Viewers navigate maze of emotion
Oct23

Viewers navigate maze of emotion

Based on the first novel of James Dashner’s bestselling trilogy, The Maze Runner presents a suspenseful and dark version of dystopian ideals found in films like The Hunger Games and Divergent.   The movie begins with 16 year-old Thomas waking up inside of an underground elevator. When he surfaces, he finds himself surrounded by dozens of other teenage boys in the middle of a meadow.   He doesn’t know where he is, why he’s there or even who he is. Apparently, none of the boys can remember anything about their past lives either, recalling only their names.   The group lives in a primitive camp built in the meadow, dubbed “The Glade” by residents of the dystopia. The boys call themselves “gladers,” and have made a life in the rough, green setting by building their own homes and growing food.   Anything else they need is sent to them once a month through the mysterious elevator. Along with the necessities comes a new boy, who is introduced to the lifestyle and encouraged to adapt to the strange circumstances.   Some gladers have lived there for years, and many have died there as well.   But why are they stuck in The Glade, and why can’t they just leave?   Surrounding the camp on all sides and towering in all of its ivy-covered glory is the solid stone walls of the maze. The only way out is through the maze, but very few enter it.   The brave kids who volunteer for the treacherous task are called “runners,” and it is their sole mission to run the course, mapping and charting all of the alleys and passages in hopes of finding the escape route.   However, there are a few problems with navigating the maze. The “runners” must return to the Glade before nightfall, because the opening to the course closes until early morning.   No one has ever survived a night within the walls, thanks to the Grievers — large, grotesque creatures that haunt gladers’ nightmares.   To make things worse, the maze changes each night as walls shift and new pathways open, making the possibility of finding a way out even more challenging.   Shortly after the arrival of Thomas, everything changes when the first girl shows up in the elevator, holding a written message.   Do they stay and die in the Glade? Or should they face the maze and all its dangers once and for all?   Sacrifices will be made, alliances will be formed and many will die before the maze trial is complete.   The Maze Runner proves to be both entertaining and thrilling....

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Letter to the Editor

It’s a sad day in a nation when people lower themselves by comparing one movement with the suffering of another, but it is even more devastating to devalue another movement as being less or more insignificant. To believe that the homosexual community has not had hardships is like saying toast does not go through the toaster. Gay is not the new black, but the LGBT community is a group that receives a large amount of persecution that should never be undermined, regardless of one’s opinion on the issues of marriage, sin or political views. People who say, “They don’t have it bad. They just complain too much. They need to just be normal like everybody else,” might want to re-evaluate what persecution is. For example, the Suicide Prevention Resource Center has indicated that 30-40 percent of the LGBT population has attempted suicide. The Report of the Secretary’s Task Force has shown that LGBT youth are four times more likely to commit suicide than other people within the same age demographic. Even more astonishing is, in terms of the higher education population from professors to students, up to 25 percent of these people have been ridiculed for their sexual orientation according to a study done in the Chronicle of Higher Education. Lastly, according to the National Coalition for the Homeless, up to 40 percent of homeless youth that are served in shelters claim to be LGBT. These youth have found themselves on the street because of things like school harassment, family rejection of sexual orientation and being forced to leave home by their own parents when “coming out.” Studies show with a resounding “yes” that the LGBT community is persecuted. If Americans expect liberty in their religion, culture, race, or way of life, they must stand against persecution of all groups, no matter how big or small.   Jasper Gates,...

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The Maze Runner
Oct14

The Maze Runner

Based on the first novel of James Dashner’s bestselling trilogy, Maze Runner presents a suspenseful and dark version of dystopian ideals found in films like The Hunger Games and Divergent.   The movie begins with 16 year-old Thomas waking up inside of an underground elevator. When he surfaces, he finds himself surrounded by dozens of other teenage boys in the middle of a meadow.   He doesn’t know where he is, why he’s there, or even who he is. Apparently, none of the boys can remember anything about their past lives, recalling only their names.   The group lives in a primitive camp built in the meadow, dubbed “The Glade” by residents of the dystopia. The men call themselves “gladers,” and have made a life in the primitive, green setting by building their own homes and growing their food.   Anything else they need is sent to them once a month through the mysterious elevator. Along with the necessities comes a new boy, who is introduced to the lifestyle and encouraged to adapt to the strange circumstances.   Some gladers have lived there for years, and many have died there as well.   But why are they stuck in The Glade, and why can’t they just leave?   Surrounding the camp on all sides and towering in all of its ivy-covered glory are the solid stone walls of The Maze. The only way out is through the maze, but very few enter it.   The brave men that volunteer for the treacherous task are called “runners,” and it is their sole mission to run the maze, mapping and charting all of the alleys and passages in hopes of finding the escape route.   However, there are few problems with running the maze. The “runners” must return to the Glade before nightfall, because the opening to the maze closes. No one has ever survived a night within the walls, thanks to the Grievers—large, grotesque creatures that haunt gladers’ nightmares.   To make things worse, the maze changes each night as walls shift and new pathways open, making the possibility of finding a way out even more challenging.   Shortly after the arrival of Thomas, everything changes.   Do they stay and die in the Glade? Or should they face the maze and all its dangers once and for all?   Sacrifices will be made, alliances will be formed, and many will die before the maze trial is complete.   Maze Runner proves to be both entertaining and thrilling. It’s a little slow in the beginning, but once the events start rolling, one after another, the audience is greeted with non-stop...

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Saluting Hood’s Fallen
May06

Saluting Hood’s Fallen

THE BELLS — by Antonio Hebert and Seth Stephens   One week after the shooting at Fort Hood April 2 that left three soldiers dead and 16 wounded, President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama visited the post, which is less than 20 minutes from UMHB. They joined top politicians from both the federal and state levels to publicly grieve with the families of the three soldiers killed. Soldier Ivan Lopez is accused of the deadly rampage.   The boots, helmet, rifle and dog tags of the deceased soldiers were placed at the front of the stage. After the ceremony was over, attendees waited in a long line to pay their respects.   The president and first lady spent a moment in silence before each of the three battle crosses. Obama, in a solemn tone opened his remarks by saying, “In our lives, in our joys and in our sorrows, we’ve learned that there is ‘a time for every matter under heaven.’  We laugh and we weep.  We celebrate and we mourn.  We serve in war and we pray for peace.  But Scripture also teaches that, alongside the temporal, one thing is eternal….” He praised the soldiers who died in the April 2 tragedy: Sgt. 1st Class Danny Ferguson, Staff Sgt. Carlos A. Lazaney-Rodriguez and Sgt. Timothy Owens.   There wasn’t enough seating for all soldiers in attendance at the ceremony, so many stood or sat on the ground. Standard bearers held company flags among the sea of army camouflage.   Those gathered for the ceremony who weren’t military were dressed mostly in dark colors and sat quietly waiting for the president to appear on the steps, signaling the service to begin.   “It was love for country that inspired these three Americans to put on the uniform and join the greatest Army that the world has ever known,” Obama said. “It was love for the Army that made them the soldiers they were.”   The president directly addressed the loved ones who attended the memorial. “For you, their families, no words are equal to your loss.  We are here on behalf of the American people to honor your loved ones and to offer whatever comfort we can.  But know this. We also draw strength from you.  For even in your grief, even as your heart breaks, we see in you that eternal truth. ‘Love never ends,’” he said.   Obama tried to offer comfort by identifying with the grieving parents. He said, “To the parents of these men ––  I cannot begin to fathom your anguish.  But I know that you poured your love and your hopes...

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Camp gives high schoolers inside look at Cru nursing
May06

Camp gives high schoolers inside look at Cru nursing

THE BELLS — By Sarah Hogue   The second annual Explore Cru Nursing summer camp for prospective students will offer many improvements on last summer’s kickoff. One includes a longer camp time.   “Based on some of the campers’ feedback and our own debriefing conversations and ideas, we decided to extend it,” associate nursing professor and camp co-coordinator Tracy Booth said. “Most of the campers said that they would have liked to have had more days here and more class and lab time.”   The idea for the camp was derived from Baylor University’s summer camp through the College of Engineering and Computer Science. “My husband works at Baylor … and he had been involved in a camp they did,” Booth said. “And I thought ‘Well, what a good idea.’ So he introduced us to the person there that coordinates their summer camp. We met with him, and he gave us some information on some things to think about.”   After the initial spark of an idea, Booth and assistant nursing professor and director of simulated learning, Kelda McMullen-Fix, proposed the idea to the department. The plans had been in the works for two years before the department finalized them.   “(They were) implemented last year with a successful launch,” Dean and nursing professor Sharon Souter said. “These camps were our first approach.”   The purpose of the event is what the name implies. It gives prospective students the chance to explore what nursing really is. “I think being in high school, you’re at such a crossroads. You don’t know what you want to do,” senior nursing major and previous camp counselor Christopher Romero said. “I feel as if this camp is able to direct them in a path they would possibly want to do. I think we will be able to help out more high schoolers to figure out what the Lord has for their path.”   The camp will run June 15 through 21. It will accept 16 potential students who are high school juniors and seniors. The application process includes grade point average requirements and essays. “While it’s not on the complete level of a nursing student because they don’t have some of the foundational information, it’s to give them an idea of what it would be like in nursing school,” Booth said. “We want to be sure that they know what they’re getting into and that they wouldn’t be completely overwhelmed.”   The camp offers a large opportunity to both campers and current students, because it allows UMHB students to act as counselors and small group leaders. “I went to a camp similar to this...

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