Obama wins presidential election
Nov04

Obama wins presidential election

By Mateo Gamboa and Stuart Platt The Bells staff has decided to do something it has never done before. We are doing live coverage of the 2008 presidential election and will be updating this page hourly after 7:00 p.m. with student reactions, results, and other useful information. 7:46 p.m. With over 16 million votes counted, McCain is leading in the popular vote by 1 percent and Obama has control over more electoral votes with 82 as opposed to McCain’s 34. Freshman Hayley Shaffer is indifferent to each candidate but said, “If I had to pick a president, I would pick McCain.” 9:02 p.m. Sen. Barack Obama seems to be pulling ahead of the race with 206 electoral votes. Students comment back and forth as they anxiously await the election results trickling through the stereo speakers of the television screen. “I think it’s probably going to be Obama. It seems pretty stacked now against McCain,” freshman Justin Rippy said. Rippy did not vote in this election due to the hassle of absentee voting. “I’m not really a voter,” he said. “I’m just not that interested in this election. If I was home, I probably  would’ve voted.” Though Rippy and his friends seemed interested in the results of the election, they were fairly apathetic toward the outcome. “I would’ve probably written in Mickey Mouse on the ballot,” he said. “I guess Obama is the lesser of the two evils. Maybe we’ll get a tax break.” Rippy and his friends watched Monday night football last night in which the Redskins lost to the Steelers. “I guess we’ll see what happens,” he said. “The Redskins lost, and it was all downhill from there. Every time the Redskins have lost historically for the last 17 elections the party has changed hands.” 9:51 p.m. Obama is still looking strong with 207 electoral votes and 51 percent of the popular vote, but McCain remains a contender with his lead in Texas and a stand-still in Florida. McCain has 135 electoral votes and 48 percent of the popular vote thus far. The 270 mile-marker is quickly approaching for Obama, and with most of the west coast still up for grabs, a win looks likely. Sophomore Mandi Sanders voted early this year in Austin and feels nervous about the outcome of this election. She said, “I don’t want us to become a socialist nation.” 9:57 p.m. Sen. Barack Obama has just been elected president of the United States of America. Students in the SUB huddled around the TV in anticipation of the final election poll results and celebrated wildly with the announcement of the new president. Sophomore Obama...

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Pause for thought: Roommate Woes
Nov04

Pause for thought: Roommate Woes

By Joshua Thiering The door opens, and in walks old bad news herself. It’s that roommate who always gets on your nerves. She plops down on the sofa, groaning, making a point to let everyone know how miserable her life is. Soon the groans will be drowned out by Lauryn Hill, whining over her laptop speakers. “Killing me softly, with his song, killing me softly,” she sings along with the chorus. Ironically, however, it’s really you she is killing softly. Perhaps you have a roommate like this one. Like a badger, their tracks can be spotted a couple of ways. They usually live in your living room and never leave. They only speak to you negatively, and ask you a lot of questions when you’re walking out the door like: “Where you are going? And why do you never make time for me?” With the housing process quickly approaching, switching roommates can be as difficult and terrifying as undertaking surgery. For those thinking about cutting ties, here are a few quick tips to numb the long-term pain of your roommate woes. Avoidance “The only way to get the best of an argument is to avoid it,” said best-selling author Dale Carnegie. The best way to avoid conflicts at your apartment is not to be there. Make a schedule of when your roommate is home. Now take a permanent marker, and black out those blocks, and write over them with red ink: study in library, dinner with friends, long walk around campus or dig a hole to China. Be dirty The dirtier you are, the less likely they will want to live with you. Try eating meals in their bed. Leave your dirty dishes on their night stand. If you ever do have to wash any dishes, do it in the toilet bowl. Once the mess piles up, blame them. Take your friends on guided tours through their messy rooms. Be sure to use metaphorical language comparing the room to a pigsty or a tsunami refugee camp. Redecorate the living room Print up bad photos of your roommate and hang them all over your living room walls. You know the one, with the double chin, and the one black and white photo where they tried to be artsy, but just ended up looking like a whitewashed bloated Jabba The Hut with heartburn. Tack it up. These tactics may make matters worse temporarily, but in the long run, they will not put up a fight to move...

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Grad student creates fat loss educational program

By Andra Holbrooks Laura Williams, operations manager in the Mayborn Campus Center, came up with an idea that has turned into a full time job, but unpaid. FATLOSS, Foundation for Altered Thinking on Lifestyle, Overweight, and our Sedentary Status ,came to Williams’ mind through her experience. “I’ve always kind of had body issues, and they started way back in high school,” she said. “Good, bad or indifferent, I was always really critical of myself.” Williams’ undergrad degree is in exercise sports science, and she has learned many of the things one needs to know about weight, body fat and living a healthy lifestyle. Since graduating college, she has worked in the fitness industry. “But I could never quite overcome my own personal issues with myself,” she said. “And this isn’t to say that I ever thought I was totally unattractive or overweight, anything like that. I just was overly critical of my body.” Last spring when Williams began graduate school, a “light bulb clicked. I wanted to get my knowledge out there in a way that would be fun and exciting—and free—to anyone.” FATLOSS is an organization geared toward providing educational information and programs to increase physical activity and healthy living choices in Americans. “All the services provided are offered free of charge because no one should be denied the opportunity for good health,” Williams said. Knowledge is key to living a healthy lifestyle. “With as much information and wisdom that I personally have, that’s distressing when you think of all the people out there who don’t have that knowledge and probably have the same issues or worse,” she said. Pressures are all around society, such as TV stars, magazine beauties, infomercials about quick weight loss and fad diets. “It’s not even about your weight. That’s a terrible measurement,” Williams said. “Body fat testing tells you a lot about what weight really is as a measurement of health and fitness. I don’t ever have to think about my weight as long as I do the things I need to be doing to stay healthy.” Williams is not only concerned for the UMHB community, but for Americans all over. “The goal throughout society has to change. Losing weight, being thin or being a certain size should redirect towards to being a healthy person in general. And when you make good choices to become that person, like getting the correct groceries or doing more physical activity, the other will come as a byproduct of that,” she said. Sarah Peterson, one of Williams’ employees, said, “What Laura is doing is really great. FATLOSS has the potential to change the minds of so...

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Pumpkin Patch
Nov04

Pumpkin Patch

Freshman art major Kaylee Wideman (left) and freshman nursing major Nathan Johnson compete in Hardy Hall’s annual pumpkin carving contest. Some of the orange squash featured funny faces, leaves, Luther Memorial and many other tributes to fall.

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Corporate corruption hurting us all

By Jordan Gustin Here’s a riddle. How does Congress solve a problem in America? They throw taxpayer money at it and hope it sticks. Since a riddle is a solution shrouded in a mystery, this answer wasn’t much of a riddle. Congress’ nonchalant mismanagement of our money has long been known. They explain their reason for spending during times when saving is needed, but even the blind could see right past the greed and corruption that grins beneath. When a CEO is laid off due to corruption in a corporate scandal, no one is surprised. When a congressman is put on trial for accepting gifts and is found guilty, no one is shocked. So why does everyone allow these CEOs and congressmen to handle their money and spend it freely? It happens because of the corrupt mindset most people unknowingly accept growing up. From a young age, Americans are taught that if they become very rich, they have a right to hoard all of that money for themselves. They’ve earned it. We reward wealth in America. The problem is that most of the rich people in our country haven’t worked very hard to get it. Why is it that we praise our teachers, police officers, fire fighters and military personnel as heroes but pay them next to nothing? Why allow our least respected paper-pushers and money-manipulators to make more money than anyone else simply by “knowing people who know people?” Haven’t the real heroes earned more than just respect? Something is very wrong with this picture. It’s time for a change. Democrats and Republicans alike have caused this problem. Corporate giants have paid our congressmen and congresswomen copious amounts of cash to vote in their favor. Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac were doing this for more than 10 years until they were taken over by the Federal Reserve in September along with other companies. Then the issue of a bailout came up. Once again, Congress predictably infused cash into the bloodstream of the problem — $800 billion (and counting) to be precise. In the process of deciding whether or not to pass the bailout, Congress uncovered some shady characters. Take for example Richard Fuld, former CEO of Lehman Brothers, who knew his company was going bankrupt and still decided to keep $480 million plus additional payouts. Still living in a $14 million oceanfront villa with a million-dollar art collection, he complained to Congress that he didn’t get any severance pay and that he lost more than $10 million. Congressman Waxman set Fuld straight by reminding everyone, “You made all this money taking risks with other people’s money.” So why...

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