible by hosting a week-long event that will culminate Friday. Alec Lloyd, a junior business management major, is the vice president of Freedom Movement. His position means that he spends his time focusing on how to implement the organization’s main goals. He describes them as  “rais(ing) money, awareness and discipleship against human trafficking.” Andi Hale is extremely passionate when it comes to issues like human trafficking. On a mini-hiatus from UMHB, Hale is spending this semester working for Show Hope, a nonprofit organization that provides adoption grants in Franklin, Tenn. She believes every campus should have different student organizations that empower students by giving information, accompanied with an action plan to help tackle issues like slavery. Hale said, “Freedom Movement is important for college campuses because we are raising awareness and funds to bring an end to this horrible injustice.” Hale said it is important for college students to be aware of the issue of modern slavery so they can lead their peers in a battle to war against the ongoing injustice. “By educating college students on the issue of human trafficking, we are raising up the next generation to fight for those who are being exploited and make an impact for the Kingdom.” One way that Freedom Movement aims to accomplish its goals this semester is through End It Week. Lloyd and his team have focused their energy on this week’s events to raise awareness to the campus as well as the surrounding community. Ross Jones, a sophomore psychology major, is in charge of promotions for Freedom Movement. He hopes as many people as possible on campus will get involved. “I hope that this week will motivate college students to fight for something greater than themselves,” he said. Jones explained the significance of the week they had chosen. End It Movement, a global organization that has a big voice in the battle against human trafficking, is encouraging as many people as possible to draw a big, red “X” on their hand Feb. 27. They hope that it will raise awareness to the issue of human trafficking. On Thursday, Jones hopes students will join with End It Movement and mark their hands. Lloyd and others will have markers at their booth in the...

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