A minute with the Love Guru

Think you have love figured out? University chaplain, Dr. George Loutherback, talks about Valentine’s Day and strengthening relationships. Q: How do you know when you’re “in love”? •    A: It’s different things for different people. For me, it was not a moment that I knew, but a process of getting to know (wife) Cindy and sensing her heart. Then God began to warm my heart with hers. It was then we realized this was love. Q: How did you win your wife’s heart? •    A: When we talked about our future and what we hoped to see, I think she saw in me a person that she could respect, a person that she could support his career and be a helper to me, not a competitor. Q: What advice do you have for  young couples in a relationship? •    A: Spend time together, communicate together and just get to know each other. Don’t react on impulses and don’t react on emotions. Spend the time to really get to know the individual and who they are. God will reveal to you if it’s the right one for you or not. Q: What is Valentine’s Day for you? •    A: “Valentine’s Day is a time to say, ‘Hey, I just want to tell you how much I love you and how much I appreciate what you mean to me and all you do in my life.’” Q: What do you think the color red symbolizes for Valentine’s Day? •    A: “HOT! And smokin’!” Dr. L believes Valentine’s Day is meant to be spent around the ones you love. •    “I think Valentine’s Day should be a time for couples. If you’re dating or with your significant other, . . . spend some time affirming each other and just telling each other what you appreciate. It’s the best gift. At times we get so busy that we very rarely take time to affirm each other in a personal way, and those are the special...

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Preston Gilchrist’s series ‘Daughters of Eve,’ overlooked Biblical characters

By Lauren McKenzie Displayed among the books on the second floor of the Townsend Memorial Library are a series of religious portraits by Preston Gilchrist, an art professor and director at the River Oaks Art Center in Alexandria, La. The showcase, which was created to symbolize over-looked women in the Bible, is entitled “Daughters of Eve.” The series made its debut Jan. 12. Faculty, staff and students were invited to attend. Dean of the College of Visual and Performing Arts and longtime friend of Gilchrist’s, Ted Barnes, owns several of the artist’s pieces and went to the opening night of the exhibit. “I was in Louisiana back in the summer, and I saw the beginnings of the work,” Barnes said, “I really liked the show, so I thought why don’t we don’t we do a show at UMHB?” The images of “Daughters of Eve” have been compiled from old, black and white Victorian photographs that Gilchrist searched for at several different flea markets as well as online at e-Bay. “Very soon into collecting these photographs, I knew I wanted to do a personal project with them,” Gilchrist said, “but (I) did not have a clear idea what the pieces would look like. This project was one that took a long time to develop.” Unlike a normal photograph, the works are created through a process called cyanotyping. To create a cyanotype, a light sensitive solution is mixed together and painted on paper. After the solution dries overnight, digitally created negatives are taken and contact printed onto the paper. The women depicted in Gilchrist’s pieces are unspecified. Art Professor Hershall Seals said the anonymity behind the paintings adds to their originality. “He doesn’t know the names of the women in the photographs,” Seals said of Gilchrist’s work, “which makes it mysterious because you’re looking at this anonymous person, and they’re representing somebody from the (Old) Testament, like Rachel, for example.” Gilchrist focuses on portraying women in the Bible who play important roles but are often unnamed, like the mothers, sisters and wives of more familiar characters. He said his work is not finished. “I will continue to make more pieces in this series,” Gilchrist said. “As a matter of fact, my ultimate goal is to have a piece for every woman mentioned in the Bible. I also fully expect the pieces to look different over time, and while I do not have any specific ideas how they will look, it is the process itself which holds my interest.” His series will be displayed in the Townsend Memorial Library until Feb....

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Christmas trips go far beyond visits to grandmother’s house
Jan27

Christmas trips go far beyond visits to grandmother’s house

By Patrick McDonald Many memories are associated with Christmas. For some, it is that feeling of wonder as they plummet downstairs like a bullet toward the Christmas tree. Most would then tear open their presents, but this did not happen for some. Students from the university traveled the world during Christmas break as missionaries with GoNow. Sophomore social work major Stacey Davidson went to East Asia. The work that she did there was beneficial to the people in many ways. “My team taught English for a week at middle school and got a chance to really love on all of the students and teachers there,” Davidson said. “The next week, we hosted English at a local university and built some relationships with the students for the short amount of time that we had left. Most of our job, however, was to encourage and strengthen our host, who was a Chinese Christian at the middle school where we taught.” She also had the chance to minister to a university student there. She met Lindsay, who spoke very English well. “I got to know her pretty well and found out that she was not a Christian, but she knew who Jesus was because of her Christian mother,” Davidson said. “We had to leave soon after, but I told her that I was a Christian as well. The next day, I had hopes of seeing Lindsay, but no way to contact her. Soon after arriving at the same university, a student randomly began a conversation with me, inviting me up to her dorm room in the process. It was Lindsay’s room. This really showed me that God was definitely at work among us and in me. He placed me where he wanted me.” Students traveled around the world to minister to people. Senior psychology major Tania Riveria went to Serbia. She helped distribute Bibles and build relationships with the people, in conditions very different from East Asia. “It was really, really cold. Everybody spoke a language we did not. We were like fish out of water,” Riveria said. “They put us to shame of how much history they know. I learned a lot about their history.” Riveria had opportunities to spread the Gospel while she was there. “We were doing something with Bibles in the square, and for the most part could not understand what they were saying. But there was a lady and she came up and said, ‘A Bible for me, really?’ She was just in awe that we would give her a Bible because she has never had a Bible in her life. And she said, ‘That’s the best...

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Pause for Thought: Fantasy Football

By Joshua Thiering Everyone keeps asking me, what are you going to do when you graduate this month? Well I’ve made up my mind to pursue a career as a professional football player. Never mind that I only have two years of playing backup safety on the Grisham Middle School A-Team under my belt. I’ve seen Rudy. Michael Jordan was cut from his high school basketball team. Skeptics will tell me, “Josh, you are 6-foot-2, 170 pounds and always seem to be awkwardly bumping into door frames instead of moving through them.” Well, prepare to be baffled, all you armchair critics, who claim they don’t even make shoulder pads small enough to fit me. I will wear as many T-shirts as it takes to fill out the pads. And for the record, whenever I accidentally collide with the door frame, I always get a better piece of it than it does of me. To all of you who still remain unconvinced of my athletic potential and make allegations that I move slower than FEMA — stop treading on the egg shells of my dreams! I’ve got things going for me. Things like inspirational quotes and motivational posters. I’ve spent thousands of hours watching football on TV, and I’m open to criminal activity. To be a professional athlete, you need to have a big ego. Well, my ego belongs in the hall of fame right next to Muhammad Ali, and Chad, I-can-swim-faster-than-Michael- Phelps Johnson. Furthermore, if I were ever interviewed, I could say politically incorrect things, and string together sporting cliché after cliché, by calling my own number when the going gets tough in this game of inches. I’ve spent many late nights sprinting through my living room carrying the pigskin, juking the coffee table, hurdling the remote and breaking imaginary tackles. I’ve even played pickup football with real people a couple of times since eighth grade, but the results have been mixed. Often times I’ve wondered if I’m getting slower or if fat people are getting faster. According to my astute roommate, who always tells the truth, it’s the latter. So, naturally, I will just eat myself into top-playing condition. I will use the local church flag football league as a spring board to the pros, by racking up bloated statistics and putting forth every possible effort to win each game so that pro scouts will have to take notice. I expect nothing less than to become an overnight YouTube...

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Holidays & Festivities
Dec09

Holidays & Festivities

By Lindsay Schaefer Family and friends gather to observe Christmas all around the world by celebrating the holiday in many different ways. At UMHB, students highlight Christmas with special programs and activities during the holiday season. One of the first events was Crusader Christmas Dec. 4 with the lighting of the Luther Memorial. Students watched the movie Elf, drank hot chocolate, ate Christmas cookies and took pictures with Santa. Each of the women’s dorms hosted a mother-daughter weekend. They had dessert parties, Christmas caroling, various activities and games. Friday night, several male students added to the festivities by singing “Christmas Grams” to the students and moms, starting in Burt Hall. After a calm breakfast together, Saturday was left open for mothers and daughters to go Christmas shopping, watch a movie or participate in any other activity. To continue the Christmas spirit, the music department presented Jewels of the Season, its annual Choral Christmas Gala at First Baptist Church Belton. The night included many traditional Christmas carols such as “Joy to the World,” “Deck the Halls” and “Hark the Herald Angels Sing.” The choir also sang Assistant Professor of music Matt Crosby’s special arrangement of “Jingle Bells.” Tonight, the UMHB Instrumental Christmas Concert will be presented in the Mayborn Campus Center Arena at 7 p.m. It will offer a compilation of pieces by The Conservatory of Music Suzuki Groups and The Bell County Symphonic Band. The traditional pancake supper for students will take place Dec. 11 at 9 p.m. in Hardy Hall. Faculty and staff will serve the breakfast food to students. In the small town of Salado, the Christmas season is altered into a winter wonderland. Hundreds of lights hang from all the local businesses, and shopping and seasonal music are available. Locally there is the Belton Lake Outdoor Recreation Area present, Nature in Lights XII: A Holiday Tradition. This includes five miles of Christmas cheer for all to enjoy. For every car, mini-van and pick-up there is a $5 charge. Wrapping up the season, the College of Visual and Performing Arts recorded “Jacob Marley’s Christmas Carol,” to air on KNCT radio, 91.3 FM. It will be broadcast on Christmas Eve at 7 p.m. and Christmas Day at 10...

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