Pumpkin Patch
Nov04

Pumpkin Patch

Freshman art major Kaylee Wideman (left) and freshman nursing major Nathan Johnson compete in Hardy Hall’s annual pumpkin carving contest. Some of the orange squash featured funny faces, leaves, Luther Memorial and many other tributes to fall.

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Corporate corruption hurting us all

By Jordan Gustin Here’s a riddle. How does Congress solve a problem in America? They throw taxpayer money at it and hope it sticks. Since a riddle is a solution shrouded in a mystery, this answer wasn’t much of a riddle. Congress’ nonchalant mismanagement of our money has long been known. They explain their reason for spending during times when saving is needed, but even the blind could see right past the greed and corruption that grins beneath. When a CEO is laid off due to corruption in a corporate scandal, no one is surprised. When a congressman is put on trial for accepting gifts and is found guilty, no one is shocked. So why does everyone allow these CEOs and congressmen to handle their money and spend it freely? It happens because of the corrupt mindset most people unknowingly accept growing up. From a young age, Americans are taught that if they become very rich, they have a right to hoard all of that money for themselves. They’ve earned it. We reward wealth in America. The problem is that most of the rich people in our country haven’t worked very hard to get it. Why is it that we praise our teachers, police officers, fire fighters and military personnel as heroes but pay them next to nothing? Why allow our least respected paper-pushers and money-manipulators to make more money than anyone else simply by “knowing people who know people?” Haven’t the real heroes earned more than just respect? Something is very wrong with this picture. It’s time for a change. Democrats and Republicans alike have caused this problem. Corporate giants have paid our congressmen and congresswomen copious amounts of cash to vote in their favor. Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac were doing this for more than 10 years until they were taken over by the Federal Reserve in September along with other companies. Then the issue of a bailout came up. Once again, Congress predictably infused cash into the bloodstream of the problem — $800 billion (and counting) to be precise. In the process of deciding whether or not to pass the bailout, Congress uncovered some shady characters. Take for example Richard Fuld, former CEO of Lehman Brothers, who knew his company was going bankrupt and still decided to keep $480 million plus additional payouts. Still living in a $14 million oceanfront villa with a million-dollar art collection, he complained to Congress that he didn’t get any severance pay and that he lost more than $10 million. Congressman Waxman set Fuld straight by reminding everyone, “You made all this money taking risks with other people’s money.” So why...

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Re-enactors straddle Civil War past, present in mock battles
Nov04

Re-enactors straddle Civil War past, present in mock battles

By Joshua Thiering First Hand Account One would be surprised by the thoughts that run through the mind when lying on the ground playing dead after succumbing for the second time during a Civil War re-enactment. A young recruit to the Confederates was one casualty who just happened to conveniently run into Union soldiers in front of a bleacher full of modern onlookers. I was the young recruit participating in the Battle of Ogletree Bay in Copperas Cove, Texas. While dying, this private wasn’t thinking about home and country, his lady, or who would look after his sister. He was thinking, “Why did I die with my face staring at the sun? I wish they had sunscreen back then. The next time I die, I will be more careful.” Like Lazarus, I died twice. The second time was much more convincing. Though the enemies were aiming above and away from the Confederates (for safety), a rogue Union “bullet,” powered by destiny, struck my chest, causing a violent effect. The redeeming thing about re-enactments is that participants die at their own discretion, and nobody want s to be the first to die. This spat of necrophobia led to 15 minutes of fighting without a single casualty. “It must have taken the soldiers about 15 minutes to perfect their aim,” Noelle Renfro, a spectator, said. The smoke from the rifle and cannon fire put a fog over the hard-fought territory of Ogletree Gap, a city park in Copperas Cove. The smell of sweat and gunpowder assaulted soldiers’ nostrils. As I was loading the rifle, cannon fire startled me. I poured half of the gunpowder down the barrel of the gun and the other half down the collar of my shirt. The blackened collar now served as a badge of rattled nerves. In order to load a Civil War era rifle, infantrymen have to pull a pouch of gun powder out of their back holster, tear a hole in the top, pour it down the barrel, and put a small cap over the pin while half cocked. Many of the men use their teeth to tear the powder pouch. Following their example, as a baby-faced private I earnestly bit a little too hard into my packet, getting a mouthful of gunpowder, which tasted like dirt. Once dead, I watched as Union soldiers walked past after the retreating Confederates. I began to entertain thoughts of last-second heroics. I could just climb to my feet daringly and fire shots with my pistol at the backs of the enemies as if I wasn’t really dead. I could even yell, “Die you bluecoat scum. I was...

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Pause for thought: Decision 2008
Oct21

Pause for thought: Decision 2008

By Joshua Thiering Big questions loom as we barrel down the homestretch of 2008. Big questions like: What should I major in? Who should I vote for? Should I get a hair cut? Well, don’t fret my little fretting freshman. I’ve got some answers for you. But they aren’t about silly things  the “main stream media” covers like majors and presidential elections. Instead, like Santa, or the three wisemen (if your feeling preachy), I come bearing gifts to those who care about their hair. These gifts are in the form of a point counter point of the ever important issue of hair cuts. Pro: Hey you, get a haircut. Your head looks like a mangy cat. Call the vet! Haircuts make it look healthy, and you’ll get less dandruff — a win-win situation for everyone. The Bird’s Nest is not just the stadium where the Olympics were held. It’s your head! Shave it, you haggard, kinky-haired Chia Pet. A hair stylist should hijack your hair.  Your hair is an abomination. It ruins your witness. Think about God.  Think biblically. Your mother tells your grandmother it’s time to get the shears.  We will cheer if you shear! “Your hair looks like a bush,” said senior Andrew Dickerson, who is a reliable source of unreliable sources. Cut your hair.  It isn’t famous. It’s infamous. You look like Saddam Hussein when they pulled him out of his hole. You were seen on campus and thought to be Bigfoot. Con: No, don’t shear thy righteous bangs. Thou long, flowing mane doth glow in the sun’s golden rays. Doth the shaved lion roar as loud? Nay, my friend. Your hair is a liberation; let us drink from its cup. The barbers are the truly barbarous. Maybe your hair has gone hay-wire. What is wrong with that? The armed services shave the heads of enlistees to maintain uniformity. They want you to be part of the mass. Be bold. Celebrate your differences. Grow it long and strong. Paint with all the colors of the wind. Or, better yet, think biblically. Delilah is waiting around ever corner, waiting to sap your strength. Take a walk on the wild side. Business in front, party in the back, isn’t merely the mullet. It’s the Missouri Compromise. You look like a mop head, but mops clean things. So what if you look like you stuck your fingers in a light socket? It’s only a testament to your electric personality. Oliver Herford once said, “A hair in the head is worth two in the brush.” Grow it long before it all falls out. Conclusion: As you can tell, by column...

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Couple tag-teams in Chapel
Oct21

Couple tag-teams in Chapel

By Joshua Thiering Students’ attentions were wrangled and corralled when Candice Meyers, a Christian country singer and former Miss Kansas, and her husband, Rope, a world champion steer wrestler, spoke to students recently during chapel services. Candice Meyers sang and interjected personal words of wisdom to the students. Her first song was dedicated to the “World Changers.” “Have a little faith. You can move a mountain,” she sang. Rope Meyers, whose father was also a world champion steer wrestler, spoke about his history of roping when he was a young adult. He also jokingly dispensed a little marriage advice saying, “When you get married, you find that you lose half of your vocabulary, because your wife has the other half.” Using the illustration of Jesus as a river flowing forth, he emphasized that Christians should have a bottomless faith. “God needs you at a place where you are not ankle deep … you need to move to that place where there is no bottom, where you cannot stand.” With a name like Rope, one could say Meyers was destined to become a cowboy. He said, “It is on my birth certificate: Rope Meyers. My sister’s name is Tie and brother’s name is Cash. They named us that way because you rope the calf, you tie the calf, and you win the cash.” He added, “My dad was a world champion steer wrestler when I grew up. So I wanted to do the same thing. Every little kid wants to play cowboys and Indians. I just got to do it with a real horse.” Where Meyers draws inspiration from his father, Candice Meyers finds inspiration from her favorite country music artist, Martina McBride, and her heroes from her hometown who have walked with God successfully for a long time. “I look at them, and they are 40 years married, their children are raised and grown and they are just as passionate about God as they ever were,” Candice said. Senior history education major Amanda Jane Foss said of the hour—long performance, “I liked that she explained the meaning of her songs, and the significance that they had in her own life.” She also enjoyed listening to Rope’s talk. Foss said, “I really liked that Rope talked about it being a long journey, of just walking day by day, moment by moment with Jesus—that you might walk a thousand steps and only be ankle deep, and keep going and walk another thousand steps until you get to that place where Christ is in control of every aspect of your life.” Other students were a bit more critical. “I thought she wasn’t...

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