Go-Print system points to homework ease

By Marisol Escobar Students no longer have to scramble for change when making copies at the library. A new printing system was implemented this semester in order to save the university money on ink and paper. Each semester, students receive 200 printing points. Any not used will be deleted, and the balance goes back to 200 again. The credit does not have cash value nor does it roll over to the next school semester. Points deducted from students’ accounts depend on which lab they use. At those labs where paper is provided, one page costs two points. If students are required to bring their own paper, then one page costs one point. “I know that can seem a bit confusing. I would prefer that we were consistent in all labs,” Associate Vice President for Technology Marshall Eidson said. “But since InfoTech does not manage all of the labs, we felt that we needed the input of the lab supervisors, who are generally faculty members, and this is what we came up with.” When students run out of points, they have the option to reload points at the bursar’s office in increments of $5, which will get them an additional 100 points. “So far this semester, we are seeing about 10 students per week add points to their accounts. We will continue to monitor this throughout the semester,” Eidson said. The new system has its perks. “We like the new Go- Print system, and it saves some time for the library staff,” Director of Learning Services Denise Karimkhani said. “It also saves money.” He said in the past, students would print, but not pick up the copies. “The library would have to absorb the cost of the printouts,” he said. “This new method charges to the students’ accounts, so the student is paying for it even if they never pick up the copies.” Many students are also pleased with the new printing procedures. “I didn’t know about this until a friend told me. I find it much easier than having to dig in my pocket for change to pay. You just print and go,” graphic design major Jamie Salgado said. Business systems major Tyler Jones noticed careless printing habits before the new point system became effective. “Our paper usage last year was super high, and they were trying to create a system to make sure people just don’t abuse the school’s resources,” Jones said. “I’ve seen people print up to 50 pages at one time on meaningless stuff because they can. I think it’s a fair system.” Printing has been reduced significantly by about 80 percent. “Students are finding other...

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Leader makes impact through BSM ministry
Dec08

Leader makes impact through BSM ministry

By Rachel Yubeta Not a single day passes by that Canada isn’t far from her thoughts. Senior sociology major Audrey Rader — the leader of the Baptist Student Ministry’s IMAGE Bible study — spent the year before she was a college freshman in Canada at Capernwray Québec, a branch of Torchbearers International. Capernwray is one of 25 Bible schools located in 20 different countries and sponsored by this international organization. One of the important tenants of this organization approaches the Bible as a tool students should know how use as individuals free from the influence of other beliefs. The program aims to guide students into a level of comfort with the Bible that enables them to approach their faith with strong individual convictions. Rader said the program leads students to “not just listen to a speaker and believe what they say, but look it up for yourself.” This healthy suspicion of what is said when it comes to spiritual matters is still something that Rader tries to hold onto in her daily life. As a first time leader of the women’s oncampus devotional called Image, Rader is excited to have the opportunity to study the Bible and share her beliefs with others at the university. “I think community is huge,” she said. “Community growth and community living is really hard, but you learn a lot from it. (It) is a big part of learning Christianity, but also a big lacking point sometimes in our world.” Christian ministries major Kristian Nichols said, “I’ve known Audrey for a while, and now that I get to spend a lot of time with her at the BSM, it is obvious to me that she is passionate about serving others.” Rader’s dedication to the importance of community follows her outside the realm of life as a student at UMHB. Rader has spent a significant amount of time working as a counselor at Laity Lodge’s children’s camp, Singing Hills. Her calling in life, she believes is to try to reach out and positively influence the lives of a younger generation. Friend and roommate of Rader, senior psychology major Beky Cheatham said, “I’m amazed by Audrey’s dedication to summer camp ministry. I’ve worked at a summer camp before, and it’s exhausting. It takes a special type of person to be willing to go back year after year.” Rader believes it is important for older members of a community to mentor its younger members because “we have a lot to share — share our experiences and share our fears.” Elementary age children are the group that she feels she is called to reach. “They accept everyone still....

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Finding time for fitness
Dec08

Finding time for fitness

By Nicci Krause Working out is important to students. Whether they do it to stay in shape, to relieve stress, or to stay healthy for the future, they are going to the campus gym on their own to work out. “I know in the long run, it will benefit me to stay healthy,” sophomore athletic training major Kathryn Embersics said. She keeps the future in mind. “It is especially important to work out in our society today since there is an increased rate of heart disease.” Most students agree that exercising is important and go as often as they can. Freshman chemistry major Sasha Maples and athletic training major Keishla Maldonado said they usually make it to the gym about two times a week. “I go whenever I can,” Maldonado said. “I haven’t been able to go lately, though, because I’ve been so busy with training and classes.” She, Maples and Embersics all enjoy running and spend most of their exercise time doing that. Depending on how she feels, Maldonado will either run inside the gym on a treadmill, or outside, around the school. If there’s time, shewill follow her run with a quick abdominal workout. Maples and Embersics both run outside. Embersics enjoys running in the park behind the apartments near campus and will occasionally lift weights in her room. Maples said she even goes running at night sometimes. “I like going on midnight runs around the campus.” Sports management major Doug Peak said he goes to the gym about four times a week. “It depends on the day, but I do weights, cardio and I go to the classes offered at the gym.” He has been to Cru Crunch and Turbo Kick and has enjoyed both of them. “I like Jessie (the instructor) because she’s really funny,” Peak said. He said she makes the classes fun to attend. Maldonado agrees that the classes offered at the gym are fun. She has been to Cru Crunch a few times but hasn’t been able to go as often as she’d like because of her busy schedule. Both Maldonado and Embersics are athletic trainers. They have to go to different sport practices and be there about an hour and a half to two hours early and stay late for every practice. They said that their hectic schedules interfere with their exercise times. However, they try to make time to work out a couple of times per week. They know and understand how important it is to stay healthy. Especially with the fast, greasy food most students eat, exercise is particularly important. Embersics said she doesn’t always get to eat the...

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Holidays apart
Nov24

Holidays apart

By Sarah Sattelberg This Christmas will mark the third Christmas out of four that my husband, Ryan, has been deployed. Some people might think this would make me resent the Army or the war in Iraq, but it makes me proud of what his absence stands for. I do not wish to wallow in the self pity that being without the one you love can bring on. I want to revel in the true meaning of the holidays. Christmas is not only the birth of our Savior but a time to reflect on the beauty of family and friends near or far. Holidays become a habit for most Americans; it is something they do the same time every year. We just go through the motions with little thought. Celebrating the holidays seems like our God-given right. The holidays for me are no longer just something I do out of habit, but something I am inexplicably grateful for. Every Christmas, birthday, or New Year’s that my husband and I spend together feels like a gift from God. The reality of war is he might never make it home to see another Christmas. So I cherish every time he does make it home. Since the war in Iraq began, 4,356 American soldiers have been killed. Sixty-seven soldiers were killed in Afghanistan in October alone. Holidays for the families of fallen soldiers are no longer habits but an obstacle in the grieving process. Every holiday marks the anniversary of the last one they spent with their fallen hero. I will spend Christmas not alone but with friends who are the closest things to family without being genetically linked. Our friendships have been forged on long deployments, and we all now have a bond that can never be broken. We will put on our brave faces and try to make the best out of a crappy situation. We will celebrate but not wholeheartedly because half our hearts are missing. We will not open all of the presents, but keep them wrapped until our husbands and wives return in January at the end of this rotation. Our spouses will celebrate as best they can in a place like Iraq. Their dining facility Christmas dinner will leave something to be desired. They will open the boxes filled with festive Christmas items, baked goods and presents we have sent them. They will read the thank you letters that children and strangers have mailed. They will soldier on and pretend it’s not that big of a deal being deployed on Christmas. I won’t pretend this is easy. Holidays are the most difficult time for families and deployed...

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Living the American dream

By Marisol Escobar Immigration is a highly debated topic. Many U.S. citizens strongly oppose any reform to legalize immigrant status. In a time like this, it’s extremely intimidating to express that you are for immigrant rights without being scorned by others. As the daughter of immigrants, I’m truly grateful for immigrant amnesty. The reform was passed in 1986 when I was just a baby. Thanks to former President Ronald Reagan, my parents were able to become legal residents. I cannot imagine them living with fear and little rights. They now live a life of peace and freedom. My parents are hard working people. They did not even finish middle school, but taught me things far more valuable than what you learn in school. Everything that was given to me was with their love and dedication. They worked from the bottom and moved their way up. They never asked the government for help when they were illegal immigrants. They never went to the doctor or asked for food stamps. Their outlook on life was to do things with honesty. My mother even put her life at risk to live a better life. She was robbed at gun point while trying to make it to the U.S. Their path to the American dream wasn’t easy; they overcame many obstacles. Growing up we would take trips to Mexico. Every Christmas we would travel 18 hours by vehicle. About 10 hours into the trip, we would always pass through the state of San Luis Potosi. One of my most vivid memories as a child was seeing children and women along the side of the road begging for food, money and clothes. We would stop along the road and give them what we could. As my sisters and I got back into the car, my parents would remind us how fortunate we were. My last trip to Mexico was about two years ago, and we passed through the same state. I saw a woman running with a baby in her arms because a car had stopped to give her help. My heart sank. I immediately became overwhelmed with tears in my eyes. I could not imagine living a life of poverty and desperation. Until you have walked in other people’s shoes, it is hard to even begin to imagine what they truly go through. The problem with Mexico is their government. For many years the citizens dealt with a dishonest government. There has been an influx of illegal immigrants in recent years. In order for that to stop, the government needs to fix its system. They should create more jobs and make it a...

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