‘Beware the Jabberwock…’

By Joshua Thiering In a watershed moment for modern anthropology, a group of men from Georgia claimed they had found Bigfoot. However, when placed under the intense eye of scrutiny, the dead body of the monster was found to be — a rubber gorilla costume. The Bigfoot hoax of 2008 means only one thing. The monster is still at large and could be on campus. No official sightings of Bigfoot have yet to be recorded at UMHB according to the Director of Campus Police, Gary Sargent. However, many students suspect paranormal occurrences on campus are not infrequent. “I think I saw the Chupacabra in the Sesquicentennial Plaza in mid scurry,” sophomore Micah Lynch said. For those of you who aren’t “in the know,” the Chupacabra is a monster from Puerto Rican lore best known for attacking and sucking the blood of goats. Lynch agreed that the sighting has left him with a growing concern for the safety of unaccompanied girls walking through the plaza at night. Lynch did not mention, however, that if the girls were accompanied by goats, it would actually increase their chance of being attacked by the Chupacabra. *NOTE: Girls should not take goats for walks late at night through the Sesquicentennial Plaza. * Side Note: Wouldn’t “Raising Chupacabra awareness for the goat owners near the Sesquicentennial Plaza” be a great platform for the Miss Mary Hardin-Baylor Pageant? Pageant entries may never get the chance if Lynch gets his way. “I would like to set a trap to catch the Chupacabra. Maybe we can have a march, form a mob and get pitch forks,” he said. However, pitch forks are not available in bulk at Wal-Mart. There is no word yet if Lynch plans to take this issue before the Student Government Association. In other news of the paranormal, senior Brandon Blackshear saw a falling star the other day, but thought it “might not have been a falling star.” Junior Lindsay Hunt claims she has seen more falling stars than usual lately. Could an alien invasion be underway? Not likely. Hunt also claimed that she was the “tooth fairy.” Hunt has yet to take a DNA test. There was not much evidence to support the claim of a possible alien invasion except for a faculty member who commented off the record that some of the freshmen “look like aliens.” There are many theories circulating on campus; however, no hard evidence has been found to support any of the claims. Until more develops, keep an eye out for Bigfoot, and keep goats out of the Sesquicentennial Plaza. It’s better to be safe than...

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Free vaccinations encourage healthier living

By Angel Bell Students are busy, but in a world full of germs and disease waiting to attach themselves to flesh, it is important to make an effort to prevent sickness by vaccinations. Sophomore sociology major Stacey Davidson believes they are a great idea. “It’s important for students to get vaccinated in order for them to have the best health possible,” she said, “especially at school where diseases have a tendency to travel fast.” The university offered several vaccines in a free shot clinic this month. Sophomore nursing major Megan Skarpa thinks clinics are a good way to help control sickness on campus. “When someone is vaccinated, it not only is a good health choice for them but those around them,” she said. “Being in college, viruses travel fast, and it’s important to take care of yourself and also those around you. The free shot clinic is a very good idea because college students typically do not have a lot of money to spend.” At the clinic on Sept. 29, students were offered five vaccinations. The shots were only available on a first come first served basis and included the meningitis, Gardasil, hepatitis B, MMR (measles, mumps, and rubella) and tetanus booster vaccines. Many students may not be familiar with the newer Gardasil vaccine, which is used to help prevent certain strains of the human papilloma virus (HPV) and cervical cancer. UMHB Nurse Debbie Rosenberger believes this vaccine has potential to help protect women against cervical cancer, but she also thinks that people must carefully consider what is done with their own body. “If you are female up to age 26, it is recommended that you receive the Gardasil vaccine,” she said. “You can insure your personal health habits. What you can’t control is your future mate. (Because of) poor choices, this person could carry HPV and give it to you without any symptoms themselves. Then you develop cervical cancer.” The meningitis vaccine is recommended for students living in campus housing. Rosenberger thinks it is better to get rid of a disease before it happens and is looking to attract students to the free clinics who are not able to pay for vaccines. “Prevention beats intervention any day of the week,” she said. “The purpose of (a) shot clinic is to enable those who can’t afford the vaccines to get them. If folks are under-insured, meaning they have insurance but it does not cover vaccines, then they can come.” Rosenberger also recommends an alternate program for younger students. “Any 18-year-old falls under the federal program (called) Vaccines for Children,” she said. This allows them to “receive immunizations at the...

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Hispanic independence culture draws awareness
Sep30

Hispanic independence culture draws awareness

By Krystle Danuz “La fe mueve montanas”; faith moves mountains. With this message in mind, El Grito, the Mexican cry of independence from Spanish rule was yelled out in 1810. Beginning in mid-September and running through Oct. 15, Hispanics all around the world are celebrating independence, freedom and justice. A cultural event on campus hosted by Professor of social work, Dr. Jose Martinez, honored the president for the Heart of Texas chapter of The League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC) and community leader, Jose (Joe) Landez for his contributions to the Hispanic public. Also honored was director and treasurer of the Multi-Ethnic Cultural and Arts Association (MECA), Dr. Daniel Kott, for his continuous work in cultural music and dance education. Martinez spoke of Hispanic holidays that are integrated into the American culture and thus have created a unity between Spanish and Texas customs.( Of the main Hispanic cultures that are unified with the state is that of Mexico.) Martinez said that Cinco de Mayo, the Mexican national holiday that commemorates victory over the French army, for example, is celebrated throughout Mexico and America because 60% of all Hispanics are Mexican-American. The celebration is received all over the world because “We (Latinos) recognize each other as far as our heritage is concerned. We appreciate each other,” Martinez said. But Cinco de Mayo is more than an anniversary of independence. “The significance is … the idea that some people that are poor, sometimes powerless, can accomplish and can achieve,” he said, “in particular, against those who are powerful.” Joe Landez is helping to educate individuals about Spanish cultures and expose the contributions, which he feels have often gone unnoticed, made by Latins in American history. “I do have a story, and I do have a passion,” Landez said. “As I was growing up down the Rio Grande Valley (in) McAllen, we felt, I felt, we were not Americans. We refer to other folks that are not Mexicans as Americanos. … with that negative self-esteem, we were conditioned to believe that we were not part of the system. I thought of myself as a non-Americano.” Landez soon came to the realization that he, too, was American, but his Hispanic culture that was a part of his identity was being underrepresented in society. Mexican stereotypes were abundant, and he thought he was looked at negatively. “My passion began to ignite about me and my “raza,” my race,” he said. After spending 18 years in the Army, Landez was drafted into the race relations field where he learned a great deal about Hispanics and their largely overlooked participation in American history. “We were...

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The Magnificent Seven: the last of the rec majors

By Joshua Thiering You may have seen them around campus with Nalgenes dangling from their backpacks and Chocos strapped to their feet. They have an unofficial motto: “Getting paid to do what you would do for free.” But all is not well. They are  an endangered species, nearing extinction as each semester passes—similar to the Santa Cruz long-toed salamander. Only seven recreation majors remain, according to Bethany Chapman, the Institutional Research coordinator. The last granules of sand are filtering through the tear-drop shaped hourglass. The expected graduation date for the official last recreation major is May 2010, according to Jamey Plunk, recreation adviser. The program stopped accepting students in the Spring of 2007 due to accreditation guidelines, Plunk said. Because of the guidelines, “All we could do was have a minor. So we beefed up the minor from 18 to 24 hours, and that was the end of the recreation major.” Plunk added, “I know there were a lot of kids who were disappointed about that. It’s a very marketable field.” With a degree in recreation, students can get a job in resorts and leisure, cruise lines, city parks, National Parks and Wildlife and therapeutic recreation. Only two students were pursuing a degree in recreation in 2002 when Plunk came to UMHB. Upon his arrival, Plunk received permission from the department head to revamp the recreation program. When they pumped up the classes offered, numbers swelled to 35-40 students. They added classes like Adventure Racing, Triathlon Training and Rock Climbing, and the numbers increased. Plunk thought much of this was due to UMHB’s location. It takes “only five minutes to get to one lake, and ten minutes to get to another. We can go down two rivers, and there are camping places everywhere around here. The weather for the most part is cooperative 80-90 percent of the year, and business opportunities are incredible,” he said. Recreation majors may be a dying breed, but they are still incredibly optimistic about their futures. “Even on the worst of days, I will still be surrounded by nature and the activities I love,” senior recreation major Andrew Dickerson said. “In this career, I will be able to not only spend my spare time, but my life doing what I love.” After graduation Dickerson plans to open a bed and breakfast in Brazil. Lindsay Derringer chose the recreation major because she wanted to go into camp ministry. Now her aspirations have shifted. “I want to be Dr. Plunk. I want to go to Colorado State University and teach classes in the recreation field. I would love to go and do what Plunk does,” Derringer...

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Abortion devalues human life, throws away God’s greatest gift

By Laura Beth Gebhardt It’s made the headlines before. A mother is tried for murder after leaving her baby to die in a trash can outside of a hospital. Seeing something like this leaves most people shocked. They can’t understand how someone could be so heartless. Yet, the same people are accepting of abortion. Despite what some may say, they are both murder. The heartbeat of a baby begins between the eighteenth and twenty-fifth days, and brain waves have been recorded as early as 40 days. The baby itself is fully developed, fingernails and eye lashes included, by 11 weeks. This is around the time that the average abortion is done. The definition of murder is, “to kill with premeditated malice.” Is this not the same thing as abortion? Recently, a new form of abortion has been introduced, known as induced labor abortion. In this procedure, labor is prematurely induced as late as six months into the pregnancy, and after the baby is born alive, it is left to die, sometimes in the soiled utility room. Sometimes it takes several hours. How can this not be considered murder? Presidential candidate Barack Obama does not oppose this procedure. On the contrary, he defends it. How a person can not be appalled and completely against this practice is beyond understanding. Voters give the president power, not only power over themselves but over the lives of thousands of defenseless babies. Anyone aspiring to lead this country should be closely scrutinized as to how they value the lives of the unborn. Throughout history, killing another human has never gone by without notice. It is a serious crime, and it has severe consequences. A study done by Elliot Institute of post-abortion patients, found that 61.3% of women experience guilt, 37.9% deal with anxiety, 31.6% have suicidal feelings and 43.6% deal with self-hatred. The guilt that faces post-abortion women is overwhelming and shows that their conscience knows that what they have done is wrong. It affects their thoughts, emotions and the way they live their everyday lives. Jeremiah 1:5 says, “Before I formed you in the womb I knew you; before you were born I sanctified you; I ordained you a prophet to the nations.” God knew everyone by name before they were conceived, and taking the life of someone He created is something that people shouldn’t have the choice to do. The lives of humans are in His hands, and not something people should try to control.  Every life has a purpose and is precious in the eyes of God. Some would argue that people who are pro-life are against women having a choice....

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